Seized Moderator

novice

Well-Known Member
I've managed to allow my ase northstar to get seized onto the rifle.

Any advice on how to free it?

Cheers

Novice
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Most methods rely on using heat to expand a seized joint. But usually these used a gas torch to heat the item. On your gun that may be not a good idea! First call might be to the Northstar folk?

A method that will heat but not destroy is that you could try pouring a good kettle full of boiling water down the barrel. This will heat the barrel and being boiling water will air dry immediately in any crevices and crannies it washes in to.

Or you could borrow one of those electric tools garages have to free seized shafts that is like a wrap around electric heating element and wrap it around the moderator? The time the heating time and gradually increase this by a few seconds each time?

My worry would be if the thing is brazed or silver soldered that you may heat it so the joints on the moderator fail. But by timing this coil thing and increasing the time it'll be more controllable?

 
Last edited:

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I forgot to add that obviously you don't want to hold the electric heater thing around the item you are heating long enough to have the item reach red heat. Or anywhere near that stage. Or that if the item is brazed or silver soldered to cause the moderator to fall apart.
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
Do not pour water on it,that's what caused the seizure in the first place,directly or indirectly. Another source of heating might help if you must,they a quite resilient.
Try spraying it with penetrating fluid and leave it to soak for a day,then try the strap suggested by Fish Boy. They will sometimes be just locked up on the shoulder and a quick rap might free it.
If it doesn't free make sure you clean any excess lube well before shooting it again. When next you shoot it, check if the heat generated and penetrating fluid has helped to free it.
Or take it to your gunsmith who has the proper vice and tools to protect your rifle from additional damage as the muzzle thread and crown could be goosed.Expect a lecture about lack of maintenance lol.john.
 

Rusty Gate

Well-Known Member
TRUST ME! Siezed engines used to be freed up this way.

1L pop bottle or whatever is narrow & tall so least fuel is needed. Stand in a corner, rifle moderator in bottle. Fill bottle with paraffin or diesel if not available. Sit over night, then just unscrew you freed up moderator.
You can turn the mod upside down soak another hour on its own & can be stripped cleaned very nicely to. If it’s one piece drain as best you can then blow compressed air through, hot soapy water, rinse thoroughly then blow again.

I always fit mine with a touch of aluminium grease, copper grease better than nothing mind. Just a light trace on first thread then wind mod on/off once to see if spread ok.

I use Wurth Alu grease. Can buy a small sachet on eBay size of a sauce sachet. Eight years & mine is still quite full & in my range box
 

Uncle Norm

Well-Known Member
A rifle-smith that I knew well years ago used to put them in the freezer for a few hours. Similar principle to applying heat I suppose ? Worked sometimes but not always. May be a problem with moisture accumulating though ?
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
A potential problem with that approach is you could put undue strain on the action to stock bolts while trying to stop the rifle spinning. I guess you could place the barrel in a vice if you can adequately protect the finish though?
This is a very good point. An acquaintance of mine broke a stock while trying to remove a seized mod.
I'd suggest that, however you choose to arrange it, the stock should not be subjected to any of the turning moment needed to get the thing off!
 

penta

Well-Known Member
A potential problem with that approach is you could put undue strain on the action to stock bolts while trying to stop the rifle spinning. I guess you could place the barrel in a vice if you can adequately protect the finish though?
I would definitely remove the stock. If you where using a chain removal tool, you could cut down a beer can to suit the diameter of the mod in order to protect it from marks.
I have done this on a friends rifle and it worked a treat.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
Stand the rifle muzzle down with just the moderator in boiling water. Firing a few shot through it might warm the moderator enough, but will also warm the barrel.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Proper old type nail varnish remover, ie acetone. A far better penetrating fluid than WD40 or Plusgas etc.
That reminds me of a method my American friend told me of. Mix 50/50 acetone and brake fluid. 'Panther P_iss' he calls it, and he claims there's not a seized bolt or screw it won't release! I've tried it a time or two myself, and the results have astounded me
 
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enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
A potential problem with that approach is you could put undue strain on the action to stock bolts while trying to stop the rifle spinning.
Yes! It's why when cleaning an Enfield, if you needed to clamp it, that you used to clamp it around the butt and not around the forestock.
 

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