Shooting Buck Kids in the Doe Season

devilishdave

Well-Known Member
#1
I was under the impresson that the law in England changed last year and you could now legaly cull a buck kid if you had just culled or were about to cull its mother is this the case or not.

Before some one points it out; at this time of year there is no welfare issue regarding orphaning kids, unless they are very week they have made it through the winter and should be ok if mum is culled.
 

Rangefinder

Well-Known Member
#5
I think you'll find its if the buck kid is dependant or injured/diseased, see below:


Section 6(2) of the 1991 Act creates an exemption for any act done for the purpose of
preventing the suffering of an injured or diseased deer.

c) Allow dependent deer to be taken or killed if they have been deprived of, or are about
to be deprived of, their mother, at any time of year.
 

devilishdave

Well-Known Member
#7
Rangefinder said:
I think you'll find its if the buck kid is dependant or injured/diseased, see below:


Section 6(2) of the 1991 Act creates an exemption for any act done for the purpose of
preventing the suffering of an injured or diseased deer.

c) Allow dependent deer to be taken or killed if they have been deprived of, or are about
to be deprived of, their mother, at any time of year.
The reason I pose the question is that in Shooting Times 26 Feb page 45 Richard Prior states that:

In Scotland an exemptionallows any calf Fawn or Kid to be shot if it has been or is about to be deprived of it's mother.

He then goes on to state:

In England However the Kid must be left until the apropriate season.

Dave
 

devilishdave

Well-Known Member
#8
To answer my own question:

In this weeks shooting times they have published a retraction; ST Incorrectly stated that healthy male kids may not be shot out of season in England and Wales. The 2007 Regulatory Reform (Deer) (England and Wales Order) now allows lawful killing of dependant kids that the deerstalker reasonably believes have been or are about to be deprived of their mother by legal means at any time of the year.

Dave
 

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