RSPCA shoot deer!

woodmaster

Well-Known Member
Just looking at my local news online and came across this article. I have no issue with the deer being shot on grounds that it is injured, but have similar concerns to that raised in the report. I presume the "officer" was using a captive bolt, as using any other type of firearm on that surface could be interesting. However leaving the carcass in open view of the public path it pretty poor practice.
My point is why do we get so much flack from such institutes when they accept that there can be a need to shoot something?
 

spannulman

Well-Known Member
Just found it on bbc. Apparently he used a ‘stunning pistol’. I’m not sure I agree. A Borchardt C-93, that’s a stunningpistol.......121601
 
Just looking at my local news online and came across this article. I have no issue with the deer being shot on grounds that it is injured, but have similar concerns to that raised in the report. I presume the "officer" was using a captive bolt, as using any other type of firearm on that surface could be interesting. However leaving the carcass in open view of the public path it pretty poor practice.
My point is why do we get so much flack from such institutes when they accept that there can be a need to shoot something?
A couple of years ago, I was informed by a section 5 dealer that he had just supplied a quantity of .38 pistols to the RSPCA (think it was about 50)mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Forgot to mention, that as of March 29th, RSPCA will most likely be shooting a lot of muntjac as the licensed exemption for rehabilitating injured / orphaned munties has been removed. Any invasive species brought in (grey squirrels, munties, etc.) now has to be destroyed.
 
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Archer

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the youtube link.
Plus side.
Seems to have dispatched the animal with minimal fuss and then used a "pithing rod" to confirm his actions
Minus side
In full view of people ( and being recorded)
Not removing the carcass
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
Maybe the RSPCA should invest in some of the Decathlon 100ltr game/body bags. Would at least have removed the carcass from view ASAP.
 

kieran222

Well-Known Member
I would imagine it was a muntjac although it was described as a "baby deer". A reminder to us all about how you can suddenly be dropped in the crap by mobile footage.
On one occasion when I went out stalking I parked up in a nearby woodland car park and as I was getting my gear out of the truck a man walked out of the woods with a spanner. Looked very odd at the time. Anyway he approached me possibly suspecting from the gear that I had on that I was going shooting, he started to tell me that himself and another man had spent about 1hr trying to free a deer from the fence wire by the footpath on one of the main routes. He said it was in a bad way. As it was on the edge of my ground I went and had a look. It was blind in one eye from trashing about on the ground while suspended from the wire and couldn't walk, looked like it had one broken leg. It got up and ran about 5 yards before collapsing so it didn't take much to convince me that it needed to be put out of its misery. My main concern when dealing with it was that a walker would come along and challenge me, possibly even video me. I wouldn't normally have shot something in pretty much open view of a public area. Anyway managed to get it all sorted but was planning my speech as I was dealing with it just in case. My speech was something along the lines of, would they have preferred to come across the deer dying most likely being stressed by their dog or later have to walk past a rotting carcass daily while it decomposed.

I would have thought that the RSPCA man would have had better sense to deal with it off camera and dispose of it properly.
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
I would have thought that the RSPCA man would have had better sense to deal with it off camera and dispose of it properly.
He definitely could have disposed of it in a better way but the filming he has no control over. He was on their property with their permission so has to let them film if they want. Same way the police have to put up with interfering idiots filming them while struggling with violent suspects. Long gone are the days when people step in and help any professional who is struggling. Much better to film it and then post it online with a criticism of how they would have done it better when really they had no clue or confidence to actually do anything.
 

delta wolf

Well-Known Member
Why is it a big deal? They carry .38 pistol and captive bolt and are trained to use both?
They get called to loads of dispatch jobs.
Whilst the management are poor, the average inspector on the street are just doing their job.
 

biffo

Well-Known Member
I’m sure many of the RSPCA employees are solid individuals. What really gets me though is that the RSPCA present themselves as having some sort of governmental mandate, or a divine right to decide what constitutes criminal activity or not. Don’t get me wrong, I’m sure they do a lot of good, but...and a big but...they are a PRIVATE enterprise, operating under a charitable remit, but driven by a need to generate income...£140million last year, and they spend over £50million on salaries.
How would you feel if any old bloke turned up on your doorstep trying to gain entry saying he had heard your hamster was being badly treated. !
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
A couple of years ago, I was informed by a section 5 dealer that he had just supplied a quantity of .38 pistols to the RSPCA (think it was about 50)mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Forgot to mention, that as of March 29th, RSPCA will most likely be shooting a lot of muntjac as the licensed exemption for rehabilitating injured / orphaned munties has been removed. Any invasive species brought in (grey squirrels, munties, etc.) now has to be destroyed.
I wonder if the price will now come down to shoot them ? and inc the CWD as they are over priced pests :norty::popcorn:
 

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