Roe with Wild Garlic

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Buchan

Well-Known Member
Ever since I've started stalking, I've had in my head an idea to combine wild garlic and roe fillet, but I've never succeeded in shooting something when the garlic is in season. Happily I've now managed it.

Loin cooked as you prefer, mine was in the barbecue, lid on.
Make a bearnaise type sauce: simmer a shallot with white wine, salt and pepper leaving a sticky residue of about 1 tablespoon. Add to the yolks of 2 eggs. Cut the stalks off the wild garlic, chop fine and add to about 4 oz unsalted butter and allow to melt and infuse for about 5 minutes, then strain.
Place the eggs on a pan of simmering water and slowly add the butter, whcisking all the time (and I mean slow). ONce all the butter is in, add the chopped stems. It should be a runny sauce
Slice the leaves into thin ribbons, place the loin on the leaves, spoon over the bearnaise

You know the rest...
 

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75

Well-Known Member
That sounds cracking - got a young buck in the chiller that is going to get some of that treatment!
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Be slightly careful with wild garlic. There are two types - the native one which is good to eat, and the invasive one which can and does cause quite a bit of stomach upset.

@Mungo will now join in and tell us the differences between them
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Native garlic (Alium ursinum): broad, spear head shaped leaves, flower like a Pom Pom.

Invasive (Alium paradoxum): narrow, strap like leaves, flower in drooping clusters.
 

John_R

Well-Known Member
I've done similar to this albeit without the sauce. I've also melted butter and gently laid the garlic leaves in, they puff up a bit almost immediatley and that's when they're done.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Early season A ursinum leaves are absolutely delicious. I quite often just pick them and put them straight into a ham sandwich.
 
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