Sako Trigger

jingzy

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know what riflesmiths do to sako triggers when the term "reworked trigger" is used.

J
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Suggest that they carefully polish up the face of the Trigger / sear so that the two surfaces are parrallel, corners are sharp and the trigger breaks cleanly when a certain pressure - say 3lbs is applied. If the two surfaces are rough then the trigger pull will be roguh, draggy and inconsistent.

The trigger will also be adjusted for over travel and weight.

Be very cautious of any trigger that has been "adjusted".

But the following are simple tests that should be done reasonably regularly.

With an UNLOADED rifle

1) vigourously close the bolt (you have a charging buffalo running at you type speed and vigour) - check that the firing pin has not fallen. If it does then likely the rifle will fire when you chamber a round.

2) close the bolt - safety off.
Thump the rifle with your hand, jar it indeed thump the rifle butt on the ground

3) Safety ON - repeat the above.

4) Safety ON - repeat the above and then release the safety.

If the firing pin falls in any of the above tests - Do NOT use until it has been looked at by somebody who knows what they are doing.
 

Max

Well-Known Member
jingzy

I have an old Sako A2 action that I had re-barreled to 250 Ackley and changed the trigger to a Timney.

I still have the old Sako trigger which was fairly crisp if I remember right, dont quite know why I changed now :rolleyes:

If the A2 trigger will fit your rifle you can have it for nothing and see if its better than your's. Just a thought :idea:

Max
 

jingzy

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys,

I will probably look at polishing the contact areas to start with. I have found another couple of articles on-line and will advance with care.

Max,

I will send you a PM.

Cheers,

J
 

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