Reducing my plastic footprint - Phase 2: Flossing hoop

zambezi

Well-Known Member
For some time now I have been actively reducing the amount of plastic I use in life. Gratuitous and short-life items in particular. This planet needs every help we can give it. Phase one involved me giving up my Nespresso machine. Even if those capsules are recycled, the energy and other waste in their production is hard to justify and easy to live without. And so on to phase 2:

Flossing hoop

I have gappy teeth. They need frequent flossing to remain separate entities. Floss tape or thread are ok, but I struggle to adequately address the back teeth on account of fingers being bigger than my mouth. Cue the solution: flossing hoops. Sold at Boots chemists. They do an excellent job. But they are a use once piece of plastic to be added to the landfill mountain.

So I resolved to make a re-usable flossing hoop out of stainless steel. Donor steel came from claw saved from failed weed-puller. Here follow some images to show progress so far. I will post final finish in a few days.IMG_3348.JPG

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deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
Good in theory and commendable, but I’d hazard something like that made of metal would be pretty unpleasant in the mouth when it knocks against a tooth etc. Would it not have been equally sustainable and probably more comfortable to have embarked on this project with a piece of wood or bamboo?
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
Good in theory and commendable, but I’d hazard something like that made of metal would be pretty unpleasant in the mouth when it knocks against a tooth etc. Would it not have been equally sustainable and probably more comfortable to have embarked on this project with a piece of wood or bamboo?
Any porous organic material will clag over time and harbour bacteria. And I am confident that I will be able to machine off any rough edges. For the rest: unlike my dentist, I will not be thrusting the hoop into my mouth at speed and doubt I will touch any teeth with the steel after two or three practise runs. [I do not believe that the plastic hoops touch teeth currently]
 

Hornet 6

Well-Known Member
So last century, Interdental brushes is what you should be using, in whatever sizes you need.
You only need worry when the dentist hands you a pink one, and says 'that one' if for doing down between the root and gum so you can reach right down to tip of the root.

Neil.
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
...you have saved the world...
You titter now, but I bet you don't have an invite to Greta's next fundraiser, huh?


:)


Joking aside, I am hugely convicted of our corporate rape of the only home humanity has. The sum of many individual actions is far greater than any one puny act, be that positive or negative activity. I am retired now and have time to consider and act on aspects of my life that I can modify positively. That seems like wisdom. Nay, it sounds like our duty.

BBC One - Blue Planet II, Series 1, Our Blue Planet, The dangers of plastic in our oceans

















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zambezi

Well-Known Member
...the length of plastic floss used has now increased so causing an increased risk to all mammals/birdlife...
LOL. True, my hoop uses more floss than does Boot's plastic hoop. But the length of floss required for the stainless hoop to work is still shorter than the length I need to secure purchase around my fat fingers if I attempt to floss sans hoop. Plus, there are silk and bamboo based flosses out there which I plan to trial on my stainless appliance. A fully biodegradeable floss solution looks possible.
 

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
I stopped buying shaving foam/gel in tins or plastic tubes and got some shaving soap and brush. The lump of soap has lasted for nearly 2 yrs, which represents a lot of wasted packaging and transport waste. If I wasnt using disposable razors, I'd consider myself quite green in the bathroom.
Shower gel and bottled soap instead of bars of soap are another entirely avoidable source of waste.
Household plastic packaging gets my goat. Especially the deliberately wasteful type designed for marketing purposes to be more prominent on the shelf.
 

Fishpond

Well-Known Member
I stopped buying shaving foam/gel in tins or plastic tubes and got some shaving soap and brush. The lump of soap has lasted for nearly 2 yrs, which represents a lot of wasted packaging and transport waste. If I wasnt using disposable razors, I'd consider myself quite green in the bathroom.
Shower gel and bottled soap instead of bars of soap are another entirely avoidable source of waste.
Household plastic packaging gets my goat. Especially the deliberately wasteful type designed for marketing purposes to be more prominent on the shelf.
I've done the same - childhood memories of pears soap had omitted my remembering your skin feeling like rubber afterwards though due to pH difference so now switched to Dove. Canned shaving foam also phased out as it's just the same using shaving soap or cream and lasts longer.

Just makes sense when you look at how much you get through in a year!

I don't floss much to my dentists annoyance but like the ingenuity!

Richard

Sent from my SM-J510FN using Tapatalk
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
LOL. True, my hoop uses more floss than does Boot's plastic hoop. But the length of floss required for the stainless hoop to work is still shorter than the length I need to secure purchase around my fat fingers if I attempt to floss sans hoop. Plus, there are silk and bamboo based flosses out there which I plan to trial on my stainless appliance. A fully biodegradeable floss solution looks possible.
Only jesting, good on yer.
 

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