Retired HGV driver fascinated by the site content

Welcome buddy,

Glad I’m retired from it too ! Too much Bulls—t and H and S.
Thank you. A classic example of this is the Driver CPC, 5 x 7hr classroom sessions over 5 years every 5 years, however you can take the same module 5 times in a week and you've qualified but if you are pulled in for a check and you don't have that CPC card on you it's a massive fine even though, thanks to todays technology, they can check on their laptops anyway. It's another example of a clueless jobsworth wreaking havoc in an already heavily regulated transport industry
 

Ronin

Distinguished Member
Welcome to the site

Started out with class one when I was 20 and worked for variety of hauliers doing Irish group age and fridge work for ten years

F88’s, Scania 111, 112 and 142 finally with a larger outfit with Mercedes (powershift box which was awful)

Memorable and fun days with less emphasis on speed limits and drivers hours than was healthy …..

Moved to another career for 25 yrs

In that period set up a small business doing rifle work and some contract culling which I still do for existing clients

But also come full circle returned to doing some Class one work due to the extraordinary pay offered - had to do cpc which was frankly easy and now on vehicles that almost drive themselves - as you say , very little camaraderie with drivers , standards of driving seem pretty poor woth some of the hauliers I see
 
Welcome to the site

Started out with class one when I was 20 and worked for variety of hauliers doing Irish group age and fridge work for ten years

F88’s, Scania 111, 112 and 142 finally with a larger outfit with Mercedes (powershift box which was awful)

Memorable and fun days with less emphasis on speed limits and drivers hours than was healthy …..

Moved to another career for 25 yrs

In that period set up a small business doing rifle work and some contract culling which I still do for existing clients

But also come full circle returned to doing some Class one work due to the extraordinary pay offered - had to do cpc which was frankly easy and now on vehicles that almost drive themselves - as you say , very little camaraderie with drivers , standards of driving seem pretty poor woth some of the hauliers I see
Back in the early 90's Merc gave us a demonstrator for a few months and at first drivers used to turn up early to try and get it. Word got round about the gearbox and the falling books and all of a sudden drivers weren't too interested in the novelty of hitting a roundabout, slapping the shift sideways then back and the correct gear selecting relative to the speed, they were more interested in getting home which wasn't guaranteed with that gearbox.
 

african jack

Well-Known Member
Me too, I've played many a tune on a 13 speed Fuller Road Ranger and being on grain I had my share of beautiful scenic roads, the trouble was the bloody hills. On more than one occasion I've missed it, had to stop and then crawl up the hill, one belter was going to Carrs at Siloth, many a driver came to a stop on there and then had to roll back down to a flatter section to set off again. One cracker of a trip was tip at Chancelot mills on Leith docks then down to St Boswells to load oats and then instead of taking them to Crewe I took them back to Knottingley for the weekend. Friday afternoon, steady ride back down the A68 to Darlington to get on the A1 and admire the scenery, bloody hell, my left leg and shoulder felt like I'd been trampled
must have worked for allied mills chancelot knottingley I worked at both
 

grimstone

Active Member
From the early 80's I drove a Volvo F86, Atkinson Borderer, Leyland Comet, Dodge, Seddon Atkinson, Foden, Scania, MAN, Volvo and finished on a DAF which incidentally has the best mattress in the world. I started off roping and sheeting flats until a tautliner trailer was purchased, all the units were 2nd, 3rd, 4th hand and even more.
I got the Foden and Scania which were bought brand new, 2 or 3 per year with a grain company pulling tippers. The MAN came when I moved to a supermarket pulling fridges and dry boxes, the fleet was replaced 60-70 at a time every 3 years with spot hired units filling in at busy times like Easter and Christmas, you usually drove what you were given and over the years we were able to drive just about anything because companies broke their necks to get their units in on trial pulling our trailers. Eventually I moved off fridges and into a dedicated ambient warehouse driving Volvos, Scanias and DAFs pulling boxes and tautliners the majority of which were double deckers running at 44 tonnes. Fortunately I had co-operative transport managers and was given the same unit most days which was a DAF XF 106 the nearest thing to a Foden these days. I was brought up on trucks, my dad and his brother were drivers and I was with him every weekend and school holiday in the 60's & 70's but nowadays it's a different game with an 'I'm alright Jack attitude' and too many rules and regulations not to mention the fact that the majority of the public hate us and the roads are full of morons who don't understand the needs of a truck on the road and so their lack of understanding means the truck driver is always in the wrong in their eyes.
I wouldn't advise anyone to go into road haulage these days, too much regulation and no camaraderie.
It’s changed immeasurably! Not the same same industry now. Years ago we’d have drivers that had an airbag blow or hub seize and first we’d know is when the driver turned up with his axle chained up and air bags capped. Nowadays young lads have a bulb go or can’t tune their radio and are straight on the phone. Or if you get a driver who knows what to do hes soon got a copper or dvsa lad trying to fine him for doing his job. The drivers on the road today don’t get half the help, conditions and respect they deserve. Hat off to you mate. Enjoy the forum!
 
It’s changed immeasurably! Not the same same industry now. Years ago we’d have drivers that had an airbag blow or hub seize and first we’d know is when the driver turned up with his axle chained up and air bags capped. Nowadays young lads have a bulb go or can’t tune their radio and are straight on the phone. Or if you get a driver who knows what to do hes soon got a copper or dvsa lad trying to fine him for doing his job. The drivers on the road today don’t get half the help, conditions and respect they deserve. Hat off to you mate. Enjoy the forum!
I started in transport riding with my dad, on cold mornings I've pushed burning rags on a pole into the air intake (filter removed) while my dad turned the engine over. When it started, rag out, filter back in, clips on and in the cab quick, windows up, doors shut and my grans peg rugs, that were used on the hump to deaden the engine noise, were thrown over me to warm me up and allow the heat from the engine to get in the cab, About 15-20 years ago at the supermarket RDC we were told we weren't even allowed to change a bulb, instead an outside company were called out to change them and I believe at that time it was £85 call out and about £20 labour, you don't have to be too intelligent to do the maths on that for one depot alone with about 70 units and 100 trailers. I understand it was all because someone had tried to remove a rusted in bulb which then burst and cut his thumb, stitches required and a 'no win no fee' solicitor. Can you imagine todays H & S reps back in the 60's and 70's?, I can't.
 

Fox Tales

Well-Known Member
Give them a “round the corner Eaton crash box” and they’d crap themselves!!!

Ah, the old "twin split", 12 forward gears , 36 neutrals and an ERF with a glass fibre cab .The strongest part of which was possibly the mirror arm . Oh , how I miss them 😢. Every hill climb was a challenge and had you on the edge of your seat . Every hill decent , had you holding the door ajar just in case you needed to tuck and roll , should the drum brakes fade and fail ..

I heard my old manager remark once that the twin split was the best gearbox ever made . It goes without saying he wasn't a driver .
 
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