resizing cases

rab

Well-Known Member
hi could anyone offer some information on resizing my brass cartridge cases. i have tried two different die's but i am finding it very tight when closing the bolt over have i missed anything?:(
 

Lee303

Well-Known Member
Closing the bolt difficult? So your rounds are not quite right for sure.

Full length check of a built round with a vernier is required first....
 

Wolverine

Well-Known Member
I would also be checking your OAL for your rifle,it could be different to the ogive of the bullet to the SAMMI OAL in your rifle
 

Bryan_C

Active Member
Rab, I agree with Lee303 - you need to do a full length check. But first check a resized case in your rifle - chamber a resized BUT unloaded case in your rifle. If it is difficult to close the bolt, then your die is set up incorrectly. If the bolt closes without any problems, then your seating depth is wrong.

Hope that helps - fire back if you are still having problems.

Bryan
 

palo

Well-Known Member
Give us some more info like JCS says.
I have helped out a few mates with this problem when full length sizing.
The problem was that the die was not screwed down far enough and whenever they sized a case it pushed the shoulder forward.
You should set up the die so that it sets the shoulder back one or two thousands.
Hornady make a good tool for the job.
 

rab

Well-Known Member
hi more info i am using lee and rcbs die's. the brass i have been using is federal and lapua. i have been loading for a sauer 202 and a tikka t3 both in .243. when i have been trying to close the bolt over it is tight but it will close with not excessive force.as for the case lenth when trimming the cases there is very little brass coming off the neck so the necks cant be streched.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
rab

Thanks for the info. Some more questions:

1 How are you keeping the spent brass from each rifle separate?
2 Do you have a resizing die dedicated to each rifle?
3 Which rifle has the smaller chamber?

Regards JCS
 

rab

Well-Known Member
the cases are kept seperate as the t3 is my mates i use the lapua and he is using spent federal cases he used before he started reloading.the cases are tight on both rifles but they were ok on the last batch of bullets i made for each of the rifles. i have only made bullets for each rifle at any one time so as there is no mixups with cases ect.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
rab

I think you need to address the rifles individually. Forget about your mate's rifle at present and concentrate on your own one. You have a nice rifle and good brass. Work with the resizing die until you are happy that the die is just bumping the shoulder enough for your Lapua cases.

Focus on your own rifle and your own loads first. I am sure Muir later on will have some measured comments to add to the thread.

Best regards JCS.
 

dodgyrog

Well-Known Member
I use brass from any source that I can get cheaply and consequently find the cases tight in rifle chambers where they didn't get their first firing.
A cure (I have found) for the .308 and 30-06 family of cases is to push them completely through a 45ACP carbide die modified to permit their passage through the die.
I use my Corbin swaging press to hold this die and have a special 'pusher' made to assist in the operation.
Magma make a machine that does this operation on 9mm brass.
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
I use brass from any source that I can get cheaply and consequently find the cases tight in rifle chambers where they didn't get their first firing.
A cure (I have found) for the .308 and 30-06 family of cases is to push them completely through a 45ACP carbide die modified to permit their passage through the die.
I use my Corbin swaging press to hold this die and have a special 'pusher' made to assist in the operation.
Magma make a machine that does this operation on 9mm brass.
That sounds expensive and complicated !
I have loaded many hundreds of cases of various calibres including those mentioned after re-sizing through my normal RCBS dies. I have neck sizer dies also but do not use them as I re-load for four other persons.

HWH.
 

dodgyrog

Well-Known Member
That sounds expensive and complicated !
I have loaded many hundreds of cases of various calibres including those mentioned after re-sizing through my normal RCBS dies. I have neck sizer dies also but do not use them as I re-load for four other persons.

HWH.
I trust you are a Registered Firearms Dealer and have the appropriate licences and your ammunition is submitted for proof!
 

PKL

Well-Known Member
Rab,

Check the primers are not seated too far out! stand the ammo upright and see if it wobbles or stands solid. If the primer's sticking out you're goosed and the bolt won't close......learned that one the hard way ;)

Edit...assuming you mean 'bolt' won't close when you try to chamber the round...
 
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Lightyear

Well-Known Member
hi could anyone offer some information on resizing my brass cartridge cases. i have tried two different die's but i am finding it very tight when closing the bolt over have i missed anything?:(
Are you full length or neck sizing ??

I have found my neck sized cases require a firmer hand to close the bolt than my full length resized cases which slip in quite easily !!!

I now neck size really quite close to the shoulder and all seems good.

Cheers + ATVB

Philip
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
I have a Tikka M595 .243 and use Lee dies. I get a 'nip' closure on most acquired Once-fired cases, but not strangely enough on the collet neck-sized cases I use from all sorts of factory rounds fired by me. I haven't paid for a single round of factory ammo for 20 years which upsets the FLD, but people do keep changing calibres or even give up shooting.

Tikka chambers are tight. I say this because I have quite a few Tikka's. All of them need cases full length resized right down to the shellholder. Try full contact.... be brutal.

If you're using cases fired in a donor rifle, it's entirely possible that the dies aren't resizing the last few millimetres of the case head above the shellholder enough. There is an unsized section of case between where the die 'ring mark' appears and the extraction groove begins. This expanded bit is enough to prevent easy chambering.

I've had this problem with belted magnum cases where a tiny section just forward of the belt swells, and isn't squeezed down again by the FLR die. They all differ by brand.

What you could also check is what brand of shellholder you're using. These have different thicknesses to complement the same-brand dies they're meant to be used with.
Try switching to something different, as this is cheaper than restocking on diesets. this might work.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I would also ask if these cases are FL resized or only neck sized. The advice to try a resized case in your rifle is a good one. If you are FL resizing, and the case is still a little sticky, screw the die down onto the shell-holder a little harder and try a case to see how it fares. I don't think an over sized base is the problem since the brass is segregated to the rifle it was fired in, correct??~Muir
 

j0e_bl0ggs

Well-Known Member
I use brass from any source that I can get cheaply and consequently find the cases tight in rifle chambers where they didn't get their first firing.
A cure (I have found) for the .308 and 30-06 family of cases is to push them completely through a 45ACP carbide die modified to permit their passage through the die.
I use my Corbin swaging press to hold this die and have a special 'pusher' made to assist in the operation.
Magma make a machine that does this operation on 9mm brass.
Dodgy, can you explain how this helps please?
I do not see it myself...tapered case and a parallel 'swage'.
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
I recently had a similar problem, reloaded ammo (not by me) were getting very tight and it was almost impossble to close the bolt on my H-S Precision 243. In this case it turned out to be dirt build up. I gave the bolt and chamber a severe cleaning and the pronblem was solved.
I always keep the rifle clean but obviously not clean enough! Might be worth a try.
 

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