Reloading and warranty

IP freely

Well-Known Member
Looking at buying a brand new centrefire rifle for the first time and I noted that manufactures warranties often specify that they would be void through use of reloaded ammunition. I can understand why they would say that, but has anyone had any experience, directly or otherwise, of a modern rifle failing through reloaded ammo? Presumably, it would be fairly easy for a manufacturer to establish as the chamber would have gone pop! To be clear, I would not load the ammunition myself, I would source through someone like David at DMC
 

Milligan

Well-Known Member
I'm sure it happens but I am not sure how readily one could tell if it was a homeload vs. factory and lets be clear, factory ammo fails to.
If you're buying ammo from someone you'd have recourse through them (and their insurance) but in the grand scheme of things I don't think it's something to lose sleep over.
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
I have had this with a few rifles. I always use a couple f box's of factory then if all ok with the rifle, work your load..
 

banus

Well-Known Member
good afternoon, as far as i am aware all rifles in the uk have to be proofed and i would think that no sane person would reload to pressures any where near proof loads so you should be good to go
 

IP freely

Well-Known Member
As I said, would be buying ammo from someone reputable who knows what they are doing so don’t foresee any problems. But interesting; how might a manufacturer go about proving a failure was due to a particular ammunition?

I would also run some factory beforehand as suggested
 

Miki

Well-Known Member
Just out of interest, why would you use a third party to reload ?
Does it work out cheaper ?
How can you work up a load that suits your rifle this way ?
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
Personally I’ve never cared or concerned myself with weapons mfr warranty’s.
Rarely have I ever bought factory ammunition, in earlier times it was always inconsistent and frankly, I’ve been reloading so long I wouldn’t even consider doing so now, new rifle or not.
However, I’m quite sure ammunition manufacturers have upped their quality standards these days.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
I buy one box of factory, I then run it in with that and test if it can hold some a sort of zero or group . Only then do I moved to Home loads ,this is due only to I know they like to wiggle should it not perform as sold .
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
But interesting; how might a manufacturer go about proving a failure was due to a particular ammunition?
Most likely through metallurgical examination of the fracture sites and chemical analysis of the surfaces. Failure mode can almost always be identified through examination, and they'd be able to pin-point the pressures at which the failure propagated. Then correlate those results with theoretical over-pressure data and they'd have a pretty good handle on who to point the missing fingers at . . .
 

hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
Best advice I can think of is 'roll your own' carefully and never use OPs (other peoples).
I had a revolver come into my possession with some home loaded target rounds and I had the presence of mind to pull a couple of bullets and measure the loads. They had used Bullseye (the fastest powder on the market, 3.5gr for a .357) and had doubled the load. :eek:
Another case was at a club where a shooter challenged a dealer who was shooting that day; about the rifle they had bought off him. It had blown up. The dealer dismissed it with: "You should be more careful when reloading".
The rejoinder was: "I bought the reloaded ammo from you, you &*%t!" :finger:
 

booradley

Well-Known Member
Most likely through metallurgical examination of the fracture sites and chemical analysis of the surfaces. Failure mode can almost always be identified through examination, and they'd be able to pin-point the pressures at which the failure propagated. Then correlate those results with theoretical over-pressure data and they'd have a pretty good handle on who to point the missing fingers at . . .
Neither I or people I know who reload worry about it. I’ve sent in a Weatherby Vanguard for warranty work that had reloads run through it. The only reason a manufacturer would do the testing described in the above quote would be if there were pressure signs or a catastrophic failure. If you send a rifle in for warranty work for an issue such as extraction problems for example, nothing is going to happen.
 
Last edited:

Top