RE land rover defender demise

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
Hi all,
Is anyone sad about the end of production of the defender models in 2015?
It is now the time to get your investments out of the pop rivet producing companies.

Shame it was not to be continued in production in India perfect for their roads and infrastructure I would have thought, I was in the plant there in Pune earlier this year and they were only producing the up market LR models.
There wasa similar anouncement about the jeep cherokee in the USA in the 90s and the outcry made them cancel the planned closure.

Maybe my lightweight that mothballed will go up a bit in value.
Martin
 

RED-DOT

Well-Known Member
Land Rover Defender, the Land Rover is to become no more a little over two years from now. There is, for the first time since 1948 – 1948! – a limited amount of time to engage with the almost limitless choices of sizes, styles and accessories and (somewhat more limited) choice of colours that Land Rover offers new buyers of the world’s oldest vehicle.

Yup, best to call it a "vehicle" as its not strictly, depending on specification, legally a car. Many variants are commercial vehicles. So while it is a rural runaround, it's also a bus, or a pick-up a bus-up-around. You choose, but choose carefully, as Land Rovers go on for ever – it is said three out of every four ever built are still on the road, somewhere in the world. Which of course means there are something like 1.5million previously loved examples out there in various states of vintage and decay. And if you are of a hipster persuasion then one of these is what you crave, its hard-earned patina and sun-flattened matte paintwork the perfect complement to the bare brick walls of your authentic loft.

And its very tempting, so long as you search first for a local mechanic to keep your old warhorse on the road for you. Then again, with an eventual lifespan of 67 years when production ends in late 2015, if you buy one new, it might still be around for your grandchildren, provided of course they’ll still be able to buy diesel in 2082.

A new Land Rover is a very different proposition from a vintage one, but don’t get me wrong, it’s a very different proposition also from anything else you can buy today. Land Rover never really evolved the Defender, not say in the way Mercedes has with the much younger G-Wagen. The latest cars have electric windows, air conditioning, a properly pokey sound system and seats that adjust more than an inch or two, but that’s it; a fistful of different keys still indicates this car is old enough to draw a pension.

So do you want one? At just over £24,000 for a three-door, Defender 90 Station Wagon of course you do. You don’t need one, it will not be your regular transport and while you would never want to contemplate travelling more than 50 miles or so in it without a break, it is unquestionably a luxury you’ll kick yourself for missing. Why? Because like much contemporary luxury it shifts your reality, your perspective and makes you jump the tracks.

It’s a little tricky to drive at first but you soon learn. All you really need to do is slow down – and since when has that been a bad idea. You see more, take in more and do more. In one glorious week in the summer with a Land Rover I made more progress with the restoration of my early Georgian house than I’ve done all year. Moving a ton-and-a-half of rock out of my back garden might not seem like luxury to you, but the way I felt after it was done most certainly did.

And that’s the point of the Land Rover. Philosophically a pure utility vehicle, it is an enabler, the original lifestyle vehicle. It won’t be the only car in your garage, but it will be the one through which you will experience the most. It will enrich your life, your friends or your family. And all this in one of the most perfect pieces of industrial design the world has yet seen.
*
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
Land Rover Defender, the Land Rover is to become no more a little over two years from now. There is, for the first time since 1948 – 1948! – a limited amount of time to engage with the almost limitless choices of sizes, styles and accessories and (somewhat more limited) choice of colours that Land Rover offers new buyers of the world’s oldest vehicle.

Yup, best to call it a "vehicle" as its not strictly, depending on specification, legally a car. Many variants are commercial vehicles. So while it is a rural runaround, it's also a bus, or a pick-up a bus-up-around. You choose, but choose carefully, as Land Rovers go on for ever – it is said three out of every four ever built are still on the road, somewhere in the world. Which of course means there are something like 1.5million previously loved examples out there in various states of vintage and decay. And if you are of a hipster persuasion then one of these is what you crave, its hard-earned patina and sun-flattened matte paintwork the perfect complement to the bare brick walls of your authentic loft.

And its very tempting, so long as you search first for a local mechanic to keep your old warhorse on the road for you. Then again, with an eventual lifespan of 67 years when production ends in late 2015, if you buy one new, it might still be around for your grandchildren, provided of course they’ll still be able to buy diesel in 2082.

A new Land Rover is a very different proposition from a vintage one, but don’t get me wrong, it’s a very different proposition also from anything else you can buy today. Land Rover never really evolved the Defender, not say in the way Mercedes has with the much younger G-Wagen. The latest cars have electric windows, air conditioning, a properly pokey sound system and seats that adjust more than an inch or two, but that’s it; a fistful of different keys still indicates this car is old enough to draw a pension.

So do you want one? At just over £24,000 for a three-door, Defender 90 Station Wagon of course you do. You don’t need one, it will not be your regular transport and while you would never want to contemplate travelling more than 50 miles or so in it without a break, it is unquestionably a luxury you’ll kick yourself for missing. Why? Because like much contemporary luxury it shifts your reality, your perspective and makes you jump the tracks.

It’s a little tricky to drive at first but you soon learn. All you really need to do is slow down – and since when has that been a bad idea. You see more, take in more and do more. In one glorious week in the summer with a Land Rover I made more progress with the restoration of my early Georgian house than I’ve done all year. Moving a ton-and-a-half of rock out of my back garden might not seem like luxury to you, but the way I felt after it was done most certainly did.

And that’s the point of the Land Rover. Philosophically a pure utility vehicle, it is an enabler, the original lifestyle vehicle. It won’t be the only car in your garage, but it will be the one through which you will experience the most. It will enrich your life, your friends or your family. And all this in one of the most perfect pieces of industrial design the world has yet seen.
*
What a good read!..... waxing lyrically over the, will it get me there in time to get me up there?!... I will treasure the T shirt. Sadly will never have another.:D
 

liongeorge

Well-Known Member
Well said Red Dot. I have owned numerous landies in the past and own an ancient yet still very useful disco today. I am sad about this news.
To all those that bang on about reliability I have a great deal to thank the 'unreliable landy' as it was through tinkering with a humble landy as a youth that I learned the basics of my trade and got me into mechanics and welding etc. I expect that I am not the only one in this position.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Well. The announcement will certainly drive sales. There is a guy in the City that sells early (60's??) Land Rovers in all different configurations. He probably has 20 of them. I'm sure his prices will go up!~Muir
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
most memorable drive to go shooting was in a landrover in the snow, from hants to north Devon, by the time we got there we were deaf and frozen, the day was spoilt by the thought of having to go home in the same vehicle.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Having driven quite a few of them over the last 30 odd years with work, it's not a vehicle that I would ever wish to drive or travel in ever again.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Red Dot you are correct, three out of every four Landrovers are still on the road luckily the fourth one made it home.

Seriously I was a Landrover fan but grew to hate them had nine in total some my own and some estate vehicles
mostly series 11As then bought a series 3 diesel total disaster back chassis legs needed welded for first M.O.T at three years old.

The 2.25 naturally aspirated diesel was both weak and uneconomical,by the time it was eight years old with a mere 90,000 on the clock it had to have the pump overhauled, it had broken a crankshaft twice , had a complete engine overhaul, the back chassis legs welded , the front chassis legs replaced outriggers replaced and the bulkhead welded.

That vehicle ended my love affair with Landrovers. I would never have another as an everyday work vehicle,could be tempted by an old series 11 as a plaything though, now that there will be no more I suppose the price of these old survivors will become even crazier than it is already.
 

Steve7046

Well-Known Member
Land Rover Defender, the Land Rover is to become no more a little over two years from now. There is, for the first time since 1948 – 1948! – a limited amount of time to engage with the almost limitless choices of sizes, styles and accessories and (somewhat more limited) choice of colours that Land Rover offers new buyers of the world’s oldest vehicle.

Yup, best to call it a "vehicle" as its not strictly, depending on specification, legally a car. Many variants are commercial vehicles. So while it is a rural runaround, it's also a bus, or a pick-up a bus-up-around. You choose, but choose carefully, as Land Rovers go on for ever – it is said three out of every four ever built are still on the road, somewhere in the world. Which of course means there are something like 1.5million previously loved examples out there in various states of vintage and decay. And if you are of a hipster persuasion then one of these is what you crave, its hard-earned patina and sun-flattened matte paintwork the perfect complement to the bare brick walls of your authentic loft.

And its very tempting, so long as you search first for a local mechanic to keep your old warhorse on the road for you. Then again, with an eventual lifespan of 67 years when production ends in late 2015, if you buy one new, it might still be around for your grandchildren, provided of course they’ll still be able to buy diesel in 2082.

A new Land Rover is a very different proposition from a vintage one, but don’t get me wrong, it’s a very different proposition also from anything else you can buy today. Land Rover never really evolved the Defender, not say in the way Mercedes has with the much younger G-Wagen. The latest cars have electric windows, air conditioning, a properly pokey sound system and seats that adjust more than an inch or two, but that’s it; a fistful of different keys still indicates this car is old enough to draw a pension.

So do you want one? At just over £24,000 for a three-door, Defender 90 Station Wagon of course you do. You don’t need one, it will not be your regular transport and while you would never want to contemplate travelling more than 50 miles or so in it without a break, it is unquestionably a luxury you’ll kick yourself for missing. Why? Because like much contemporary luxury it shifts your reality, your perspective and makes you jump the tracks.

It’s a little tricky to drive at first but you soon learn. All you really need to do is slow down – and since when has that been a bad idea. You see more, take in more and do more. In one glorious week in the summer with a Land Rover I made more progress with the restoration of my early Georgian house than I’ve done all year. Moving a ton-and-a-half of rock out of my back garden might not seem like luxury to you, but the way I felt after it was done most certainly did.

And that’s the point of the Land Rover. Philosophically a pure utility vehicle, it is an enabler, the original lifestyle vehicle. It won’t be the only car in your garage, but it will be the one through which you will experience the most. It will enrich your life, your friends or your family. And all this in one of the most perfect pieces of industrial design the world has yet seen.
*

Well put Sir!!!
im currently rebuilding a 200TDI which I hope will be with me for many years to come...
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
The outgoing Defender and the preceding Series Land Rovers are without doubt iconic vehicles. Their ability to go places other vehicles can only think of is legendary. HOWEVER...they aren't perfect. They just aren't comfortable at all, their performance on the road is (generally) asthmatic and reliability is, at best, a lottery.

Can the replacement can keep the good points and banish the bad?
 

Druid

Well-Known Member
Stuck to PVC seats in summer with the tiny little vents providing minimum ventilation. Steamed up and cold in winter with the 'heating' full on.
constant input required on the steering, barely effective wipers, no seat adjustment to speak of, vague handling the list goes on...... Good fun out in the field, not on the road.
Un ergonomic seating and don't mention the landrover deafness after a few hours.

I am afraid they have had their day.

v8's were fun though!
 

landkeeper

Well-Known Member
They have had their day i'm sorry to say ,air bag demands and emissions legislation put the writing on the wall. I wouldn't go back to any land rover made after 1998,!!! before that they were cheap to run and maintain easy to fix and would go almost anywhere if you have the balls and ability.
I still own 4 non of which are as they left the factory:D, would i swap them no way!. There will be enough land rovers around for the next 67 years too,!! without a doubt they are the ultimate recycling vehicle you can buy almost any new part you want and are a easy enough meccano set that lads will be building and rebuilding them for ever imho.
Engines and gearboxes/ t boxes are supplied by several big specialists +there are two if not three companies making replacement chassis
​the landrover defender will be like a duracell bunny it will go on and on and on and ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- infinitum
 
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charadam

Well-Known Member
Army Series 3s - what a pain in the arse - literally.

I recall some of my patrols in the early armoured variant in NI - the armour was filled sandbags on the floor. Made it difficult for the driver because of the reduced legroom and pedal access - but hey, you were sitting on 15 gallons of petrol!

But never mind - at least I had a proper rifle - L1A1 SLR.
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Red Dot you are correct, three out of every four Landrovers are still on the road luckily the fourth one made it home.

Seriously I was a Landrover fan but grew to hate them had nine in total some my own and some estate vehicles
mostly series 11As then bought a series 3 diesel total disaster back chassis legs needed welded for first M.O.T at three years old.

The 2.25 naturally aspirated diesel was both weak and uneconomical,by the time it was eight years old with a mere 90,000 on the clock it had to have the pump overhauled, it had broken a crankshaft twice , had a complete engine overhaul, the back chassis legs welded , the front chassis legs replaced outriggers replaced and the bulkhead welded.

That vehicle ended my love affair with Landrovers. I would never have another as an everyday work vehicle,could be tempted by an old series 11 as a plaything though, now that there will be no more I suppose the price of these old survivors will become even crazier than it is already.

The biggest problem with LandRover is that they are not made my Toyota!

I took a new Defender for a test drive the other week, and the driving position is still as uncomfortable as it was 20 years ago!

While on a stalking trip in the early 90's I came across a "hybrid" which was basically an old Range Rover chassis and floor plan, with a Defender body on top. I believe the chassis needed serious modification, but the results were well worth it, and I believe its the vehicle the Defender should have been. This particular one had a V8 engine, but I think in a production vehicle something like the old 2.8TD Diahatsu lump would have been better, or even the 2.9TD Merc derived one that was in the early Korando.
 

Druid

Well-Known Member
III series.
​I Always wondered who could possibly be responsible for a design that included lifting off your seat pad, unscrewing an unfeasibly large screw down cap and pouring lots of petrol into the underarse tank. Then just popping the pad back on and heading on your merry way into god knows what!

mind you it was entertaining to put the little lever between your legs that swapped the fuel feed from one tank to another into the middle (neither tank) position and watch em get 50 yards down the road and stutter to a halt (for added hilarity always save until someone commissioned needed to use the wagon. "Must have kicked it with your heel sir"
 
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