removing the sinue on sirloin

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Fursty Ferret

Well-Known Member
Do you have to remove the white coating/sinue (spelling!!??) Off the back side of the sirloin stake?
This seems a nigh on impossible task without a filleting knife or do i just need practice. Im quessing it will be very tough or even "curl" when cooked if not removed
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
I normally lie the sirloin with the sinew side down and run a filleting knife along the whole length of it applying pressure from on top with my other hand. There is a small amount of wastage initially but with practice you can get thinner and more accurate cutting,Mand eventually just the sinew off.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
As Deer stalker says
​Separate a small amount (enough to hold with fingers) of sinew off the meat
Turn it over so the sinew is on the board
Place knife flat between sinew and meat
Pull sinew towards you.

It should just peel off as the pressure of your knife holds the sinew to the board. Prob some you tube shots somewhere
 

AdrianC

Well-Known Member
I normally do it the other way up with a flexible blade filleting knife. Make sure it's sharp, run the knife in just under the sinew, across the meat, tilt the blade up slightly and then run it down the length of the meat. Go back to the other end and trim off the bit still joined.

You might need to trim any bits you missed off but I find I get better control and don't cut into the meat so much doing it this way.

Here's a video, watch from 3.20 onwards for the sirloin part.

 

csl

Administrator
Site Staff
I normally do it the other way up with a flexible blade filleting knife. Make sure it's sharp, run the knife in just under the sinew, across the meat, tilt the blade up slightly and then run it down the length of the meat. Go back to the other end and trim off the bit still joined.

You might need to trim any bits you missed off but I find I get better control and don't cut into the meat so much doing it this way.

Here's a video, watch from 3.20 onwards for the sirloin part.


​This is how I do it too :thumb:
 

limulus

Well-Known Member
I normally do it the other way up with a flexible blade filleting knife. Make sure it's sharp, run the knife in just under the sinew, across the meat, tilt the blade up slightly and then run it down the length of the meat. Go back to the other end and trim off the bit still joined.

You might need to trim any bits you missed off but I find I get better control and don't cut into the meat so much doing it this way.

Here's a video, watch from 3.20 onwards for the sirloin part.


+1 Same way for me too.
 

Devon County Shooter

Well-Known Member
This was the question, i was going to ask tonight after butchering the animal earlier today, wish there was a magic machine out there that did it perfectly?
 
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