Roe with injured rib

J111

Well-Known Member
Afraid I don't have a photo but shot a roe with a broken rib and a bit of the rib actually poking out through the skin. Rib thinkened around the area but doesn't seem septic. No fur around the injury presumably because of licking. Deer generally seemed healthy but I don't have the knowledge to assess he lymphatic system. Shall I eat it or not?

Also i do need to learn upon carcass inspection. What's the best way to go about this?
 

TOMMO.B

Well-Known Member
Bucks fight and get injured all the time. If not pussy and that then yes eat away.
as for the lymphatic system. Do your level 1 this will help.
all the best
 

J111

Well-Known Member
Bucks fight and get injured all the time. If not pussy and that then yes eat away.
as for the lymphatic system. Do your level 1 this will help.
all the best
done level 1. Don't seem to remember much. I tend to need hands on and repetion to learn stuff!
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
Also i do need to learn upon carcass inspection. What's the best way to go about this?
a. Sign up for a course on carcass gralloch & inspection. If you have a problem remembering stuff take lots of photos and notes.
b. Find a more experienced stalker willing to take you out or accompany you on a stalk to show you what you need to do/know. As above, take lots of photos and notes.
c. Look at You Tube videos.
d. Read the DI 'Best Practice' notes.
 

riflerob

Well-Known Member
I'd say that if you aren't capable or competent in checking a deer for signs of disease, and knowing what to look for, then you shouldn't be out shooting them without a companion who does know what to look for and how to inspect, and who is capable of showing you, and you can then learn.

Any idiot can pull a trigger and complete the paper exercise of a DSC1, it's out in the field with a competent person that you'll learn more.

BTW, I'm DSC1, so not putting it down as a qualification. But it has it's limitations, and it's supposed to be a base that you learn from, whether you do your DSC2 or not.
 

J111

Well-Known Member
I'd say that if you aren't capable or competent in checking a deer for signs of disease, and knowing what to look for, then you shouldn't be out shooting them without a companion who does know what to look for and how to inspect, and who is capable of showing you, and you can then learn.

Any idiot can pull a trigger and complete the paper exercise of a DSC1, it's out in the field with a competent person that you'll learn more.

BTW, I'm DSC1, so not putting it down as a qualification. But it has it's limitations, and it's supposed to be a base that you learn from, whether you do your DSC2 or not.
I knew someone wouldn't be able to resist. That's bollox. I'd like to know how many in here can locate all of the lymph nodes in a deer in line with dsc1. The way they brush over it on the course it is obviously not intended to be that essential that you know it inside out. Most deer that are shot are pretty healthy and you tell a lot about the state of a deer before it's shot and general inspection of the organs that it looks like the many other that have been shot.
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
It's certainly not bollox. You have a hunter number as proof that you once knew enough to inspect the lymphatic chain properly and can sign off a carcass as fit to enter the human food chain. Remember, you could be the first person to identify a case of foot and mouth, TB etc. However, have a look at Meat Hygiene best practice guides | The Deer Initiative and then click on Carcass Inspection. Everything you need to know is there. Practise finding the nodes every time you shoot an animal until it's second nature.
Hope that helps.
Dexter
 
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riflerob

Well-Known Member
I knew someone wouldn't be able to resist. That's bollox. I'd like to know how many in here can locate all of the lymph nodes in a deer in line with dsc1. The way they brush over it on the course it is obviously not intended to be that essential that you know it inside out. Most deer that are shot are pretty healthy and you tell a lot about the state of a deer before it's shot and general inspection of the organs that it looks like the many other that have been shot.
When you learnt to drive, and then passed your test, did you assume you knew everything there was to know ?

Because that's the attitude you seem to have taken to your DSC1.

You are either competent to pass a carcase into the food chain, or you are not. If not, then learn some more, get out with experienced people, and make sure you are competent.


YOU are responsible - in LAW - for checking and confirming that a deer is fit for consumption. Just the same as you are responsible for the security and lawful use of your firearms.
Grow up, and BE responsible for those things - ALL of them, not just the ones that are convenient.
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
How do people cope gutting rabbits, pigeons, pheasants etc? all these animals don't have a special course in checking their lymphatic system? The OP didn't say he was incapable of checking a deer for disease just he didn't have the knowledge to check the lymphatic system, which is only one of a number of checks.
 

JockStalk

Well-Known Member
Afraid I don't have a photo but shot a roe with a broken rib and a bit of the rib actually poking out through the skin. Rib thinkened around the area but doesn't seem septic. No fur around the injury presumably because of licking. Deer generally seemed healthy but I don't have the knowledge to assess he lymphatic system. Shall I eat it or not?

Also i do need to learn upon carcass inspection. What's the best way to go about this?
It'll possibly be OK to eat, but you can't be sure if your not confident with inspection. You've picked up on an injury, reasonable chance it could have caused infection, so a reasonable chance (without inspecting it) that its not A1. But I guess its given you pause for thought too and why you posted on here? Eat or no eat? - if personal consumption then your digestive system/ your call!!! (but I'd not put it into the larder for public consumption - simply because you are not sure yourself)

To gain the knowledge, I totally agree that you need time hands on to put the theory into practice and get to know what to look out for. Every days a school day, so you never stop learning - but to get confident, nothing beats hands on with someone who knows what they are doing. Can you get out with someone who is a bit more experienced in carcass inspection? Any courses on gralloch and inspection near you you can get yourself on?

Wiltshire is a bit far from me other wise I'd offer myself!

Good luck mate.
 
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SDM

Well-Known Member
Jesus guys the OP is asking for advice not a round of xxxxxxxx I did have a book it was off the BDS with laminated photos you could take out with notifiable diseases and lymphatic system I think it's been borrowed and not returned but I'm sure there still some out there handy in your truck just for quick reminders I will look for it if I find it i will post it to you all the best SDM
 

monarman

Well-Known Member
I have the very thing you're talking about SDM...... I bought it from the bds many years ago......
I did my dsc1 back in 2001 before they added the little bit about hygiene and giving folk a 'hunter number'......
I bought the booklet to give me a reminder of what fo look for.
Since then I did the proper game meat hygiene course and have shot rather a few deer as my job and for recreation so I tend to remember the lymphatic system etc.
Point being..... I'm happy to send you my booklet j111 ...... just pm me bud.

Id even send you a lock knife for gralloching..... but I don't have a spare and according to the hygiene police they aren't allowed!!!!!:eek:
 
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Ray7756

Well-Known Member
Well said Jockstalk :tiphat: And nice one Monarman :tiphat:
Now that's what SD is all about nice one guys

SDM
+1 for SDM the OP comes on here asking advice, admitting he does not know everything, and almost straight away he gets a load of flack from the fking EXPERTS, 99% of the guys on here are willing to help people Jockstalk and Monarmant and SDM being 3 of them, I have been stalking / shooting since i was a teenager, but only done my dsc1 a couple of years ago, and I still refer to my course book / notes if I am unsure, the important thing is the OP had the sense to realize he was out of his depth and the courage to admit it on an open forum so I say he has done everything correctly and give him a big thumbs up if he was closer to me I would definately take him out with me to help him out,,, come on you guys near him he is asking for help will someone please step up to the plate and give him a hand
Cheers
Ray
 
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Dexter

Well-Known Member
How do people cope gutting rabbits, pigeons, pheasants etc? all these animals don't have a special course in checking their lymphatic system?
That is one very naïve comment. Cloven hooved animals such as deer carry notifiable diseases that can shut down vast areas. To compare them with rabbits, pigeons or pheasants is ridiculous. If you care so little then perhaps you should have a re-think about deer stalking?
 

J111

Well-Known Member
Guys thanks very much for all the positive comments. Much appreciated. I was beginning to regret posting anything! Yes I am always looking to learn but as you will know it's not always that easy to get a mentor in this typically solo sport and it's ridiculous to suggest giving up stalking unless you know the lymphatic system of a deer inside out.
Cheers
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
That is one very naïve comment. Cloven hooved animals such as deer carry notifiable diseases that can shut down vast areas. To compare them with rabbits, pigeons or pheasants is ridiculous. If you care so little then perhaps you should have a re-think about deer stalking?
Ok what about everyone who home slaughters the animals they rear on their small holdings just like they have done for years. Just because someone doesn't know how to check the lymphatic system is hardly grounds for them to give up stalking. I'm more concerned about the last packet of chicken I ate that was two days out of date than if I checked every single lymph node in the last deer I shot. But hey, each to their own.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
As stalkers we are all learning all the time. I am not a professional, just an amateur stalker. I have shot just under 300 in the past 15 years since I started but every day is a learning day, more often than not something comes up while I'm out which make me think I must remember that. Whether it's something you learn about the deers habits, movements, something about your ground, a shooting position or something about the gralloch or butchering.

The trick to becoming better is when you discover something you don't understand well enough you need to read up on it or take advice from mentors or a community like this. I'm sure the OP came here looking for advice and has hopefully gone away with a message that he needs to learn a bit more about disease identification and the lymph system.

No need to have a crack at him, hopefully he will get the books out and be a better stalker for it.
 

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