scope zero

Conh

Well-Known Member
how often does your scope lose zero ? I have a burris on a .243 and it needs checking every week , I was just wondering whether this is normal ?
 
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Munty1

Well-Known Member
I have good German scopes on all my rifles, check them at the beginning of the season and unless something happens like I drop it or I miss one I never check it. The only time I found it had moved was when I had a so called gunsmith put a scope on a new rifle and never put locktite on the threads.

If you need to set it up each week something is wrong. Mounts or its the scope.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I had a Tikka 595 with a Meopta sight fitted in Optilock rings that I don't think I touched in over 12 years, always spot on. Sounds like something is wrong minikeeper.
 

Conh

Well-Known Member
I have optilock rings and a burris scope , everything is done up tight and the scope and rings are only a year old , its annoying because the scope was £500 and I cant really afford a new one
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
Return scope under warranty if all is tight it's the scope

Take the scope back to the dealer it was purchased from.
Under the `Sale of Goods Act` an item must be `fit for purpose` and it will be his responsibility to return it for repair or replacement.
HWH.
 

Wingy

Well-Known Member
Take the scope back to the dealer it was purchased from.
Under the `Sale of Goods Act` an item must be `fit for purpose` and it will be his responsibility to return it for repair or replacement.
HWH.

+1 sounds like you have a faulty scope.
How far off zero is it? It's not that you have zeroed at low magnification then shooting on large magnification? You can get a slight shift in zero.
Also if you zero off a bipod then shoot off sticks that could also give a slight shift in zero.
Has your rifle been shot ok with a different scope (damaged crown) could cause this inconsistent zero
Check your ammo is the same, may sound silly but I was experimenting with a 308 and I have 165,150,123 grain ammo, easy to mix up.
 

jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
No offense but from what I've heard about Burris scopes they're not all that good I know a chap who had a lens come loose in his , I'd send it back get a refund and buys second hand Schmidt or zeiss
atb Jim
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Before one goes jumping up and down get another scope and fit and zero that and see if this cures the issue. This at least narrows it down to the scope being the problem. If you were nearer you could borrow one of mine for this test however it's a bit of trek from Shropshire to Lincolnshire.
 

sir-lamp-alot

Well-Known Member
not being nasty but maybe your tinkering just a little to much you may well have a problem with the scope and in that case fair enough but if your using the rifle and still killing with it then just leave it
 

Brigadoon

Active Member
how often does your scope lose zero ? I have a burris on a .243 and it needs checking every week , I was just wondering whether this is normal ?

swap your scope to another rifle and see if the problem moves with the scope or stays with the rifle, if it is the scope then send it back, if it is not the scope then check the rifle - I had something similar with a tikka and when we took the rifle out of its bed found that there was a centre ridge in the stock groove which was supposed to allow the barrel to float
 

Erik Hamburger

Well-Known Member
how often does your scope lose zero ? I have a burris on a .243 and it needs checking every week , I was just wondering whether this is normal ?

I use a Sightron S11 6x42 on a .243W, occassionally I check it on the range, and the Zero is always pretty solid.
Anyway I feel that people are far too obsessed with their zero and the groups they shoot: Most lowland/woodland deer is shot at 40-60 yards, and the 'killing zone' extends to a good 6" if you stick to the (best Practise) of broadside heart/lung shots.
My view is that you should focus on getting close to deer (or get closer to deer) and your 'clover-leaf group' becomes quite irrelevant.
 

Wingy

Well-Known Member
not being nasty but maybe your tinkering just a little to much you may well have a problem with the scope and in that case fair enough but if your using the rifle and still killing with it then just leave it

How can you advise to just leave it? The OP has not said why they feel the need to keep checking zero, if it's because the rifle / scope setup is not holding a constant zero then the problem needs to be found and fixed before any more shooting at live quarry. The OP may still be killing with this set up, next time missing or wounding and no animal that we as responsible stalkers shoot at deserves to suffer because of our failure to sort out a problem with our kit that we are aware of.
Wingy
 

varmint223

Well-Known Member
Have you screwed the mounts tight enough ? I know I am guilty of this because I panic that I will damage the scope ....hope you get it sort out quickly anyway mate.
 

Dallascorban

Well-Known Member
Take the scope back to the dealer it was purchased from.
Under the `Sale of Goods Act` an item must be `fit for purpose` and it will be his responsibility to return it for repair or replacement.
HWH.

I had the same problem with a Hawke scope on my air rifle, it would only hold zero for a couple of days.
If you've check your basic's then the scope is not fit for purpose, take it back. I said i wanted my money back or a new scope, i got a new Hawke in the same model, that was four years ago and not a problem since.
 
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