Shooting Sticks

Sidewinder

Well-Known Member
Hi All:

I have been told by the pros to get a pair....Problem is that I am from the States and we just never use them, I find them cumbersome and heavy, and find I can often get a pretty accurate shot in a sitting position. So whats the point?

It may seem like a no-brainer to you, but do I really need them?

And Which should I start out with - Mono, Bi- , tri - or Quad-pod?

Please help, and if anyone has a spare pair they want to post to me for a small fee to get me started, I would appreciate it.

Thanks

-Z
 

patrickt

Well-Known Member
Good morning Sidewinder, I think an Old American saying is in order here "IF IT AINT BUST DON'T FIX IT". I believe that if you can do it without the need of something why bother, but when people tell you, you do need something sooner or later you start to believe that you do need it, when in fact you only "want it"

Finally, why do you not make your own, much cheaper, and more satisfaction. Monkey Spanner on this site has very usefully put up a thread which includes pictures (for those of who can read photographs!!) for making quad sticks, he calls them (naturally) "Monkey Sticks", and they definitely work

Good Luck

Patrick
 

Miki

Well-Known Member
Why did they tell you to get a pair (and were they talking about sticks) ?

I use quad sticks and they do improve accuracy (not that I am the best to start with), they also allow me to hold off and maintain a steady shot as the sticks themselves are taking the weight. The sticks are not heavy at all but do take some getting used to, I haven't quite got the opening and mounting the rifle into one smooth movement yet, nor taking the rifle back to my shoulder after the shot. They are not for crawling through the brush with, but for walking around a wood and through avenues as well as shooting rabbits at 100M + with a standing shot, they are ideal.
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
If you are on open ground the you may not need sticks.
you can lie or sit and get a clear accurate shot.
We are often hunting in situations where because of the intervening undergrowth & vegetation
you need to take a standing shot at a fair range.
This is where the sticks are helpful to maintain a steady aim
as apposed to a wobbly off hand shot.
I agree sometimes they are a nuisance and I have lost opportunities
whilst setting the sticks up.
On the other hand I know I can shoot a really good group
off sticks.
One strong stick is useful on the hills,(also helps your balance walking)
in the woods probably a quadstick
Some of us make our own, basically from four 6 foot bamboo canes
simply linked with insulating tape.
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
Hi All:

I have been told by the pros to get a pair....Problem is that I am from the States and we just never use them, I find them cumbersome and heavy, and find I can often get a pretty accurate shot in a sitting position. So whats the point?

It may seem like a no-brainer to you, but do I really need them?

And Which should I start out with - Mono, Bi- , tri - or Quad-pod?

Please help, and if anyone has a spare pair they want to post to me for a small fee to get me started, I would appreciate it.

Thanks

-Z
Could be Sidewinder is headed to Africa "(I have been told by the pros to get a pair)" in which case bi or tri to practice from. Of course I could be wrong..
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
Hi All:

I have been told by the pros to get a pair....Problem is that I am from the States and we just never use them, I find them cumbersome and heavy, and find I can often get a pretty accurate shot in a sitting position. So whats the point?

It may seem like a no-brainer to you, but do I really need them? ......
Z. When the cover comes up to chest height, 4 sticks are very handy. If you spot a roe, you can just stop, put the rifle on the 4 sticks and wait. I watched a man watch some roe for nearly an hour one morning waiting for a chance. Keep in mind the 4 sticks can be used as twin sticks or even as a single stick at close ranges.

Regards

JCS
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
I find them very useful on mixed ground - say farmland with hedges and fields, or gorse thickets and pasture, or forestry and more open ground. Essentially where you have a reasonable expectation of being able to move into position undetected, but need to take a longer range shot where you're not comfortable shooting offhand, but seated or off a bipod isn't an option because of obstacles or long vegetation.

Since about 70% of my stalking is on ground like that, I carry them most of the time.

They are less useful on very open ground (like open hillside), where shots are at long range taken prone, and they are an active hindrance in thick woodland. I missed chances on two deer last night because I bumped into them suddenly at very short range in thick woods, and could easily have taken a snap shot offhand if I hadn't been carrying sticks.

There are a thousand different recipes, but I currently use a pair of garden canes tied together with an old bootlaces wrapped in electrical tape, and they work flawlessly.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Hi All:

I have been told by the pros to get a pair....Problem is that I am from the States and we just never use them, I find them cumbersome and heavy, and find I can often get a pretty accurate shot in a sitting position. So whats the point?

It may seem like a no-brainer to you, but do I really need them?

And Which should I start out with - Mono, Bi- , tri - or Quad-pod?

Please help, and if anyone has a spare pair they want to post to me for a small fee to get me started, I would appreciate it.

Thanks

-Z
A couple of things you need to understand:

1) Stalking is a relatively new sport in the UK - yes its been going on for a very long time, but until comparatively recently stalking meant crawling on your belly over Scottish Mountains. 20 years ago, apart from in Deer parks there were very few dear in and around the South East of England, but the explosion in the Muntjac population, along with quite bit of new wood land planting has meant that deer are now very numerous. Lots of people have taken up stalking. But most stalkers have not grown up with rifles and haven't spent years and thousands of rounds learning how to shoot. Most amateur stalkers probably shoot 20 to 40 rounds a year if that. A rest of any sort, in particular a pair of sticks can make a big difference to accurate shot placement. We don't have the range facilities in the UK that allow lots of freehand shooting practice - most ranges are either prone or seated firing positions.

2) Many pros, who are making their living, or least offsetting their stalking costs by taking out paying guests often insist on shooting aids because they see too often a stalker turn up and not be able to put a bullet cleanly through the heart / lung area on a deer. Also many pros sell the venison - its a major portion of their income - and if you are taking a broadside shot you need to be very precise in your shot placement to not damage one, other or both shoulders. Working on the basis of the lowest common denominator, most pros these days will insist their guests use sticks and / or a bipod.


There is also a wee matter of product placement - a lot of the Youtube videos, Fieldsports Britain etc have been supplied with the latest kit and hence they are using it on the videos - this gets disseminated elsewhere. I have picked up quite a few modern rifles and with their large scopes and big moderators they are of a weight and balance that would be difficult to shoot with sticks. Also a scope on a mag of anything over 6 or 7x shows a lot of wobble.

Like Mungo above I have used sticks quite a bit. I have a pair of telescoping sticks and now that I stalk with my dog on a lead I tend to carry them folded up on a piece of string over my shoulder, only deploying them when I am likely to get a shot. Saying that I have recently not been bothering with them as ground I have been stalking either has enough features - trees, fence posts etc to use or its been more open ground where I have been taking prone shots either off a pack or indeed off a bipod.

In terms of sticks a pair of hazzle wands, or failing that B&Q garden canes tied together with a bungee are perfectly adequate. Some people like them long, I like mine about chest high as I find dropping one knee to the ground makes you very much more stable, yet still gives enough height over objects etc.

But if you are confident in shooting without then life is so much better without them!

Edit - I would also qualify my above statements in that whilst I like to try and recover as much meat as possible I tend to take a centre of shoulder shot which gives plenty of room for error, deer to move etc - all the venison is for home consumption and I really don't like taking head or neck shots - far too much room for error. Last summer Bushwear sent out a free half sized Roe buck target - I set it up at about 60 yds and got a couple of boxes of 22lr ammo. Over the course of an afternoon I put those into the kill zone from a variety of sitting, kneeling and standing positions - all without sticks. yes there were a couple of misses, but they were clean misses and a few would have made a bit of a mess - struck the spine etc, but save for the clean misses they would have all killed humanely and quickly. Gives you a huge amount of confidence.
 
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rem284

Well-Known Member
Quad sticks for me are the answer. There are only two disadvantages in using them, that is the time taken to deploy and the physical act of carrying them. However you can spend a lot of time and effort when hunting only to get into a situation where you cant find a steady position to take a shot. I would not like to be without them
 

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