Pulsar XP38 V Pulsar Helion XQ38F Hand Held Thermal Imager

woody

Well-Known Member
Hi Folks,

I have been looking at getting a thermal and was going to get this through Scott Country, however I noticed it was not on their internet site this week so enquired and was told it was been replaced by the XQ38 Helion, so was wondering if anyone knows anything about the new model as it is cheaper (?), is it an improvement? or should I still with the original (not fussed about video recording or wifi tech).

Anyone in the know?

Also the XQ38 seems to be selling fast in other stockists.

Richie
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
OK - so in short the Helion XP38 is the 640 sensor version - and the Helion XQ38F the 388 sensor version. The XQ38F is cheaper that the outgoing Quantum XQ38, but has the same sensor, lens and performance - with some upgraded software, a new body shell and battery set up. It is no surprise it is selling fast - it is one hell of a bit of kit for the money.

HTH - but feel free to PM if you need any more info.
 

75

Well-Known Member
Watching with interest - not a clue about the tech behind thermals but looking to get one at some point this year and no idea where to start!
 

75

Well-Known Member
So to summarise for the clueless among us (i.e. me!!)...

Helion XP38 - 640x480 17um sensor, range up to 1.3km, costs c.£3,300

Helion XQ38F - 384x288 17um sensor, range up to 1.3km, costs c.£2,000

Quantum Lite XQ30v - 384x288 17um sensor, range up to 900m, cost c.£1,200


On paper there seems little between the Lite and the Helion XQ38F for real world use - I don't need wifi or iPhone connectability. Or is there more to it than this? What else does the extra £800 get you, as they both seem to have the same sensor - which I'd have thought was the key to performance?
 

jthyttin

Well-Known Member
Helion models have smaller footprint but are heavier. If I had to make a guess I'd say Helion models have better lens system resulting in better and/or more pleasant picture.

You can expect to spot a fox at half the stated detection distance, at 1/3 the distance for sure. So even XQ23V would give you the FOV of XP38 (16.5 degrees) and around 250-400m max spotting distance.

You have to think through how you'd use the device and then weight the pros and cons of each model. Pulsar states also horizontal FOV so you can use e.g. detached riflescope to try what different FOV means (scope manufacturers spec the FOV also).
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
On paper there seems little between the Lite and the Helion XQ38F for real world use - I don't need wifi or iPhone connectability. Or is there more to it than this? What else does the extra £800 get you, as they both seem to have the same sensor - which I'd have thought was the key to performance?
I currently have the older XQ38, which is markedly better than the XD50, nothing to do with distance so much, but about the clarity, and detail one gives over the other. I have been about to pull the trigger using an Apex XD50, but feeling I could see a shadow, or something between the ears. I swapped to the XQ38, and could clearly see it was a young stag, something we were asked not to shoot.

I'm sure the same will be true of the new products. I believe the standard used for the "identification" distance, is a human figure 1.8m tall x .5m wide, but the distance you can tell the difference between it being a man, or a women, would be much closer. The better the thermal, the further away you will see the detail. How far you need, will depend on the type of shooting you do.
 

Hornady

Well-Known Member
So to summarise for the clueless among us (i.e. me!!)...

Helion XP38 - 640x480 17um sensor, range up to 1.3km, costs c.£3,300

Helion XQ38F - 384x288 17um sensor, range up to 1.3km, costs c.£2,000

Quantum Lite XQ30v - 384x288 17um sensor, range up to 900m, cost c.£1,200


On paper there seems little between the Lite and the Helion XQ38F for real world use - I don't need wifi or iPhone connectability. Or is there more to it than this? What else does the extra £800 get you, as they both seem to have the same sensor - which I'd have thought was the key to performance?
They don't have the same sensor.

They also don't have the same cpu or digital image chip.

To many people on here take math from sensor size and lenses and pixels and think that one equals another. It's like comparing a phone camera. 12mp was out 8 years ago but it looks nothing like 12mp today in a Samsung s8.

The lite has a budget core and a tiny lens. How do you think they cut the cost nearly in half in less than a year...

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

75

Well-Known Member
The lite has a budget core and a tiny lens. How do you think they cut the cost nearly in half in less than a year...
I don't know, that'ts why I was asking the question

On paper (website!) they both claim the same size sensors but nothing obvious that says they're not the same sensor. As I said, I know nothing about the tech behind these devices so thanks for your more than helpful clarification. ;)
 

Hornady

Well-Known Member
I don't know, that'ts why I was asking the question

On paper (website!) they both claim the same size sensors but nothing obvious that says they're not the same sensor. As I said, I know nothing about the tech behind these devices so thanks for your more than helpful clarification. ;)
Commercial grade stuff is notorious for missing specs and details which show how they perform. Thermal sensitivity and signal to noise are areas conveniently missing. I actually viewed this unit and compared to the Helion the image was crap. It can't tell the difference between an animal and a slightly warm log in a hedge row 200 yards away.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
Commercial grade stuff is notorious for missing specs and details which show how they perform. Thermal sensitivity and signal to noise are areas conveniently missing. I actually viewed this unit and compared to the Helion the image was crap. It can't tell the difference between an animal and a slightly warm log in a hedge row 200 yards away.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
We really need to put comparisons into context. Clearly, we would expect the more expensive unit to be better than the cheaper one. The question is, will the cheaper unit achieve what the OP needs it to ? And, if he'd been using N/V, he wouldn't even know the slightly warm log was there, which could of turned out to be a fox, boar, or deer, and a massive advantage, over not knowing anything was there at all !

So if you want a spotter for stalking, or shooting out to shorter distances, will the cheaper unit be an advantage, or disadvantage ?
 

Hornady

Well-Known Member
We really need to put comparisons into context. Clearly, we would expect the more expensive unit to be better than the cheaper one. The question is, will the cheaper unit achieve what the OP needs it to ? And, if he'd been using N/V, he wouldn't even know the slightly warm log was there, which could of turned out to be a fox, boar, or deer, and a massive advantage, over not knowing anything was there at all !

So if you want a spotter for stalking, or shooting out to shorter distances, will the cheaper unit be an advantage, or disadvantage ?
The nv will show you exactly what it is. You do realise that nv is like green day light. Especially good stuff. You can see a fox at 800 yards with a pvs14 and 3x lens.

Thermal can spot animals who are using camouflage or dense brush to hide.

The 1300 lite is a benefit if you have nothing but please don't get that model confused with the Helion range or good gen 3.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
The nv will show you exactly what it is. You do realise that nv is like green day light. Especially good stuff. You can see a fox at 800 yards with a pvs14 and 3x lens.

Thermal can spot animals who are using camouflage or dense brush to hide.

The 1300 lite is a benefit if you have nothing but please don't get that model confused with the Helion range or good gen 3.

Given the difference in pricing, it's unlikely people will get confused.
 

FISH BOY

Well-Known Member
The thread Ive been looking for to help me wade through the mine field of thermals! Cheers all. :thumb:

Now - any thoughts on the FLIR Breach?
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Don't buy a lite. I have an older XQ38 last one before the hellion came out and it a fantastic bit of kit. I don't like the Hellion.
Mines given 2 yeas of faultless performance but was £2.5k but worth every penny.

D
 

SussexFallow

Well-Known Member
My mate has the lite it does a job for a budget. If there is no budget go for the xp50 we see heat sources with his we identify them at range with mine. That’s what you pay the difference for !
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
In short the xQ38f hellion and the quantum lite are a mile apart in picture quality once you’ve used both actually in the field youlll see why
 

Top