Pregnant doe?

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
Shot a doe today which had two identifiable embryos. Unfortunately it was a long way from the car and I had no camera.

My understanding was that the blastocyte only became implanted and started to grow around the third week in January.

Anyone better informed than me?

Notwithstanding the conditions this animal along with all the others I have shot lately (5 so far this month) was in very good nick. We have had snow cover for a month but its never been more than eight inches or so and currently less.
 

widows son

Well-Known Member
I'll point out one thing here this is not a science it is nature dates are only what people have noticed nature does not adhere to them in any shape or form.

They are only for People that are always in a hurry to live there life.
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
I'll point out one thing here this is not a science it is nature dates are only what people have noticed nature does not adhere to them in any shape or form.

They are only for People that are always in a hurry to live there life.

Reproductive biology is very much a science by anyone's reckoning but the issue here is not dates but diaphase - length of the day - or at least I understtod that was the current theory. This whole area of delay in the implantation is very much something which is still being researched but from my previous readings I was under the impression that this usually occurred between about 18 and 24 January. Think this was from work done by Roger Lambert (?) at Aberdeen.

Has anyone else found identifiable embyroes in roe this early?
 
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