Powder for 2 calibres

Look deer

Well-Known Member
Hi

As a bit of an amatuer, just wondering if some people can give me advice- would one powder make/type suit both .22-250 and .270, or would you need different ones?


Ta
 

cjm1066

Well-Known Member
In a work don't, if you have 2x powders and ideally different makes it saves the hassle when one goes off the market.
 

bobjs

Well-Known Member
i have 1 powder that will do both the rifles i have (not the same calibres as you) and i have a backup for each should they not be avaiable.

i can't see the issues with you having just the one powder ??

1 powder means less risk of loading the wrong powder in the wrong case etc.(seen it at bisley :doh: BOOM ................WHAT A MESS THE GUYS FACE WAS,)

bob.
 

Claret_Dabbler

Well-Known Member
22/250 and 270 are a poor pair of cartridges to try and cover with a single powder. It possibly could be done with something in the middle of the burn charts, maybe Varget or Reloder 15.

​I wouldn't even try it though, you will be compromising both rifles capabilities.
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
i have 1 powder that will do both the rifles i have (not the same calibres as you) and i have a backup for each should they not be avaiable.

i can't see the issues with you having just the one powder ??

1 powder means less risk of loading the wrong powder in the wrong case etc.(seen it at bisley :doh: BOOM ................WHAT A MESS THE GUYS FACE WAS,)

bob.

Err .... Bob. Unless you're using exactly the same calibres this advice isn't very helpful.:rolleyes:
The final sentence illustrates for different reasons why it's advisable for newbies to use an appropriate powder for the cartridge they've got.

I wouldn't dismiss the OP's question. It's valid in the case of the .22-250 and .270. The .22-250 can use a wide variety of powders because of it's large case size.

FWIW, I have tried IMR 4350 in both calibres. The Speer #13 Manual maximum in the .22-250 was 40 grains with a 55 grain bullet for 3400 FPS. It chronographed at 3418 FPS in a Tikka 22" - and was accurate.

I started very near Max because the limitation isn't pressure here, but just how much can be stuffed in the case. The Speer manual was right on this point, and on the velocity it gives. I've found Speer data the most reliable there is.

The point is that most shooters wouldn't be content with velocities which are 250 FPS shy of what the .22-250 can achieve with a matching powder.... but this cartridge is particularly flexible & can be run well with everything but the very fast numbers.

ATB.
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Your problem is case capacities are so different. The 270 Winchester is a large case and the slow burning powders that work so w well in it are just not suited to the 22-250........................... well not those easily obtainable here in the UK.

​It seems that IMR 4064 would do it rather well but good luck in finding some.
 

Look deer

Well-Known Member
OK

So let me get this- it is doable, within the confines of the reloading manual. But to get the best out of the rounds- or considering the availability of powders- people think I should go with different powders.

Can I just clarify exactly what impact using the same powder would have- is it velocity? accuracy? When Claret says 'compromising the rifles' capabilities' what exactly do you mean?

Ta
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
The faster powders normally used in the 22-250 will show pressure signs earlier in the 270 so velocities will not be equal to those slow burning powders the 270 Winchester cartridge just loves.

Of course to make use of these slow powders one needs a barrel of 24" or more in length really.
 

Claret_Dabbler

Well-Known Member
OK

So let me get this- it is doable, within the confines of the reloading manual. But to get the best out of the rounds- or considering the availability of powders- people think I should go with different powders.

Can I just clarify exactly what impact using the same powder would have- is it velocity? accuracy? When Claret says 'compromising the rifles' capabilities' what exactly do you mean?

Ta

Let's take Reloder 15 for eg. Without referring to load books, this powder is on the slow side for a 22/250. I doubt you would get enough of it in a 22/250 case to realise the velocity this round is capable of. You won't do any harm, and there is no reason the load should not be accurate, but you are sacrificing velocity.

Using the same Reloder 15 in a 270 is also possible, but it is too fast for the cartridge. Again, there is no reason the load won't be accurate, but you will not have a good case fill. Load data is only 45 grains for 2750 FPS with a 130gr bullet, so the manufacturer is concerned about pressure spikes, irregular ignition etc. The 270/130gr is easily capable of in excess of 3000 fps with a suitable powder.

So you have two decent rifles with scopes and mods, lets say a grand for each rifle, and another grand for each scope. £4000 of kit. And you would not spend £40 on an extra tub of powder to utilise the potential of each?
 

Look deer

Well-Known Member
I wasn't necessarily saying I wouldn't spend the extra £40- at the end of the day you're using the powder whether its bought in one or two tubs at a time.

If you read my initial post you will find I am just starting out in reloading, therefore was looking for advice and guidance.

Thank you to all who have provided it.
 

Dovebob

Well-Known Member
Look Dear,

I'm not an expert, but I've done a few loads.

My suggestion would be to start with a tried and tested bullet / powder / primer combo for each of the two cartridges you intend to load for. If you do a search on here, or ask people for their pet loads for .22 - 250 and .270, you'll get a feel for what works well. You'll also find that there is more data available for the classic combos. You'll still need to work up your own load which is safe and gets the performance you want from the cartridge (be that speed/ energy, accuracy or perhaps ideally both). However you'll be making things easier for yourself when doing so if you use tried and tested ingredients.


Using my own experience and mistakes as an example, my first rifle was a 6.5 x 55. I was advised that it would work well with Vit N160. I bought some and worked up loads for Hornaday and Sierra bullets. There was plenty of data available and I got good accuracy without too much hassle. I did similar with my second rifle.

When I bought my third rifle (.22 - 250) I got a bit cocky and bought a new type of powder, thinking it would offer some kind of advantage (not really sure what). There was very little data available for it. I ended up asking advice on here and then going a bit off piste for someone with my limited experience. With the benefit of hindsight, I wish I'd just bought a well proven powder with a good track record and plentiful data.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Bob
 

Claret_Dabbler

Well-Known Member
I wasn't necessarily saying I wouldn't spend the extra £40- at the end of the day you're using the powder whether its bought in one or two tubs at a time.

If you read my initial post you will find I am just starting out in reloading, therefore was looking for advice and guidance.

Thank you to all who have provided it.

Sorry, didn't mean to sound rude.

I am simply trying to say that it makes no sense to me to try and run a rifle on powder that is less than optimum for that particular cartridge.

I am currently loading for 204, 222rem, 22/250, 260rem and 30/06. I need at least four powders to cover that spread, I could probably do it with three, but to get the best out of each rifle I need at least four.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
You may look but dream on in the uk if you want to but any hogdon powders. No-one has got any at the moment!!

I was making a point, Einstein. :)
I thought it nicer than, "Get off your butt, pick up a reloading manual and have a look for yourself!" ...or the like.~Muir
 

Grandhubert

Well-Known Member
8uIf you use heavish bullets in the .22-250 ( for example a 60 grain v-max if it will stabilise) and a lightish bullet in the .270 ( For example a 130 grain Interlock) you can get pretty much full perfomance from both rounds with something in the order of H4350 or Reloder 17. I would recommend Reloder 17 as it is progressive burning for a quick powder in the .270 and better than anything slower in the .22-250 which isn't too far away in design from the short magnum cases RL17 was designed for in the first place.

Alliant Powder: Print Recipe

reloader 17 in 22-250

In my experience RL 17 mirrors H4350 very closely but the usual loading caveats apply with web load data in the latter link.
 
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