Roe bucks casting antlers

Brittany boy

Well-Known Member
I shot my last roe Buck of the season a few days ago, he was identified as he walked away and I could see he had no anal tush but he also had no antlers. On examination following the shot I found he had two leather pads on top of his pedicels where the antlers had been . I'd never Seen this before, he was in good condition and body weight. Is this the normal,time of year to cast their antlers.
 

diverdave

Well-Known Member
I shot a wee buck this week, in an area where a lot of the bucks are poor, very thin, no fat, worn teeth. We have a small population of them we are keen to wipe out as a few hundred meters away we have really excellent animals, almost double the weight, and many are medal class. We think it is a combination of genetics and feeding in rank heather. Anyway, i had gralloched the buck, and it will have only weighed about 12 kg clean, but as i lifted it by an antler it came off, easily. The other was well attached, but i can only imagine it was due to be cast super early - like everything else this year.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I shot a good buck 6 oct last year over in Fife. It still had both antlers, but when i tried to drag it by one antler it came away in my hand. The other came off easily as well. I suspect it would have antler free within a couple of days.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Young bucks (destined never to develop further, it would appear) often cast their initial buttons early and then go on to produce normal heads roughly in line with the majority. The testosterone levels in the young react to the frost a bit quick initially!

The earliest in over thirty five seasons I shot an old buck with already cast antlers was October 12th.

Genetic integrity of roe only an issue in the Thetford and surrounding area, originally imported from Wurttenbug, Germany. The Perthshire and Aberdeenshire roe introduced into Sussex and Hants went on to do well. Though the ground is lighter, so,it is in other areas in Germany where, if left to maturity, bucks can certainly attain medal status.

A buck was shot in the Cromar some years ago with a Gold medal head, though the carcass weighed only 28lb (- 12,5kilo) Good grub (in his case game cover), peace and time was all he needed, but once they're on the deck they cannot improve on the wall.

Tall oaks from little acorns grow..
 

Acm

Well-Known Member
I think when they’re unwell or in poor condition they cast early. I shot a moose a couple of years ago who had an awful gore injury to the abdomen, very infected. As he hit the deck both of his antlers cast. ‍♂ Made him easy to take home!
 

Harry mac

Well-Known Member
Was it an old buck. When I first started stalking, the guy mentoring me used to say "the older the head, the sooner it's shed".
 

Brittany boy

Well-Known Member
Yes the buck I shot was an old beast thick neck worn teeth large pedicels it was on a bit of ground l hadn't shot for a few years after the roe were wiped out by a new boy who had gained permission from the landowner after doing some building work at the farm.

I had shot / managed the ground for 20 years and had built up a good number of beasts in good condition. The old boy was possibly one missed in the slaughter or maybe he just moved into the area after the others had been removed. Would have liked to have seen his head this summer and might have left him till next year but will never know know.
 

ChrisWill184

Well-Known Member
10th September was the earliest I have seen a roe cast and that was only last year. Older animal but not ancient. Had one antler missing when I shot it and the other came off in my hand when I dragged it off the field. Actually also shot a buck a month later in the same area about 15th October which had velvet stumps already.

Very odd up here and both bucks within a mile of each other in Aberdeenshire. Not seen the same in any other area before or again yet.
 

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