pitted bore#

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deerwarden

Well-Known Member
years of using a moddy and moly coating have left my Mannlicher pitted on top of the crown and 1 to 2 " down barrel also about 5" down, We NOW know moisture and moly creates an acid that eches ordinary steel barrels, MODDYS SHOULD BE TAKEN OFF EVERY TIME YOU GET HOME, if you clean yuo'll need to resight next outing, but 15 years ago we didn't all know this, my question to rebarrel is £900, Mannlchers are glued in, so half to be cut off at action and rethreaded. I read once about bullets which are coated in variouse grades of fine abrasive which allegedly give worn or pitted barrels a longer life, mines shooting OK but I do get flyers now and again, or any cheaper repairers out there, I know you can get a new Howa for£400+ what do you do with a rifle when they get old, why dont the original manufacture offer rebarreling etc. I cant understand why replacing the barrel here in the UK will exceed the cost of a new one fron Germany, any ideas out there, also beware of moly moddys and central heating any newbys to rifles, they interact to create an acidic lining in the moddy and rifle. deerwarden, really p~#?£d off at preasent :evil: :(
 

dieseldan

Well-Known Member
Barrel length

You do not state if it is a stutzen or a normal sporter.

I would chop it and re-crown it if it was possible. but i suppose you have looked at this.

Depending on calibre you will only lose 100ft/sec on velocity and accuracy may or not even be better.

just a thought.......
 

deerwarden

Well-Known Member
pitted bore

Yes had a look at that possibility, today Andrew at Riflecraft thinks he'll be able to do that, mans a wizard with rifles, gives a lot of advice as well no hard sell either. however still got some pitting/ erosion further down, its a full length sporter, so might be an answer. thanks for reply
 

300wsm

Well-Known Member
deerwarden said:
MODDYS SHOULD BE TAKEN OFF EVERY TIME YOU GET HOME, if you clean yuo'll need to resight next outing,

This is an old wives tell about after you clean a rifle you will have to re-zero it.
 

Bob

Well-Known Member
I agree with 300wsm, no need to re zero after cleaning unless of course you zeroed on a barrel fouled with excessive copper! Clean after every shooting trip/day if an extended trip and lightly oil barrel or just oil if you didn't shoot. Wipe out barrel with meths before start of next shooting day. Check with Andrew!

regards

Bob
 

Bob

Well-Known Member
Sorry 300wsm my apologies,

I just read your reply on foam cleaner thread and I appear to have repeated your advice given there! Still good advice bears repeating and imitation the best form of flattery and all that!

regards

Bob
 

325wsm

Well-Known Member
300wsm said:
deerwarden said:
MODDYS SHOULD BE TAKEN OFF EVERY TIME YOU GET HOME, if you clean yuo'll need to resight next outing,

This is an old wives tell about after you clean a rifle you will have to re-zero it.

BUT some rifles need one, two or even three 'dirtying' shots to bring back zero. My rem 308 shoots 3-4" different after cleaning but after 3 shots is back on song.
 

deerwarden

Well-Known Member
I too found it takes 2 or 3 shots to rezero after cleaning bore, however I now run patches thro after each outing, lightly oil the bore, then store rifle. Next outing clean with meths, I've checked zero and it's within 1" on first shot, or even less, It work's as posted by the guys. Try it if it doesn't work for you, check screws are tight, bedding, floating etc. Now use on all 5 of my rifles. I think minute traces of oil was left in barrel before I used meths, rifle would shoot low for 2 or 3 shots till cleaned ? by firing, I wish I found this out years ago, GOOD TIP guys. deerwarden :p
 

K333ROE

Well-Known Member
Pull through or run a rod with some lighter fuel through your barrel before you go shooting and you should have no problems and should be spot on
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Sorry chaps but I had to laugh at this and especially at soem fo the comments :lol: to say such blanket statements as this:-

This is an old wives tell about after you clean a rifle you will have to re-zero it.

Hmmm really :rolleyes: It would be more accurate to say that some rifles do not require re-zeroing after cleaning or that some rifles require one or more fouling shots after cleaning to get back to shooting where they were ;) .

Now I am new to shooting with sound moderators on anything other than .22L/R but not new to shooting nor stalking ;) and the one thing I have learned is that every barrel is different and the way it fouls, keeps accuracy and maintains POI after cleaning or with a cold barrel is never a given. Each and every one has to be shot and the way it performs noted.

For instance I have a .270 Win chambered rifle that copper fouls quite quickly, the bore is super smooth but it's tight :eek: you can feel it with the brush and patch as it takes more effort to push through than another rifle in 270 Win of the same make. It also shows pressure signs earlier due to the bore being tighter. So it requires cleaning more frequently than the other .270 rifle. As a matter of course now after cleaning and before stalking I shoot the rifle to verify zero.

If the first shot is out I will shoot a group of five then and only then if required make adjustments. I will also make note if the first shot from a cold barrel is diffrent from the next shots. Any rifle like that is religated to practice ;) .

Recently I have been giving consideration to aquiring a swage dies to draw down 0.277" bullets to a suitable size for this rifle and see it it helps however other "projects" are higher on the to do list that this so we shall see ;) .

Edit:- Oh and I WILL NOT USE MOLYCOATED BULETS EVER! as they encourage pitting :mad: .
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
The fouling allows a reaction under it and can also trap moisture. I brought a .243 that belonged to an underkeeper through a local gunshop. The bore was dirty in fact the whole gun was filthy. I took about 7 hours to clean it and when I cleaned th bore I found that you could barely see the rifling at the muzzle after many cleanings and applications of Forrest Foaming Bore cleaned the rifling at last became visable but I am sorry to say that the bore was pitted.

I had to degrease the trigger mech as it had been slavered in grease and once I got the accunlated grime off the outside of the action and bolt handle you could see that the bolt handle had been brazed back together. This rifle had been very abused so after a phone call to the shop the decision was made to return it even though the rifle shot quite accuractely. I did not want an abused rifle.

I have seen a couple of other rifles that had the same pitting caused by the moly fouling. You can also find pitting under copper fouling if it's left for a long time.
 

Chris Rob

Well-Known Member
The use of Moly coated bullets in itself will not cause corrosion or pitting there has to be other contributing factors at work before this can occur.

Molybdenum Disulfide (Moly) contains sulphur, which can cause corrosion if the free sulphides combine with moisture. Dissolved free sulphides are very aggressive & can corrode many metals including steel & stainless steel.

The oxidation of sulphides can also form thiosulfate which causes very severe pitting & corrosion of steel and stainless steel.

So the answer is simply to eliminate any moisture in the barrel of your rifle after use, remover the moderator & make sure the bore is dry.

I’ve used Moly coated Federal rounds in my Mannlicher 6.5x55 since they became available & the bore is as fresh as the day it came out of the factory.

I sympathise with deerwardens problem with his Mannlicher, no easy solution there. :(

Chris
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Chris,

That .243 P-H 1000 was shot using the Hornady V-Max 58 grn Moly Coated ammunition :!: I wonder if you have cleaned your rifle and removed the Moly and actually looked under it?

As I said that .243 I had for a few days had been abused so?

I also seem to recall Walt Berger saying something about pitting in the bore under the Moly fouling but if you happy with them and they perform for you then good for you. I personaly will not risk it ;)

Molybdenum Disulfide (Moly) contains sulphur, which can cause corrosion if the free sulphides combine with moisture. Dissolved free sulphides are very aggressive & can corrode many metals including steel & stainless steel.

The oxidation of sulphides can also form thiosulfate which causes very severe pitting & corrosion of steel and stainless steel.

Sorry but I am no Chemist :oops: but what your posted seems to my limited chemical understanding to be asking for problems so I'll pass ;)
 
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