Shooting etiquette

Tikkat3xl

Member
Is it seen to be bad practice if you shoot crows on a field the day before someone wants to shoot pigeons or does it not matter?
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Very easy to 'blow up' a good pigeon field; once set up a couple hides for two able Guns, having ascertained that another groups of four had shot that same field from 1500 the day before ( - after the heavy rain had stopped, they'd shot 52 or so, I later found out between four Guns from 1500-1800); we set up around 11am, and worked away until precisely 1500, whereafter the pigeons simply dried up, an otherwise unusual occurrence, normally they continue until after 1800;

The two shot 740 between them in between the time they began until 1500.

Etiquette aside, it does have an impact.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
Huh? Etiquette pigeon shooting? The only things that apply really are safety (always first), politeness (if there's more than one in a hide, set rules such as who fires where or in turns or whatever and stick to it) then tidy up after yourselves.

Shooting in a field the day before is bound to have an effect on the next day's bag generally, whatever you shoot will cause some disturbance but that's not really etiquette, it's just something to avoid.
 

Richie_6.5x55

Well-Known Member
i share a big bit of ground with an older gentleman, into his 80s now, who loves pigeon shooting, i look after the deer foxes and rabbits and he shoots the pigeons and crows, which were both happy with.

I've been out stalking in the morning and glassed and seen the fields covered in birds, which would be great sport, I've rung him and told him and hes had bags over 150 on quite a few occasion's.

i would say if your going to share ground, you need to de-conflicted with each other or team up, and both reap the rewards.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Remember, the purpose of the exercise is to protect the crop. So, whether you shoot the birds or frighten them away, amounts to the same thing. If, as a result of shooting the field one day the birds don't come back the next then the objective has been achieved. Sport should be very much a secondary consideration where avian pest control is concerned. Read the general license.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Simple answer to any question of etiquette is “treat others as you would treat yourself”

so in answer to the OPs question, if you were planning a days pigeon shooting tomorrow how would you feel if somebody was shooting in that field today, especially if they knew that you were shooting tomorrow.

A moments thought and a bit of communication never hurt anybody.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Same as it's bad practice to shoot pigeons and crows on a driven pheasant day until at the very least the whole line has seen a few pheasants over it. One it has done then crack on.
 

Pete6.5

Well-Known Member
Simple answer to any question of etiquette is “treat others as you would treat yourself”

so in answer to the OPs question, if you were planning a days pigeon shooting tomorrow how would you feel if somebody was shooting in that field today, especially if they knew that you were shooting tomorrow.

A moments thought and a bit of communication never hurt anybody.
I agree how would you like it if it was the other way round
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
I'd also add
If ur sharing a permission try to be aware of the others work patterns, esp if only a few of u.
If u are retired or work a decent shift pattern with loads of time off be aware off lads that only get wknds or Sundays off.
So try to avoid shooting the day before if u know there planning a rare day out as struggling with work/family.

But really the above 2 posts cover it, a bit of commonsense and treating other well.
 

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