RSPB & Hen Harriers.

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Eyefor

Well-Known Member
What a load of b@!! 5?!t

I agree. That article is absolute tosh.

There are Hen Harriers near me who bred successfully in 2011, 2012 and 2013 and I have taken two local birdists so see them - one (well into his 70's) had never seen one in his life.

Also, their existence was reported (not by me) to the RSPB and (if I remember correctly) a guy came and saw them.

Are the RSPB on a fund raising programme?
 

gr1ffer

Well-Known Member
time for a mass complaint again lets use the system against them were the ones getting persecuted
 

Eyefor

Well-Known Member
The RSPB seem confused -

From their website

Quote

Due mainly to illegal killing, the hen harrier is Britain's most endangered bird of prey, with only 10 pairs breeding successfully in England in 2008.

Unquote

​Get it f******* right?
 

eggy s

Well-Known Member
Found this interesting.

Fortunately we have a good example of the consequences of RSPB management at their reserve at Carn Gafalit in Mid Wales following their acquisition of the SSSI product of generations of good grazing management.

1. 13 graziers were told to stop traditional patchwork burning of the heather, leading to loss of control of the ideal habitat.
2. Loss of ideal habitat has curtailed traditional grazing management of cattle and sheep, with the loss of 10 graziers through lack of incentive. The subsequent loss of dung and urine has reduced the insect population and soil quality.
3. The resulting under-grazing and lack of scrub control has led to one large accidental fire, probably started by walkers. Heather has taken 6 to 7 years to partially recover from attempts at control by flailing, being smothered by pulp. Where burnt, regeneration took place in 3 years.
4. Out of control bracken and 4 feet high heather, causes the remaining 3 graziers lose their sheep and even their cattle, complicating management and veterinary treatments.
5. Ticks and heather beetle now present serious uncontrolled problems.
6. There is little effective vermin control, a five fold increase in the local badger population, and so much general predation that prey species numbers have collapsed.
7. 30 to 40 grouse would have been seen regularly, now there appear to be none.
8. Hen Harriers were released into this area and have failed to survive the low food supplies, excessive predation and management neglect.
9. There has been no attempt to discuss management with the graziers despite requests.

Everybody loses and this pattern of neglect is typical of all RSPB reserves
 

Lightyear

Well-Known Member
This was on Farming Today this morning.

The response from the chap from the Game Keepers Association should also be reported on the Biased Broadcasting Company.

If my ailing memory serves....

As he pointed out, lack of available food will affect the Hen Harriers breeding success as will the theft of eggs from nests by fox and badger.

Of the 5,000,000 acres of upland in England only 1,000,000 acres are managed grouse land......Why are the hen harriers not successful in these other areas then ???

The usual RSPB anti-shooting diatribe.

Cheers + ATVB

Philip
 

Labrat

Well-Known Member
"Research by the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust (G
WCT) found that controlling predators like foxes and crows to protect red grouse on moorland helped birds of prey, including hen harriers."


Ahem, was that not research that was by both the GWCT and the RSPB!


edit - worth a read

http://www.rspb.org.uk/Images/grant_mallord_stephen_thompson_2012_tcm9-318973.pdf
 
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Knottaclu

Well-Known Member
Royal Society for the Protection of ******** - hmmm, since the automatic content censor takes that word out: Royal Society for the Protection of the Waste of Bulls

The title should be 'Hen harriers are on brink of extinction AGAIN after the RSPB fails to maintain population for the second time'. 1889: Formation of RSPB 1900: Hen harriers extinct on mainland Britain Post 1945: Hen harriers return to England 2010: RSPB tops 1M members 2013: Hen harriers virtually extinct in England.

And then (because it's all spin) even that isn't the real story... Hen harriers only become endangered by defining a small enough area - the IUCN Red List has them at Least Concern - and anything can be endangered if you define it tightly enough. For example, chickens have become extinct in my fridge after dinner last night and the loss of the last pair of eggs following breakfast.
 
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Kalahari

Well-Known Member
Well, I have complained to the BBC on the grounds of bias and a lack of journalistic integrity. Get in there guys, if enough of us do it it will work. We have to use the tactics of these organisations against them. Numbers make a huge difference.

David.
 

Eyefor

Well-Known Member
Well, I have complained to the BBC on the grounds of bias and a lack of journalistic integrity. Get in there guys, if enough of us do it it will work. We have to use the tactics of these organisations against them. Numbers make a huge difference.

David.

I have complained online also.

Interested to see what their reply is?
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
Found this interesting.

Fortunately we have a good example of the consequences of RSPB management at their reserve at Carn Gafalit in Mid Wales following their acquisition of the SSSI product of generations of good grazing management.

1. 13 graziers were told to stop traditional patchwork burning of the heather, leading to loss of control of the ideal habitat.
2. Loss of ideal habitat has curtailed traditional grazing management of cattle and sheep, with the loss of 10 graziers through lack of incentive. The subsequent loss of dung and urine has reduced the insect population and soil quality.
3. The resulting under-grazing and lack of scrub control has led to one large accidental fire, probably started by walkers. Heather has taken 6 to 7 years to partially recover from attempts at control by flailing, being smothered by pulp. Where burnt, regeneration took place in 3 years.
4. Out of control bracken and 4 feet high heather, causes the remaining 3 graziers lose their sheep and even their cattle, complicating management and veterinary treatments.
5. Ticks and heather beetle now present serious uncontrolled problems.
6. There is little effective vermin control, a five fold increase in the local badger population, and so much general predation that prey species numbers have collapsed.
7. 30 to 40 grouse would have been seen regularly, now there appear to be none.
8. Hen Harriers were released into this area and have failed to survive the low food supplies, excessive predation and management neglect.
9. There has been no attempt to discuss management with the graziers despite requests.

Everybody loses and this pattern of neglect is typical of all RSPB reserves

So does this not rather imply that the RSPB themselves are responsible for the disappearance of the Hen Harrier on their own reserves and does it not also imply that as Hen Harriers exist on keepered Grouse moors that these birds actually benefit from the protection of the shooting community. atb Tim
 

NeilG

Well-Known Member
+1 - Just complained aswell.

Makes me laugh, as my wife and I just came back from Trefrew in North Wales, where we saw 2 hen harriers ( at the same time - within 200 yards of each other ) hunting over an area of rushes. We were with a couple who said they see the two birds in that area regularly.

RSPB - and other charities should start getting their status reviewed when they do stuff like this.....
 

CWMMAN3738

Well-Known Member
Not to mention damage by ignorance or negligence to the SSSI.
So does this not rather imply that the RSPB themselves are responsible for the disappearance of the Hen Harrier on their own reserves and does it not also imply that as Hen Harriers exist on keepered Grouse moors that these birds actually benefit from the protection of the shooting community. atb Tim
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
[h=1]Hen harrier close to extinction in England, says RSPB[/h]Society blames rogue grouse moor gamekeepers for decline in bird-of-prey numbers. Moorland Association blames cold winter


Hen-Harrier-chicks-008.jpg
Two one month-old hen harrier chicks, pictured in 2010. Just two breeding pairs of the bird tried to nest in England this year and failed. Photograph: Owen Humphreys/PA

The "Glorious 12th" – 12 August, when the annual grouse-shooting season starts – will be marked on Monday with an acrimonious row between conservationists and the body that represents English and Welsh grouse moorland owners.
According to the RSPB, the last two breeding pairs of hen harriers in England failed this year to produce eggs for the first time in 60 years and are now on the point of extinction because gamekeepers working for rogue moorland estate owners have systematically persecuted the bird to protect baby grouse which live on the moors.
"No new hen harriers this season means that the hen harrier is on the brink of extinction in England," said RSPB spokesman Graham Madge. "Our belief is that on some estates there is a systematic approach to the removal of birds of prey. We are not asking that these people do anything more than respect the law. The loss is almost entirely due to the illegal persecution. It has to be by rogue grouse moor estates."
The hen harrier, a large bird of prey which eats small birds and mammals and is known for its breathtaking aerobatics, was once common in England, but since the 1990s numbers have fallen dramatically.
"Just two pairs attempted to nest this year in England, but both failed," the RSPB said in a statement. "At one of these sites the RSPB was working with the landowner to ensure the nest was protected. Sadly, the eggs never hatched.
"While conservationists believe that this nest failed naturally, the government's own wildlife advisers say that the population had been forced into this precarious position by illegal killing. The reason for the failure of the second nest isn't yet known."
Robert Benson, chairman of the Moorland Association, blamed the long cold winter for the birds' inability to breed this year. "Despite record numbers of hen harrier seen at winter roost sites around the country, very few mature birds have been seen during the breeding season," he said. "A very late and cold winter will have affected breeding patterns.
"There have been two hen harrier nesting attempts on or adjacent to grouse moors this spring but, disappointingly, neither have resulted in chicks hatching.
"One pair built a nest in County Durham and laid eggs but the male deserted, forcing the female to abandon the nest to feed.
"In the second attempt, an immature female, which nested 5 metres [16ft] from the boundary of the moor, laid two eggs in Northumberland but the eggs were not viable despite the female incubating for the full term and the male provisioning her well. The local grouse moor keeper was briefed, licensed and ready to diversionary-feed [pdf]the adults to protect a very low grouse population on the neighbouring estate."
The RSPB argues that English moorlands could support more than 300 pairs of hen harrier.
"A government study cited illegal persecution through shooting, trapping and disturbance as the main reason for the hen harrier's unfavourable conservation status in England," said Madge.
In 2007 there were 15 breeding pairs in England. That year two hen harriers were shot over the Queen's estate at Sandringham, Norfolk, while Prince Harry, his friend William van Cutsem and a gamekeeper were out duck shooting. All three were questioned by police but released without charge after they denied any knowledge of the incident.
 
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