Shotgun Cartridges, Colour Coding

tiffl

Member
My name is Tiffany Lees and I am a student studying BA (Hons) Business Management.

As part of my final year dissertation project, I am investigating whether the procedure of colour coding shotgun cartridge cases, should be reintroduced as standard industry practice to promote user safety, or whether it's not necessary.

Shooting is a passion on mine, and I wanted to include it within my dissertation topic. I am therefore asking if you would agree to participate in my research by answering a very short questionnaire. I would be very grateful to hear your thoughts on this matter.

Just click the link: http://goo.gl/forms/TplbvxFJk2

Thank you.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I think that if ALL 12 Bore shot guns were the same colour, say red, then more likely to arise would be issues of 70mm cartridges being inadvertently chambered in 65mm guns. As being plastic the lettering on the outside soon wears off under handling. Thus for me I know that any black colour 12 bore cartridges I have are 65mm and any red colour 12 bore cartridges I have are 70mm.

I am just three years short of being sixty years old. So I can remember when paper cased cartridges were the usual "fodder" and plastic was only just coming in. 20 Bore were BUFF in paper if Eley-Kynoch. 65mm (although we knew them then as 2 1/2") Eley-Kynock were orange. Think Impax, Grand Prix and Special Trap etc, etc. Whereas long 70mm 12 Bore such as Alpahamx were red.

Unless my memory fails!

The other, little known, issue is that 16 Bore cartridges can be inadvertently loaded into a 10 Bore. Or 28 Bore into a 16 Bore. I can't recall which one it is.

But what I can say with certainty is that many people would never tolerate a 20 Bore and a 12 Bore in the same household. Ours did but we never had the problem of loading a 20 into a 12. YOU JUST MADE SURE YOU CHECKED YOUR POCKETS!!
 
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private fraser

Well-Known Member
I'm in the process of buying a 2 1/2" chambered gun and I already have a gun which has 3" chamber so it is a concern for me that the older gun doesn't get unsuitable cartridges.
Safety wise the cartridge marking thing is bonkers but, hey...it's always been that way.
Take the 20b going into the 12b gun then followed by a 12b cartridge.
Sounds unlikely but we all know it happens.
 

LuckyEddie

Well-Known Member
Should be fairly simple - main colour of cartridge would be the bore size; smaller banding on the cartridge would indicate length similar to the markings on resistors
image.jpg

So a 12g 65mm cartridge could be red with a blue band nearest the brass cap followed by a green band.
my tuppence worth anyway.

Ed
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Getting the commercial world to agree will be the difficult bit.
Anyone know if this is done anywhere in the world ?
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Shotgun shells used to be colored mostly by brand. Remington were green, Winchester red, etc. In the 1960s, when plastic shells were coming onto the market, Federal began color coding by gauge, for safety. It is very easy to drop a 20 gauge shell into a 12 gauge and have it slide into the forcing cone and lodge there, with enough room to load a 12 gauge shell behind it. When the 12b fires, there is no escape for the gases, and the 20b cartridge also detonates.

Federal first made 20 gauge in purple, but that does not stand out in a dark duck blind, so they industry went to yellow. Some European shells are still clear, like the Fiocchi buckshot, so there is not mistakenly putting buckshot or a slug load into a bird gun. Many use purple for 16 ga and black for 28 gauge, but yellow for 20 and red for 12 seem to be as close as it comes to a standard now. Some European makers will have six colors of 12.

Color coding is set by the International Ammunition Association, in conjunction with the various US, European, and individual country's groups.

You should go to Federal Cartridge's website and contact them.

Here is a video.
The post Lesson of the Day: The Meaning of Shotgun Shell Colors (VIDEO) appeared first on Guns.com.
2013-03-18 14:12:00

Source: http://www.guns.com/2013/03/18/lesson-of-the-day-the-meaning-of-shotgun-shell-colors-video/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lesson-of-the-day-the-meaning-of-shotgun-shell-colors-video

paper shells, US 1950s US plastic, 1960s Federal shells today

View attachment 51869View attachment 51870shell-colors-federal.jpg
 
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bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
I'm in the process of buying a 2 1/2" chambered gun and I already have a gun which has 3" chamber so it is a concern for me that the older gun doesn't get unsuitable cartridges.
Safety wise the cartridge marking thing is bonkers but, hey...it's always been that way.
Take the 20b going into the 12b gun then followed by a 12b cartridge.
Sounds unlikely but we all know it happens.
Saw it fifty years ago in my first job,shooting pigeons on a Saturday afternoon with my boss, blew the barrel of his gun but luckily he was unhurt .

Enfieldspares, also remember as a youngster cartridges were hard to come by head keeper used to give you a handful and expected you to be able to account for them all, one of his favourite ploys
was to send you to get four rabbits to feed the ferrets and he would give you four cartridges to do so, maybe why fifty years on the only thing I can shoot with a shotgun with any great degree of success are rabbits:lol:

However fooled him at one point managed to acquire 250 16b found that if you cut the case (paper cases of course as all cartridges where then) off a fired 12b it would slip neatly over a 16b cartridge allowing me to fire them in a 12, managed to supply whatever number of rabbits he sent me for , for quite some time don't think he ever twigged.:lol: :old:
 
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Alistair

Well-Known Member
I was under the impression that this was already the case, although unenforced? All makes of 20b carts that I have seen have been yellow whilst 12 come in just about every colour except yellow. Could just be coincidence and I don't own a 20b myself, but I used to use one with the school team before my own certificate and I know a few friends who use them. (one even has a pair of browning B325s, a 12 and a 20, which just seems like an accident waiting to happen to me).
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
My name is Tiffany Lees and I am a student studying BA (Hons) Business Management.

As part of my final year dissertation project, I am investigating whether the procedure of colour coding shotgun cartridge cases, should be reintroduced as standard industry practice to promote user safety, or whether it's not necessary.

Shooting is a passion on mine, and I wanted to include it within my dissertation topic. I am therefore asking if you would agree to participate in my research by answering a very short questionnaire. I would be very grateful to hear your thoughts on this matter.

Just click the link: http://goo.gl/forms/TplbvxFJk2

Thank you.
How was the information you acquired from when you ran the same survey on Pigeon Watch?

Tim.243
 

jubnut

Well-Known Member
I can see where people are coming from on this issue,

That said. Just be bloody careful what you put in your gun, if you are daft enough not to empty your pockets when going between shooting 20 and 12 bore and leave some cartridges behind or even mix them in your cartridge bag, then load them hastily in the heat of the moment, then you are daft enough to shunt another cartridge in behind, forgetting you have already loaded a barrel then really I don't think the colour of the cartridge is the issue.

If you are shooting with a 2 1\2 inch chambered gun, why the bloody hell have you got 2 3\4 inch cartridges on you? Or if you are shooting 2 3/4 chambers why is there a 3 inch magnum in your pocket.

Shooters have these dangers (or the certainly should have) drummed into them, they are all aware of the potential risk of these accidents occurring so why oh why mix cartridges in the first place?

It is simple. DO NOT CARRY CARTRIDGES THAT ARE UNSUITABLE FOR YOUR GUN!

do you take your .308 out and think it is okay to have a few .243 rounds in your bullet pouch?
 

gunner269

Well-Known Member
I've never seen the point of owning a 20b and then trying to replicate a 12b load in it. I wouldn't own a 20 and a 12 together for that reason, never mind the safety point. I've heard the arguments that as you get a bit older a 20b is lighter to carry, but as old Isaacs law states, you pay for this in recoil.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
tried to fill out the form but it appears to be closed

you can't legislate for stupidity though

if you can put a 20 bore cartridge in a 12 bore without realising (and then feed another one in after the FTF!) then no amount of colour coding is going to help you!

realistically how many incidences of this are there?
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Colour coding would make the one or two shells that shouldn't be there stand out.
It isn't fool proof but it helps....like wiring a 13a plug.
I would say it's a good idea, it's helped me in all the years I've worked in electronics ;).
 
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goathunter1

Well-Known Member
Some interesting stuff on here. Some people are very sure of themselves too. Lucky. I certainly am an advocate of only yellow for 20 bore. Hopefully in the worst case scenario your reticular activating system might twig the yellow colour. Might. And not at night at the ducks anyway!
I also read some stuff from what is obviously and educated audience about cartridge/chamber lengths. The uneducated have absolutely no knowledge of chamber lengths and just buy 12 bore cartridges. Preparing for the howls from those in the know who cannot imagine such a situation, I come across it on an almost daily basis and can assure you that I do know this as a fact. As for guns actually being in proof, well that's another can of worms!
 

Donkey Basher

Well-Known Member
Seem to remember as a kid in the 1970s picking up empties when beating etc. that .410 was red, 28g was a maroon colour, 20g was yellow, 16g was blue, 12g was orange and 10g was black(?) - this was back in the day when most cartridges were Eley and there was very little foreign stuff about. Then along came things like the all plastic Rotweill which was green (no 'brass' head).
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
Should be fairly simple - main colour of cartridge would be the bore size; smaller banding on the cartridge would indicate length similar to the markings on resistors
View attachment 51868

So a 12g 65mm cartridge could be red with a blue band nearest the brass cap followed by a green band.
my tuppence worth anyway.

Ed


I can hear all the colour blind people going - "not sure that's going to work too well for us....." I agree with the principle however, the colours will need to be chosen by those that know about these things. It's why our three pin plugs are wired blue, brow and yellow/green - everyone can distinguish between these colours - apparently.....
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
Colour coding would make the one or two shells that shouldn't be there stand out.
It isn't fool proof but it helps....like wiring a 13a plug.
I would say it's a good idea, it's helped me in all the years I've worked in electronics ;).
I too am a retired TV / Electronic Engineer.
I have bred Budgies since 1956 and use the resistor colour code to identify the youngsters bred from different parents.


For example I place a RED split ring on the leg of an offspring of Pair No. 2 .
They can be identified whilst in cage or aviary without catching them up to read the closed ring placed on the other leg whilst a baby in the nest.

HWH.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
nobody consciously puts 20 bore carts in the bag with 12's

what the colour coding doesn't account for is the loading in the heat of battle
I certainly don't look at each cartridge as I load it, it comes out of my pocket blind, goes into the gun blind.
you are too busy looking for the next bird or marking the one coming down

I grew up shooting 20 bore, I still do
my older family members all shot 12
I also now have a 12 bore
the chance of contamination is high from my experience.

I want to and make sure you can feel the case head in the chamber before I shut the gun
worse case scenario as with any Fail to Fire/Feed or misfire situation, you don't unload, reload or continue until the chamber, barrel and everything else is made safe and cleared.
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Lucky Eddy's suggestion is a bit complicated I think, best to Keep It Ssimple as they say.
A different colour for each cartridge so that any "strangers" are more easily spotted....that's gotta help guys, surely.
Is anyone arguing Against colour coding ?

As the saying goes, "never underestimate the ingenuity of fools" but that's no reason to not even try.

ps...let's face it though, it's never going to happen. Getting the commercial world to agree?...Nope.
 
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