Perruque

JH83

Well-Known Member
#1


This is a perruque I shot this year, any idea why this occurs? He was a good weight and holding a doe.

James.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#2
I was told that it happens when the buck damages the antler whilst still in velvet. I guess that with insects poking around the wound and then bacteria, it will cause an infection. Whatever the reason, I can imagine that its not very comfortale for the deer.
 

Drew

Well-Known Member
#3
According to Richard Prior it's casued by a lack of testosterone...most perruques will be found to have abnormal testes...apparently!
 
G

Grantoliver

Guest
#4
Drew is absolutley correct from my reading of priors books. My only personal contribution is that if this condition leads to 'fly strike' then they need to be culled immediately because I have to deal with this condition every year in sheep and its extemely distressing. For all concerned.

Grant
 

Fester

Well-Known Member
#5
Yeh its a problem with the poor little sods balls whats caused it. (Testoserone) :eek: Hes a nice looking little buck tho.
Its best to shoot them before it gets infected. A friend of mine shot one in thetford a few years ago & its velvet had almost covered its head :cry:
 

JH83

Well-Known Member
#6
Yes he was a decent buck, a good weight, and like I say with a female, which bearning in mind comments made, that it is due to a lack of testosterone, surprising. It was mid rut.

As you can see it is huge deformation and was hard, but in velvet.

I couldnt believe it when I saw him, the first thing I thought was he was a huge medal head, but on closer inspection a perruque, so I decided to take him as I know it can start to impare vision and cause discomfort.

I believe they used to be more common when people shot roe with shotguns as they would get tail ended. Imagine!

Thanks for your thoughts.

James.
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
#7
A few more at the Forest & Wildlife Museum, Horsholm, Denmark.
Deformed snouts are due to a wide-angle lens on a pocket camera and not a bad taxidermist.

HWH.

 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#8
These peruque heads also come about by a buck catching his wedding tackle on barbed wire fences and such like. It the testes on a buck are damaged in anyway it will normally produce a peruque head. It can also occur with internal malformation of the sexual organs as well.

Believe it or not it was fairly common place in Victorian times and for a short while after for keepers to shoot buck with a shotgun up the back to try and produce heads such as these. We have a book in the museum that tells of this taking place on ahighland estate, to satisfy wealthy continental stalkers of the time. :eek:
 

tika.308

Well-Known Member
#9
thats what i was told aswell sikamalc,it went on alot in germany years ago.the chap i did my dsc 1 with said always shoot them and to save any more misery for them.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#10
I would also add that in really severe cases of a buck with a peruque head it will cover the eyes, but this is a really extreme case.

You might be interested to know that we have a Sambur Stag head in the collection that is a peruque, it is a massive head, and very rare.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#12
The museum I am the Curator of is the Powell Cotton Museum at Quex Park, where I have been for 34 years. We have over the past three years held a day for the BDS South East Branch, which is usually well attended.

We do have a website, however it is only a basic one and there is no access to the collections, which by the way numbers 6000 speciemns of big game from Africa and Asia. Which is where I have been involved with DNA. In particular we have helped with the Giant Sable project in Angola and South Africa, Oslo Uni looking at climatic change in Tragelaphines (spiral horn antelopes), Abyssinian jackal to name but a few.

There is a firearm collection, cannon, over 30,000 items of Ethnography, fine arts, a small stately home a restaurant and well laid out gardens, all within a 250 acre estate.

If members of the forum would like to attend visit sometime this summer in a group, I would be more than happy to arrange this and take you also around the stores at the back.

Perhaps Rob might have something in mind?
 

stone

Well-Known Member
#13
300wsm
that sounds like a good idea .
what are the possibilites sikamalc of arranging a veiwing at some stage if there is enough interest ?
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#16
Hi 300wsm. Yes Eland are Tragelaphines, which also includes Kudu (lesser and greater) Nyala (common and mountain) Bongo, Sitatunga and Bushbuck.

Oslo University wanted samples from as many species and sub species as possible, including some of the now very rare Bushbuck sub species like Menelinks and the Giant Bushbuck from Somalia, which is probably extinct now. As we have longitude and latitude and locality on all the specimens, which are not dressed skins, we 99.9% of the time get a full sequence from each sample, and the fact that we can pinpoint where it was collected in say 1903, makes the whole collection under my care a priceless resource and an ever valuable library for researchers from all over the world.

So 9 or so months I do this and the rest I take clients stalking/hunting.

PS you will always find a single malt at my home for friends old and new ;)
 

Drew

Well-Known Member
#17
Had a look at the Website Malc...amazing stuff. What an opportunity a visit would be. Shame they don't let me off the island much!!
 

stone

Well-Known Member
#19
just out of interest how were any of these perruque heads treated as i thought that they were a soft mass of antler tissue mixed with blood so no hard horn , what was injected into this mass to make it hard and stop the mass rotting away(no suggestive remarks please , that includes you mr B :lol:)
 

Rob Mac

Well-Known Member
#20
Pruning

I've removed quite a few posts to try and get this one back on thread. Some very interesting posts. I'm going to try and speak with Malcolm today and get a date for the Museum visit.

Cheers,

Rob

Editor
 

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