Roe buck

limulus

Well-Known Member
Stalking a broad leaf wood that's split in two by a path. One part smaller than the other. It's 6pm and the sun is painting its dappled rays deep into the darkness of the wood. The scent of wild garlic fills the air and the understory is awash with blue bells. Catkins hang from the young willows at the edge of the wood.
Stalking slowly, stopping every few yards to scan the area with the binoculars you clear the small half of the wood in about 30mins.
Into the big wood now and it immediately feels more comfortable both for me and to my mind the deer.
Rounding the corner of a well defined path made by the keepers quad bike I pause to scan ahead.
There, no more than 35yds away is a roe doe looking towards me but not seeing me. All I saw was the twitch of her ears to give her position away. She knows something has quipped her interest but she's not sure what. The wind is in my favour and the sun is almost directly behind me so I know I have the advantage. Watching her through the binoculars I see her settle and start feeding from the brambles near her head.
Now where is her suitor? He must be near.
Scanning around I see no sign of him but stay glued to the binoculars for several minutes trying to find him. Nothing. I put the binoculars down against my chest and just take in the surrounding on a glorious evening to be out deer bothering.
Looking to my left I see something that's just not quite right and there he is. No more than 30yards away facing away from me laying in the cover near a tree is a magnificent roe buck. The 'not quite right' are the massive antlers he's sporting poking up above the cover line. Slowly I place the cross hairs onto the back of his head and watch, waiting for him to stand from his slumber and meet his end.
10minutes later he's still quite happy having the cross hairs on the back of his head and continues snoozing in the evening sunshine that's hitting him through the canopy.
I have time. I'm not shooting this buck in the head, he deserves a better end and, when he stands, I'll shoot him in the heart and have him mounted as he's one of the best bucks I've seen for a few years now.
Another 5 minutes goes by and still he doesn't move, his doe still nods her head between sleep and total awareness some 20yards or so from where he slumbers.
I cough, partly because I've been recovering from Ebola or some other exotic disease (it's not a cold as my Mrs would have you believe) and in part hoping he'd finally stand and present.
He doesn't move!
I cough again.....nothing.
I bark......nothing...a slight twitch of the ears maybe.
I decide patience is needed so continue watching him through the crosshairs knowing he must get up eventually and I'm prepared to wait until dark for this magnificent beast.
Minutes go by and, to my right, a cock pheasant sees me as he's patrolling his patch and gives its alarm call.
The buck immediately jumps up in full flight in an instant and disappears into the undergrowth with the doe only a few paces behind.
I give him a salute, he hasn't become this big by waiting to see what's caused an alarm, and on this occasion his mistakes haven't cost him his life.
In the words of Arnie.....'I'll be back'.
 

karamoja

Well-Known Member
That brought a big smile to face!! Those are the ones I always remember the most vividly and the longest.
K
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
I think that most of us are glad that it got away! It was clearly a buck in it's prime!
I appreciate that it's probably not a true story btw but you clearly have a talent for writing.:tiphat:
 
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monarman

Well-Known Member
A nice and all too familiar story there bud..... well told.

It seems our resident hygiene constable has issues with both your choice of buck and the validity of your story!...... I guess he's not just an expert on contamination but also has an intimate knowledge of your management plan along with an inbuilt lie detector that works through Internet forums which tells when someone is lying.

Next he'll be telling us that your limulus quad sticks are really a bipod and that you can't shoot a specific buck on your ground whilst using them because you only have your lock knife for the gralloch!!!!

About time someone wound their neck in and got back to fitting light sockets!!!!
 
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Dexter

Well-Known Member
A nice and all too familiar story there bud..... well told.

It seems our resident hygiene constable has issues with both your choice of buck and the validity of your story!...... I guess he's not just an expert on contamination but also has an intimate knowledge of your management plan along with an inbuilt lie detector that works through Internet forums which tells when someone is lying.

Next he'll be telling us that your limulus quad sticks are really a bipod and that you can't shoot a specific buck on your ground whilst using them because you only have your lock knife for the gralloch!!!!

About time someone wound their neck in and got back to fitting light sockets!!!!
Have a day off big man and do us all a favour! And you had to use swear words too. Good grief. You clearly need an early night and to leave this forum for people who can act like adults and control rather than embarrass themselves. Do they let you have an FAC?
 
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sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
10 day cooling off ban in place. We really don't need such posting on this site. Why people cant be more polite and not act in such a way is beyond me.
 

monarman

Well-Known Member
I hope you have success this time bud... look forward to the next installment with perhaps the added bonus of a picture?;)
 

monarman

Well-Known Member
Is the far right one a four pointer????......

In 21 years of stalking I've yet to shoot a four pointer!.... I'd pass the chance of any medal for a good four point buck!
 

limulus

Well-Known Member
Take two....
after a very enjoyable walk around the northern shooting show on Saturday I made my way to the stalking ground to try and find this buck again.
To set the scene somewhat imagine a wood of deciduous trees interspersed with glades of bluebells surrounded by prime farmland sporting rapeseed in full bloom on one side and flowering field beans on the other. The heady aroma of the rapeseed flower is almost cloying within the wood. This wood has an hourglass shape being only 50yards wide at the pinch of the wood but widening to quadruple that at its widest. The 'left' side as we stalk is almost a straight line with good visibility along the wood margin out to the rapeseed edge. The 'right' hand side has half moon scoops as the wood widens giving about 100yards between each apex. There's a field margin of about 6yards of lush fresh growth grass and wild flowers before the field beans start.
Stalking through the middle of the first, slightly smaller, part of the hour glass we don't see any deer. I was tempted to write we don't see anything but that would be a disservice to the nut hatches marauding for insects along the trunks of trees or the squirrels performing their acrobatic displays as they fearlessly run from tree top to tree top with total disregard for health and safety. The aroma of wild garlic as it drifts up after being crushed under foot and that heart in mouth moment when you hear something coming through the undergrowth only for a big old brock to go bumbleing through the wood without a care causing great alarm to the black birds and pheasants in its path.
We reach the pinch of the hour glass and consider moving forward or waiting it out at this vantage point until dark. The last we saw of this elusive buck was in the next part of the wood and despite the obvious advantages of staying put (something we humans seem to fail to do all too often) we stalk on into the largest, densest part of the wood.
This is proper stalking, not an armed walk. Weight transfer onto the leading foot is tested every step to ensure an errant dry twig isn't waiting to give our position away. Every five or six steps a brief pause to glass ahead. The ground cover has thickened considerably in the two weeks since we last stalked this wood and its obvious the wood edges are going to be our best chance of spotting a deer. Backtracking to the pinch of the wood we have a look on the left edge of the wood looking up the field beans crop margin. After a few minutes I spot a fallow doe making her way towards us along the wood edge. She looks in fine order and it's good to see her on this part of the estate. She makes her way towards us oblivious to our presence and when about 40yards away she silently enters back into the wood. We wait, expecting to see her walk through the pinch through the bluebell glade and into the smaller part of the wood but she doesn't appear after 15 minutes so we decide to split up with me on the left hand side of the wood viewing the straight edged rape seed side and my stalking partner, Steve, staying on the field bean edge.
I arrive at my vantage point and look back towards Steve who has suddenly taken up contortionist impersonations or is trying to get my attention to get back to the field bean side at some rate.
I get back only to see a roe buck walking away and around the first apex of the half moon shaped scoops on this side. I quickly move out into the field beans to open the angle to the inner curve of the next section and there he is marking a small branch foolish enough to be within marking height on his patch. Up on the sticks and he's in the cross hairs but not presenting for a shot. Seconds go by my mind wishing him to turn broadside but he disappears into the wood. Has he escaped again?
After several minutes with no further show on this side I go back to the other side in the hope he's marking his territory and might show there.
Again I arrive at my vantage point and look back to Steve. This time I'm in severe worry for his health. He's either stood on a wasps nest or the buck is back! I cover the 50 yards or so back to the field bean side in under two minutes only to see the buck just over two hundred yards away still making his way away. Again he disappears around the apex of the next scoop. This time we're able to stalk (read run!) to the first apex and, as I pop my head around the edge there he is. Up on the sticks, he's about 220 yards away, still walking slowly away and then he makes his mistake. He turns right looking towards the field beans and presents broad side on. Cross hairs on target and I pull the trigger.
The shot sounds good and he runs a very short distance into the field beans.
The shot site shows lots of blood and an easy blood trail leads about eight paces into the beans to find him expired.
The gralloch reveals his heart to be cleaved in two and its only now it hits me....that feeling of a job well done tinged with melancholy yet excitement too. I think it's a feeling only a hunter gets, that dichotomy of good and bad.
Back at the larder and he's shoulder skinned in readiness for the taxidermist and I make the journey home tired yet now elated at just how lucky and privileged we stalkers are.
 
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