Overview of the Reloading Process - From Spent Case to Loaded Round

DanBow

Well-Known Member
@Alantoo

Thanks for that, I'll have a look when I get home tonight.

One other thing that I've noticed, is that there seems to be a lot of people reloading .243 Is that from a load development point of view or just plain cost?

Dan
 
It may be a 9 year old thread (at this point of reading) but is an excellent resource for me as a newbie. Well written and photographed, and knocks the spots off many US based reloading videos on Youtube. Thanks for the work you put in.
 

M Davis

Member
Hi, great article for me as I am about to reload by first batch soon. Quick question on the red apparatus. It looks like a Hornady Hk66. Do you know if this tool can also measure / compare case shoulder push back if i want to do only a partial full length die operation?????? I read that if you do a partial with a full die (versus neck only) and only push the shoulder back .006 thou (versus a full reform) it can be more accurate and lengthen case life. Any info on that red fixture in your caliper would be interesting. Thanks in advance. Mike.
 

M Davis

Member

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
Hi, great article for me as I am about to reload by first batch soon. Quick question on the red apparatus. It looks like a Hornady Hk66. Do you know if this tool can also measure / compare case shoulder push back if i want to do only a partial full length die operation?????? I read that if you do a partial with a full die (versus neck only) and only push the shoulder back .006 thou (versus a full reform) it can be more accurate and lengthen case life. Any info on that red fixture in your caliper would be interesting. Thanks in advance. Mike.
A .006” shoulder bump in a F/L sizing die is way too much.
If you have the Hornady ‘Headspace’ measuring tool and correct bushing for your cartridge, it measures from a datum point roughly on the centreline of case shoulder, to the cartridge ‘Head’ .. (where the primer sits).
Measure this dimension from one of the cases fired in YOUR rifle.
That dimension is where to set you F/L sizing die and your shoulder bump back should not exceed .002”-.003”.

The red Hornady tool also accepts the bullet comparator bushing, so with the correct bushing for the bullet calibre, you can interchange the bushing to correctly set both headspace and bullet seating dimensions.
 

M Davis

Member
A .006” shoulder bump in a F/L sizing die is way too much.
If you have the Hornady ‘Headspace’ measuring tool and correct bushing for your cartridge, it measures from a datum point roughly on the centreline of case shoulder, to the cartridge ‘Head’ .. (where the primer sits).
Measure this dimension from one of the cases fired in YOUR rifle.
That dimension is where to set you F/L sizing die and your shoulder bump back should not exceed .002”-.003”.

The red Hornady tool also accepts the bullet comparator bushing, so with the correct bushing for the bullet calibre, you can interchange the bushing to correctly set both headspace and bullet seating dimensions.
Thanks Deeangeo, noted for the .002 to .003. I am awaiting the delivery of the Hornady HK66 headspace measuring tool to get a baseline on once fires cartridges. This in conjunction with Redding incremental dies should give me better consistency. I am releoading 6x62 Freres and it is proving to be a difficult one to get right and accurate so far. Many thanks. Mike
 

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