Rifling.

acj375

Well-Known Member
Hi Southern was writing about rifling 5r ,does rifling vary on different makes of rifle,i read lee enfield ,can have 2,or 5.
I ask becaues a target shooter was saying a 5 rifled barrel had improved his shooting.
Also 45deg and 90deg rifling .
is there a norm .
Thanke ACJ.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
5R rifling was developed by the USSR for some of their sniper rifles.

It has been used before in the USA, by barrel makers, for target rifles, like F-Class. It is used by Remington on the M24 for the US Army and some tactical rifles.

The idea is that the odd number off lands and grooves places the lands and grooves opposite each other, instead of across from each other, reducing the deformation of the bullet and friction. Additionally, 5R usually has the rifling rounded on the edges, instead of a sharp squared off cut.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I've seen 'em all. Two groove, four groove, five groove, six groove. Seven groove and, yes, even ten groove.

There's little real world difference for practical purposes and a Marlin 94 (with ten groove micro rifling) and a Winchester 94.

SMLE rifles, I think, used five groove save BSA WWII made that used six groove.

But in practical terms there's no difference in accuracy.

Save that Marlin found that micro rifling didn't work as well with jacketed bullets as with lead bullets.
 
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Laurie

Well-Known Member
Save that Marlin found that micro rifling didn't work as well with jacketed bullets as with lead bullets.
I think you have that the wrong way round. Micro-groove rifling has a reputation for working well with jacketed, but not with cast lead bullets. Actually, over time, people found ways of making it work well with lead too, but it is much less tolerant of metal alloy hardness than conventional rifling.

These problems and the consumer's perception of them led Marlin to change to conventional ('Ballard' form) rifling in later M1894s, the M1895 and 444, whilst the 35 Rem and .30-30WCF 336s stayed Micro-groove as these deerhunting rifles would usually employ jacketed bullet ammunition.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Doh! Yes, I did! Thank you for the timely correction. Micro groove was indeed for the then new Remington 240 JSP and JHP .44 Magnum. Good thing on this Forum is if you get it wrong it soon gets put right. Thanks for the input.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Again from memory S & W revolvers were/are five groove, modernish double action Colt revolvers six groove and Webley .455, I think, seven groove. But I'll stand corrected!
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
I think you have that the wrong way round. Micro-groove rifling has a reputation for working well with jacketed, but not with cast lead bullets. Actually, over time, people found ways of making it work well with lead too, but it is much less tolerant of metal alloy hardness than conventional rifling.

These problems and the consumer's perception of them led Marlin to change to conventional ('Ballard' form) rifling in later M1894s, the M1895 and 444, whilst the 35 Rem and .30-30WCF 336s stayed Micro-groove as these deerhunting rifles would usually employ jacketed bullet ammunition.
Marlin actually bought Ballard Rifle, long ago.
 

Roro

Well-Known Member
My first handgun was a glock 17. I seem to remember someone saying not to use cast lead bullets in it as the bore would become leaded and lead to very high pressures. Polygonal rifling and all that.
 

flying felix

Well-Known Member
My first handgun was a glock 17. I seem to remember someone saying not to use cast lead bullets in it as the bore would become leaded and lead to very high pressures. Polygonal rifling and all that.
You are right in that the use of uncoated lead bullets through a polygonal barrel is not recommended. The lack of lands tends to cause the bullets to slip and lead to be deposited on the barrel walls. Easily remedied by using jacketed bullets after using uncoated lead.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
There are replacement barrels you can buy, if you want to shoot cast lead bullets through your Glock.

My first HK-91A3 had a polygonal bore, and its test target was 5 shots into a cloverleaf. That was no bull, either. It really shoots.
The PSG-1 has a polygonal bore, too.
 

ileso

Well-Known Member
i also find rifling very confusing, and in part whimsical... read about just about every sort imaginable including polygonal rifling... but when it all comes down to it, does it matter?
 

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