Recommendations for Knive/bone saw starter sets

Primer

Well-Known Member
I'm hopefully going to go to the shooting show on Sunday and remember from previous visits that there are normally a few sellers selling knives and want to add a few more bits to my stalking kit and I would like some recommendations for a starter set of knives/bone saw for both out in the field for bleeding and gralloching and also a butchery set, i'm not looking at spending silly money though.

Thanks in Advance
 

palmer_mike

Well-Known Member
Mora clipper are great for gralloch knives (I also use one for most of my skinning and butchery as well, lol)
inhave a gerber ez saw not sure if these are still available but it's very similar to the bushwear one.
 

NeilG

Well-Known Member
Check out Monarch Country Supplies as they have a good range of kit you are looking for at good prices. Rob is very helpful, and gives very good advice. If you don`t see anything at the fair, bear them in mind.
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
I'm hopefully going to go to the shooting show on Sunday and remember from previous visits that there are normally a few sellers selling knives and want to add a few more bits to my stalking kit and I would like some recommendations for a starter set of knives/bone saw for both out in the field for bleeding and gralloching and also a butchery set, i'm not looking at spending silly money though.

Thanks in Advance
As said above, the Frosts Mora Clipper is an excellent all-round knife. If you can, try to get one with the flourescent orange handle.

Regarding saws, for gralloching in the field the only one I'd comfortably recommend is the Sagen saw.

The only knife I might then consider adding is a skinner. I've tried several over the years but I still go back to my original Buck 103: 103 Skinnerâ„¢ Knife - Buck Knives OFFICIAL SITE

I would strongly endorse NeilG's comments regarding Monarch Country Supplies. I ordered an Outdoor Edge Zip-Pro knife from Rob last Friday and it arrived in Saturday morning's post. Top advice and top service to go with it :thumb:
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
EKA swing blade knife is superb and I have a castrum (SP) boan saw which is good too

Best to have two knives incase one gets contaminated I baught an expensive one but wish id just baught another EKA

Keeps its edge well and the sheith is excelent

Watched Robin to a gralock with an inexpensive Opinell and that was impresive



ATB
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
Sagen bone saw 2 bought from mmbeatle on here does the job well. As for knives, hultafors does nice cheap 4" or so sheath knife that holds a good edge.
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
For a saw B&Q you do not need one in the field 2 for £10, as to a knife, the best you can afford,buy cheap buy twice
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
For a saw B&Q you do not need one in the field 2 for £10, as to a knife, the best you can afford,buy cheap buy twice
I'm inclined to disagree.

I spent many years cutting the breastbone in the field with my knife, but then realised that (a) I was blunting my knife, and (b) it was actually easier with a small saw.

Regarding cheap knives, if I'm honest I'd be hard pushed to tell the difference in performance between a Mora Clipper and my Alan Wood or Stu Mitchell customs. Sure, they are beautiful knives and using them is a real pleasure, but is there a tangible difference, at least when it comes to gralloching one or two deer in the field per outing? IMHO it's like the difference between using a Bic biro and a Montblanc 149 to sign a cheque - both will achieve the objective but one makes the journey getting there a whole lot more enjoyable.

What a blessing there's no right answer for questions like this....
 

MARCBO

Account Suspended
I have a couple of "What-A-Saw"s and am very impressed with their versatility and compactness when folded. They come with three blades and will do pretty much everything a hunter needs but I rarely carry one while hunting. I have gone the custom knife route and come back to using mostly production knives now as I grow more impatient and unlikely to wait two years for a new one. Currently I am using in most cases an Ontario copy of the WWII Army Quartermaster's knife. It is plenty stout and holds a good edge.

SS
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
WG I have to agree, in some ways, on the knives apart from the ability to keep a edge without sharpening, as to a saw I don,t split the chest bone in the field .
 

Uncle Buck

Well-Known Member
Clipper "cheap as chips" if you loose it buy another one...
better still get two in the first place. Sagen 1 bone saw
perfect for roe, if your into reds get a Sagen 2 (longer saw).
Both get the job done adequately.

Buck.

Ps....as already said don't split ribcage in field..but still
a handy piece of kit.
 
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Primer

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the info guys, I will have a look at what monarch has to offer before going to the show.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't bother with a complete field butchery kit, just buy what you need!
The Mora knife is excellent. Buy about 3 stainless ones with orange handles and you'll be sorted!
Having had both models, I don't rate the Sagen saws at all! The teeth are too small and the blade is carbon steel which is high maintenance. The plastic tips crack and break up fairly quickly too.
I've tried most saws and the clastrum seems to be the best so far although the yellow ones sold by the BDS are also excellent.
I would also add a wide gaped gut hook blade. These are the only 3 tools you should need in the field.
MS
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
I've tried most saws and the clastrum seems to be the best so far although the yellow ones sold by the BDS are also excellent
MS

Do you mean the Casstrom saw Casstrom No 7 field saw - Black - Casstrom UK ? If so, sadly my experience is the opposite to yours, as I have tried the Casstrom and after only a couple of uses had the blade snap by the handle when I was gralloching a roe doe. The idea of a replaceable blade is a good one, but IMHO the design of the fastening could be improved significantly, not just because the holes for the screws weaken the blade but also because it is a bit of a germ trap. To be fair, after corresponding with the company on the above they sent me both a replacement blade and a replacement saw, so I certainly couldn't fault their service, but having bought the Sagen I personally prefer that design. Once again, each to the their own.

I bought the Zip-Pro instead as the gut hook blade, and it will get it's first outing later today so I'll be interested to see how it performs. It's a folder, which is my least favourite design, but that aside it looks like it should do the job.
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
Yep - that's it except mine is orange and has the longer blade (orange No. 11), although to be fair I've only used it on a few smallish animals so far. It seems fairly robust and will hopefully stand the test of time, but only time will tell!
MS
My mistake - mine is an 11 as well. For some obscure reason I have the replacement one sitting here on my shelf in the office!
 

Dawnraider

Well-Known Member
Another vote for the sagen saw 2, I've had mine for years the plastic tip cracked so I removed it completely and actually find it easier to use without it, just doesn't seem to lose it's edge, use it for small butchery jobs but have a decent camlock butchers saw for more demanding stuff. Knives tend to be more of a personal thing, I use a buck with a gut hook for all field work and skinning but most people just don't get on with them, if your prone to losing things then as others have suggested mora clippers are a good choice.
 

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