Opinions on this

bryn

Well-Known Member
I shot this Roe Doe on Tuesday morning. What you are looking at in the picture is a photo of a "growth" of some kind attached to the fat which covers the fillet (in-between the kidneys and the groin area) and its about the size of a sloe berry.
Observations prior to the shot and the subsequent gralloch identified a healthy animal. The experienced stalkers I know have no idea and as such the carcass will not be going for human consumption much to my dogs delight.
Your opinions as always are appreciated,
bryn
View attachment 52762
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Could be a cyst due to a localised infection, maybe? Never seen anything like that before though
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Looks like a swollen lymph node. The little red one next to it is what is should look like. If the rest of the lymph nodes are all ok then it is probably just a sign of local infection and the carcass should be ok.
MS
 

arron

Well-Known Member
That's the great thing about this site , just ask and some one will put you right with no dramas, we all have to learn !
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
It could be a lymph node, or a haemic node but this looks like it has a small tag of fascial tissue attached - I presume it was free moving? So it might be a mesenteric node left behind. It could be a bit of necrotic fat, but going out on a limb a bit, I wonder if it is an ovary. It looks OK to me and if all other nodes and carcass inspection were normal it's probably fit - as your dogs may well be telling you. If you really want to know, take it off and, once the rest of the inspection is finished and it is away from the carcass, cut into it. I wouldn't normally advocate that in the field, but I see no problem once in a controlled environment (before I gets told off!).
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Looks to me to be just a swollen Hemal node as it is clearly attached to another close by. This is part of a ruminant lymphatic system and shows as small 'black bean' type nodes in the thorax or abdo areas. I cant see how it could be an ovary as it is clearly attached to the inside of the main body? Mesenteric nodes are surely firmly fixed within the small intestine?
MS
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
You're probably right. However, the ovary is attached behind the kidney up against the top of the abdomen and the mesenteric root that hangs all the intestines is in a similar place. It's the wrong shape for an ovary (and wrong size given the time of year) but it was so yellow that I wondered about some oddity.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
You're probably right. However, the ovary is attached behind the kidney up against the top of the abdomen and the mesenteric root that hangs all the intestines is in a similar place. It's the wrong shape for an ovary (and wrong size given the time of year) but it was so yellow that I wondered about some oddity.
Interesting, I've never really looked at where the reproductive bits attach!
You'd be amazed at how many 'deer experts' don't know what the little purple/black nodes are though! I did 3 DSC 2 stalks for a vet once which was quite educational even though I was the witness! He pointed out bits during his gralloch that I didn't even know existed!:lol:
MS:tiphat:
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
I have to confess to doing some background research on the haemic nodes, they don't tend to occur much in the main farm species!
 

martijn

Well-Known Member
Hi, that is a lymph node, be it a bit angry and enlarged. As stated before you have "normal" nodes and Blood nodes which tend to look slightly more dodgy colour wise. you do have them close to the kidneys but nodes can vary greatly in shape size and location depending on individual animal and "challenge". if the rest of the animal was normal I think your dogs had a prime venison dinner.:) for those who never see a blood lymph node look at the trachea/windpipe. plenty(small ones) to see there normally.
 

bryn

Well-Known Member
Thanks to all for your replies.
I am more than happy the deer is eatable is now butchered and in the freezer. The dog has had a couple of good meals as a result of this but not anymore.

Regards
Bryn
 

morena

Well-Known Member
An interesting photo and also the description of the position " between the kidney and the groin area " This is precisely the route the testicle on its way to the scrotum takes. Could this be a developmental fault ? 1 A rudimentary testicle 2 An ovotestis ( combined ovary/testicle ) Roe deer present a larger proportion of these abnormalities than other deer or are they more closely studied?
The first mention of these conditions plus various other sex related conditions were described by RORIG published 1899 after a series of dissection and microscopic examinations of Roe. WISLOKI in the states has described a couple of case in Whitetail deer.
Final answer yes worth eating the animal.Enjoy

As an aside the so-called doe perukes reported in the shooting press recently have. when tested all. come back SRY gene+ indicating the presence of testosterone. By definition hermaphrodite/pseudo hermaphrodite animals.
 

geoshot

Well-Known Member
There are some good threads on the SD site as a whole, but the very best are often in this section and this is one of them.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
An interesting photo and also the description of the position " between the kidney and the groin area " This is precisely the route the testicle on its way to the scrotum takes. Could this be a developmental fault ? 1 A rudimentary testicle 2 An ovotestis ( combined ovary/testicle ) Roe deer present a larger proportion of these abnormalities than other deer or are they more closely studied?
The first mention of these conditions plus various other sex related conditions were described by RORIG published 1899 after a series of dissection and microscopic examinations of Roe. WISLOKI in the states has described a couple of case in Whitetail deer.
Final answer yes worth eating the animal.Enjoy

As an aside the so-called doe perukes reported in the shooting press recently have. when tested all. come back SRY gene+ indicating the presence of testosterone. By definition hermaphrodite/pseudo hermaphrodite animals.

Superb explanation, and one that I can actually believe and trust to be accurate.
A superb post that is not based on assumptions but rather on years of combined scientific study, experience and knowledge. Thank you for taking the time to educate the less experienced folk, like me !

Kind regards, Olaf
 
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