Rusty Relics

Ade8mm

Well-Known Member
I have been helping a friend move house recently. I popped to see how she was getting on earlier today and took the opportunity to grab a photo of some of the rusty relics her husband collected before he died and thought some of the SD members might like to see. There a a few more still at her old place. (PS this is not in the UK)

PS The Sporterised (canibalised) SMLE is a No.1 MK 3, dated 1914 (matching serial numbers!)

There is one Jezail, the others are all short lever MH .577/.450 and one Martini Enfield .303 (on the right)

I have been given the job of cleaning them , to which my response was "Why?"


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Wapinschaw

Well-Known Member
Interesting historic collection. I note the flag that shows with your details, all the firearms in your photo were common in Oman when I was serving in the RAF at Salalah many years ago.
 

Ade8mm

Well-Known Member
Interesting historic collection. I note the flag that shows with your details, all the firearms in your photo were common in Oman when I was serving in the RAF at Salalah many years ago.
Busted !! Yes Oman.

Interestingly even now if out in the Jebel or remoter areas Goat-herds can sometimes be seen with an MH slung over their shoulder.

A few years back whilst on a remote trip I was in Shuwaymiyah (which as you will recall is North East of Salalah) I saw a young lad (early teens) tending his goats with a Lee Enfield in his hand.

Given shooting anything in Oman is a real no-no I did wonder why he had it.

I stopped and asked him about his rifle and why he had it and he replied "liqatl alkilab" - "For killing dogs"

:cool:
 

Wapinschaw

Well-Known Member
I was at Salalah in 1976 - 1977 just after the infiltration from Yemen ended, and it was quite common to see civilians in Salalah town carrying rifles. Most public buildings and certainly the bases had guards usually armed with No4 Lee Enfields. This splendid chap was in the town, I'm not sure now what he was protecting. He is very clean and tidy, and his khunjar (spelling?) dagger is magnificent, suggesting senior rank or status.

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Ade8mm

Well-Known Member
Khanjar

Great picture

Back in the day these daggers would be the ones made from Rhino Horn.. There are still a few one could buy like that. Cost a lot and you would not be permitted to take them out of the country as they are viewed as antiquities (and rightly so) Oman wants to keep its heritage

Modern ones (not talking about the tourist tat) will have bone or cow horn handles

They look impressive. They are. As you said in your post show status. And indeed that is the point. Not much practical use outside stabbing. It is a dagger after all

Often worn in Oman by dignitaries though amusingly invites to diplomatic and formal functions (yes I do get a few) usually state;

"Dress code - Non-Omanis, Business suit. Omanis, Traditional dress - No Khanjar"

Imagine an invite to a black tie do in the UK , "Dress code - Ladies , Evening Dress , Men Black Tie - No Stalking Knife" :cool:
 
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