Sako or Tikka? Wood or Synthetic?

wadashot

Well-Known Member
Nothing wrong with a T3. I have pals with them and have no problems at all :confused:
I personally have a 595 but would have aT3 with no hesitation.

wadas
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
I can never understand why people buy rubbish guns! I'll phone Tikka in the morning and ask them to stop production of their highly popular range of rifles. Think of all the money I've saved them! :eek:
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
I don't see why you can't go to a range and have the various gunmakers display their goods and let you have a few shots with them down the range. Maybe even get the chance to win a goldfish. Its not really too much to ask when you are spending that amount of 'Wonga'.
 

Tim1

Well-Known Member
Gyr,

I'd have to agree with Thar and 5Ways.

I would suggest that you should definitely go synthetic as it takes all of the heartache out of the job if you dink the woodwork and defintely go Sako unless you can find some good examples of 595 or 695 Tikkas. I've had two T3 Lites in the past and came to the conclusion that although accurate they are junk and grossly overated and overpriced compared with their predecessors of which I've also had two. I now shoot Sako Synthetics.

If you want a cheaper rifle than the Sako I'd go Howa and save money over a T3 - Sako like quality at half the cost. I have one in .270 Win that won't shoot over about .6" and it has the advantage of feeling like a rifle rather than something that came out of a lucky bag. I don't know how they do it for the money.

Wood is fine for the job if you buy a pre-dinked second hand job with a bit of patination. Then a few more dinks don't seem to matter.

I hope that helps.

Kind regards,

Tim
 

jon2

Well-Known Member
The T3 is a good design. The problem with it is that it is cheap and nasty.

I had a T3 lite which was incredibly accurate but they are cheap looking and feeling. I have learnt over the years that you should not compromise in your choice as you only end up spending more in the long term.

The Sako is a good solid quality build with no plastic bits anywhere to save money etc in production.

Do not hesitate and save the extra cash and buy a Sako. Once you have made the investment, you have it and everytime you get it out of the cabinet you will be pleased knowing that you have the best and have not made a compromise.

I have to say the Howa oozes quality and for under £500 for stainless syn I honestly do not know how they do it for the money. If and only if you are in a position where you are unable to save for the Sako I would go Howa. The only thing you may want to consider is the Howa has an integral mag and this can be a pain if you are in and out of truck etc alot unloading and loading.

A final alternative if money is an issue is to buy a second hand Sako but tread with caution here as some dealers charge an extortionate amount for 2nd hand Sako's and the prices are just not fair. If you go down this route try Steve Beaty you will find him on Guntrader. He sells mint condition 75's from anything from £520 to £580 depending on screw cutting etc and Steve is one of the best in the industry. He will also let you shoot it on his range before you lay out the cash.

If you need any further help let us know.

Happy hunting.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I will go against all the advice:

1) Stainless has the one big disadvantage in that it shines and reflects - and many stalkers I know don't like that about them. Best finish is a matt black on the barrells.

2) Plastic is well plastic in feel and nothing feels better than wood. If it is oil finished it is actually very easy to maintain and any dents etc either just add to the charachter or are easily repaired from time to time with the use of a bit of steam and bit of oil.

3) Plastic stocked can look very black and military like and am somewhat conscious that I don't want to look like the the member of a SWAT team or worse to amember of the public.

I use a blued and wooden stocked Heym SR20 - admittadely it is glass bedded. It goes out in all weathers and haven't needed to adjust the sights since I bought it 10 years ago.

With any rifle the weakest part is the scope and scope mount and if it is ****ing with rain and snow I do try if possible to keep the rifle in a cover - more to keep the optics dry than for any worry about the finish. I do baby the rifle when carrying it - it is a precision tool after all - and not a club, walking stick or whatever. Yes it has a few dents on the stock - but there is a story behind each one.

Probably the toughest environment for any firearm is the foreshore - wet, sand and salt. My wildfowling gun for 20 years has been an AYA Yeoman side by side - before I go out I wipe the barrels over with Rangoon oil or WD40 - when I get back rinse the mud and salt off in the shower - dry it off with a towel and then leave for a few hours in the airing cupboard. A good wipe over with oily cloth and once a year a few drops of stock oil. It is still in very good condition and has a nice patina of age. I have a benelli Nova pump action that I bought for use with steel shot (black and very plastic) - since I can't hit anything with it, have gone back to the AYA and use steel shot through it - yes the chokes are only 1/4 and 1/2.

Ultimately it is a matter of personal taste, but I think it is no great hardship to clean a gun or rifle - indeed it is one thing I postively enjoy doing.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Some of the injection moulded plastic stocks are really terrible,
Ive got one on my howa, main problem is that they are so soft in the
forend. Can't see the sense in having a 500 quid rifle stuck in a stock that has a material value of 2 quid.
I'll make a fibreglas stock for the howa and throw the plastic one away.

I am convinced that the best stock material available would be a combination of wood and carbon. Wood is a great vibration dampener and
many benchrest guy's are going back again. For us falling around in a wet
rough terrain a fibreglas stock or lightweight glas/carbon stock would be the best compromise.

Tikka or sako? sako!

edi
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Heym,
did a carbon job on my CZ223, important is that it is done wet in wet
with the bedding. The nice wood look is kept.
cz223carbonbedding.jpg

edi
 

wadashot

Well-Known Member
After a lot of thought and going on some of the negative vibes about T3s i have just come off the phone from my pals and told them to bin theres :eek: Tikka have also agreed to stop production and will no longer be selling them as they have read the threads on here and are quite happy that if certain people say they are sh** then that`s good enough for them. :eek:

wadas
 

jon2

Well-Known Member
Gyr

I forgot to say for what it is worth I would also go for stainless synthetic if you want to use the rifle as a functional piece without worrying about the wood work.

Wood stocked rifles are very nice to behold and as I think Heym mentioned a good patternation with wear is very appealing but from a practical view point (ie wiping mud off etc) my vote goes with the man made variety.

It depends really on how you envisage using the rifle and what you want to do with it I suppose.

Taking an impartial view wood was the only thing available pre synthetics etc and in fact I am trying to remember roughly the year stn/syn was an option - I think maybe around 1995-96 or something around that time so they are only a very recent option in the grand scheme of things and wood staocked rifles served all well then without issue. But as an individual my tastes have changed over the years and I have ended up with the syn/stn option.

Either way let us know what you deciede to do.
 

Gyr

Well-Known Member
Hi All,
Thanks for your views.

Trouble is my head says synthetic and my heart says wood!
The plastic just feels horrible to handle and it's as if the rifle has no soul.
Sako's SHOULD be better quality...they are twice the price of a t3.

Regards,

Gyr
 

stone

Well-Known Member
Gyr said:
Hi All,
Thanks for your views.

Trouble is my head says synthetic and my heart says wood!
The plastic just feels horrible to handle and it's as if the rifle has no soul.
Sako's SHOULD be better quality...they are twice the price of a t3.

Regards,

Gyr
go with you heart not your pocket as if money drives your desire then you will never be happy ,
take care
stone
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Waddas :D Thats terrible news about Tikka. I have been on the phone to my stockbroker and told him to sell all my shares in Tikka :cry:

I shall keep mine for another 20 years like the first one I had, as it should be a collectors item in about another 20 years time :rolleyes:
 

wadashot

Well-Known Member
Think i will risk keeping mine aswell malcom, ;) hope it dosen`t break down or something :confused:
Mind you, the thing dosen`t owe me a penny after about 8-9 years ;)

wadas
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Stone mate where are you getting all this 'Wisdom'! You sound like a Buddist monk! :eek: 'Go with your heart.....woooow! Go with the sick bucket more like! :lol:
 

Jason

Well-Known Member
Go Stainless synthetic, tikka and Sako, both super accurate out of the box the Sako got some differences, but as to wether it make for a better rifle I'd say it down to how much cash you want to spend. Although the sako 85 finnlight is a nice piece of kit and very very light.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Hear hear Wadders. I had one for 20 years, just sold it for very little to my young Finnish friend who is writing an article on the rifle and what i have shot with it. Now have a Tikka T3 Lite in Cammo.

Slapped a 3x9x40 VarixII Leupold on it, took 5 shots to sight it in. TooK it out for the first time after Mr B left me in Scotland, nailed a Sika Hind with it on the spot, within an hour of being out at 100yds.

Like I have said before, if the rifle fits you and suits you, buy it, and then get out there and use it. Too much talk about this that and the other, go stalking NOT TALKING. ;)
 
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