roe gralloching tips shooting show

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oowee

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Roe Stalking and Gralloching

The Shooting Show had a video on gralloching tips.
It shows sawing through the pelvic bone on a hanging gralloch to give access to the bladder and anal tract. I guess all of us have our own way of doing things but I was taught to minimise cutting into the carcass to reduce contamination. Trying to keep as much of the carcass untouched, including the chest cavity, seems a neater way to do things. I would be interested in the thoughts of those with greater knowledge.
 
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Heym SR20

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Sawing through the H bone is pretty standard practice on both Roe and Red, and also slaughtered cattle, sheep and pigs. Personally for my own freezer I don't bother, indeed I don't bother removing the bladder / uterine tract - I just take the haunches off leaving the pelvic girdle intact. But if ever I am putting into the dealer then cut the H-Bone.
 

Tom D

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Its something for the larder, or a suspended gralloch if you are then putting the carcass straight into a clean sack or tray etc. Not for doing prior to a long drag.
 

Monkey Spanker

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It’s a Scottish trait mainly. Spoils a good amount of haunch meat and completely unnecessary. Better to tunnel the back end around with a knife and just pull it through with the bladder. Much less invasive and less wasted meat.
MS
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
It’s a Scottish trait mainly. Spoils a good amount of haunch meat and completely unnecessary. Better to tunnel the back end around with a knife and just pull it through with the bladder. Much less invasive and less wasted meat.
MS

Only if ye dinna ken what ye're meant to be doing!
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
I found this video by Yorkshireroestalking to be an excellent guide and try and emulate it.


There are a couple of other videos by Jelen on YouTube which are well worth watching once or thrice.

As others have said keeping it as much intact as possible for dragging or otherwise recovering until back at the larder, seems a logical way of going about things to me.

Alan
 

oowee

Well-Known Member
That's an excellent video Alan. I like the method at the rump and will give that a go on the next one.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Absolutely no idea where you get this? How does sawing through the girdle spoil meat? And how is it a 'Scottish trait'? :-|

Only if ye dinna ken what ye're meant to be doing!

You can't saw through the Aitch bone without slicing through the skin between the haunches, which in turn exposes an awful lot of flesh!
I know many Scottish game dealers insist upon it, whereas down South some won't take them or will even deduct money for carcass damage.
It also means you can't suspend it from the Aitch bone if you shoot a really big one that is too tall for your chiller!
Red Stag 2.jpg MS
Note: That's a 2m tall chiller!!:eek:
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
You can't saw through the Aitch bone without slicing through the skin between the haunches, which in turn exposes an awful lot of flesh . . . . . . . It also means you can't suspend it from the Aitch bone

Ah, ok. I see now. I tend not to drag roe, to be honest. I use a Predator roe sack which means any exposed meat won't be subject to contamination. Funny how your own preferences can blind you to a wider picture sometimes, isn't it? And I don't get many opportunities to shoot a lot of larger deer, so the hanging from the H-bone is a non-issue for me
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Have a look at Fig 3 & 4 here and tell me how that isn't exposing a whole load of haunch flesh? Makes negligible difference to cooling compared to the thicker parts of the haunch.
http://www.thedeerinitiative.co.uk/uploads/guides/160.pdf
It's just an old tradition that some people refuse to see as bad practise with regard to modern day food hygiene standards. Nothing worse than looking at a 'spatchcocked' deer laying in a field with all the flesh exposed.

MS
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
I can never understand why anyone is against sawing the H bone as it is sometimes referred too. It does not ruin any meat, theres none on it to ruin. Besides on larger beasts it allows the whole area to cool down quicker in my opinion. Its not just a practice used in Scotland, many use it down here, including me. I have never ever had any game dealer refuse a carcase either.

Its also not the be all and end all of Level 2 either, as long as the carcase is clean it shouldn't make any difference :rolleyes:

I think we are mostly talking about larder work here. Very few estates in the highlands will carry out the whole process on an open hill. I have had people slit throats and open everything up like a tin opener and then think about dragging a stag half a mile ......... no. Bleed, green and get it back to the larder.

Cutting out the H bone is NOT bad practice in a larder.

European Stag009.jpg Try this one for size, it had to be done outside as the door wasn't big enough to get it through. No its not a park stag either!
 
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jimbo1984

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Seems another thing our resident expert might not be right about ........ for what it's worth I always cut the pelvic bone or h bone as it's called in the larder helps carcass cool and doesn't spoil meat in my opinion.
majority of what I shoot are muntjac roe and the odd fallow and red for the smaller species the throats gets opened up in the field and head and feet come off and straight into roe sack the larger ones get done in the larder
 
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Discopete

Well-Known Member
It’s a Scottish trait mainly. Spoils a good amount of haunch meat and completely unnecessary. Better to tunnel the back end around with a knife and just pull it through with the bladder. Much less invasive and less wasted meat.
MS

What MS says for gralloching in the field, a lot less meat exposed. I’m not sure why people insist on doing the Aitch bone in the field it really isn’t necessary, I can’t see any benefits to it. If it’s done in the larder what is the point aswell, people say it’s to aid cooling but it will be doing that in room temp for 24rs.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
Exposing flesh at any stage of the process other than final skinning and butchery is not a good idea, even when back in the larder. Most chillers have re-circulatory air systems which will blow dirt around and effectively dry and spoil any exposed meat which will then need to be cut away and disposed of. This is why hanging skinned deer alongside deer in-fur is not an acceptable food standard. The skin is the best protective there is. Leave it secured as much and for as long as possible!
MS
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Ohh come on. When did you ever have to cut away part of the meat because the H bone had been cut out and the deer was hanging in the chiller in the jacket. Blowing dirt around, the chiller should be washed out and disinfected and clean anyway. And who mentioned hanging skinned deer next to ones in the fur anyway, we all know that's not good practice.

I think a bit of common sense needs to be applied at times.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Personally I cut a section about 1" wide out of the H bone when I'm gralloching in the larder - Makes it easier to get everything out and helps speed up the cooling process.

And theres no risk of contamination because you're already in the larder and doing the gralloch suspended. Its just guts out and into the chiller.

Never had an issue or complaint with it and most of ours go to the game dealer.

In the field what I do depends on how far I need to travel back and how I'm travelling. If its a long drag then minimal cuts only, if its going into the back of a pickup then I'd open it up more.
 
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Alantoo

Well-Known Member
That's an excellent video Alan. I like the method at the rump and will give that a go on the next one.

It is good isn't it. Not a wasted movement. Very elegant. Someone (I think it was Apache, or maybe Paul at Fechan), that had been on a stalk with YDS/ John Robson and timed him at less than 5 minutes for full gralloch from start to finish!

The only modification/addition to the method I have been making recently is to recover the cable ties before gralloch disposal, having been thoughtfully admonished by Sauer regarding littering the countryside with plastic.

Alan
 
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