Sika about to be declared an invasive species by the EU.

I actually love the little feckers.
Maybe ours are different but it takes a good hind to break 30Kg at the chiller .
One thing is certain, what we’re doing now isn’t working, time to try something different.
We used to drive them to the guns many many years ago, back when shotgun with 9 ball cartridges was all we had, labs and collies will easily handle them.
By many years ago I mean the early 70’s, ask your grandparents.👴👵
:lol: I would need to use a clairvoyant to speak to my Grandparents. As I am a grandparent I well remember most of the 1960's and certainly the 1970's.
 
Lots of them, in Wicklow you don’t get many stags of 50K and most hinds are banging off 30K chiller weights.
On the other hand, I don’t get to handle many roe, but the few bucks I’ve have got a grip of seemed to be around the same size as a hind.

Never seen a Sika Hind but a big roe buck for me is 17Kg. Think the heaviest I have ever had was about 18/19Kg
 
Norman Healy, who stalked many sika over many years, used to say there is a possible eradication method..................It's called NAPALM. It is not culturally, ethically or socially possible to use it for this purpose and neither is it "carbon neutral". :lol::rolleyes:
 
Lots of them, in Wicklow you don’t get many stags of 50K and most hinds are banging off 30K chiller weights.
On the other hand, I don’t get to handle many roe, but the few bucks I’ve have got a grip of seemed to be around the same size as a hind.
In south Kerry they may be a little larger (feeding on pasturage), I've only weighed a few, and no hinds. Dressed out they average 48.5 Kg. Sample probably too small, they certainly feel heavy enough when I'm grunting them out to recover them!:) You may be correct about the methods required to cull enough of them, though I'm not in favour of it. I love the venison and would hate to leave the carcasses unrecovered.
 
So what happens if a sika threads his way in and out of the border with N Ireland? Vermin, game, vergame, gamin?
Plenty of sika in NI already passed two dead on the main Rd to enniskillen last Thurs
Lots where I live if they move from field to field they can be in and out of the eu several times a day lol
 
What the EU is doing makes perfect sense.

They have a long list of species that are causing issues in certain areas within the EU but not others. The Irish are getting hung up about the rules concerning sika, but really this legislation isn't being introduced to sort an Irish problem, it is to prevent those small populations of wild sika deer elsewhere in Europe from developing into the same intractable issue that is seen in Ireland and Scotland. The regulations impose restrictions on keeping, importing, selling, breeding and releasing these species.

The EU declared muntjac and grey squirrel invasive in 2016 while UK was still signed up to Europe, it made little difference in the UK but it certainly has helped reduce the number of muntjac introductions that were occurring in Ireland, Belgium and France following the rule change, and made it much easier for the Irish to legislate an open deer season for the few muntjac that did appear.

Nobody expected the UK on foot of EU rules to attempt to eradicate it's muntjac, nor will the EU or Irish government be able to affect sika deer numbers other than making it easier for them to relax open seasons. This obviously wasn't an issue for the UK regarding muntjac, which had no closed season anyway. However the rapid expansion of sika on the island of Ireland (Tipperary, Clare, Galway, Mayo, Cavan and Antrim) wasn't by range expansion it was by the very means that will be banned if sika are added to this list. Putting sika on the invasive list should have happened years ago.

Other mammal species were being traded and released around Europe. Raccoons were sold as pets and are destructive when feral as they are in much of Northern Europe. The Irish should be grateful that they are listed as invasive within the EU.

Whitetailed deer were introduced into Finland in the 1930s and for years tipped along causing few problems. More recently numbers have exploded, whitetails are starting to show up in Czech Republic and a few other places. Expect them to appear on the EU invasive list soon, again Finnish hunters will get excited, locally nothing much will change, but it will be harder for some estate owner in France or somewhere to get hold of breeding stock and release them, as happened with muntjac.
 
What the EU is doing makes perfect sense.

They have a long list of species that are causing issues in certain areas within the EU but not others. The Irish are getting hung up about the rules concerning sika, but really this legislation isn't being introduced to sort an Irish problem, it is to prevent those small populations of wild sika deer elsewhere in Europe from developing into the same intractable issue that is seen in Ireland and Scotland. The regulations impose restrictions on keeping, importing, selling, breeding and releasing these species.

The EU declared muntjac and grey squirrel invasive in 2016 while UK was still signed up to Europe, it made little difference in the UK but it certainly has helped reduce the number of muntjac introductions that were occurring in Ireland, Belgium and France following the rule change, and made it much easier for the Irish to legislate an open deer season for the few muntjac that did appear.

Nobody expected the UK on foot of EU rules to attempt to eradicate it's muntjac, nor will the EU or Irish government be able to affect sika deer numbers other than making it easier for them to relax open seasons. This obviously wasn't an issue for the UK regarding muntjac, which had no closed season anyway. However the rapid expansion of sika on the island of Ireland (Tipperary, Clare, Galway, Mayo, Cavan and Antrim) wasn't by range expansion it was by the very means that will be banned if sika are added to this list. Putting sika on the invasive list should have happened years ago.

Other mammal species were being traded and released around Europe. Raccoons were sold as pets and are destructive when feral as they are in much of Northern Europe. The Irish should be grateful that they are listed as invasive within the EU.

Whitetailed deer were introduced into Finland in the 1930s and for years tipped along causing few problems. More recently numbers have exploded, whitetails are starting to show up in Czech Republic and a few other places. Expect them to appear on the EU invasive list soon, again Finnish hunters will get excited, locally nothing much will change, but it will be harder for some estate owner in France or somewhere to get hold of breeding stock and release them, as happened with muntjac.
some real common sense spoke there
 
What the EU is doing makes perfect sense.

They have a long list of species that are causing issues in certain areas within the EU but not others. The Irish are getting hung up about the rules concerning sika, but really this legislation isn't being introduced to sort an Irish problem, it is to prevent those small populations of wild sika deer elsewhere in Europe from developing into the same intractable issue that is seen in Ireland and Scotland. The regulations impose restrictions on keeping, importing, selling, breeding and releasing these species.

The EU declared muntjac and grey squirrel invasive in 2016 while UK was still signed up to Europe, it made little difference in the UK but it certainly has helped reduce the number of muntjac introductions that were occurring in Ireland, Belgium and France following the rule change, and made it much easier for the Irish to legislate an open deer season for the few muntjac that did appear.

Nobody expected the UK on foot of EU rules to attempt to eradicate it's muntjac, nor will the EU or Irish government be able to affect sika deer numbers other than making it easier for them to relax open seasons. This obviously wasn't an issue for the UK regarding muntjac, which had no closed season anyway. However the rapid expansion of sika on the island of Ireland (Tipperary, Clare, Galway, Mayo, Cavan and Antrim) wasn't by range expansion it was by the very means that will be banned if sika are added to this list. Putting sika on the invasive list should have happened years ago.

Other mammal species were being traded and released around Europe. Raccoons were sold as pets and are destructive when feral as they are in much of Northern Europe. The Irish should be grateful that they are listed as invasive within the EU.

Whitetailed deer were introduced into Finland in the 1930s and for years tipped along causing few problems. More recently numbers have exploded, whitetails are starting to show up in Czech Republic and a few other places. Expect them to appear on the EU invasive list soon, again Finnish hunters will get excited, locally nothing much will change, but it will be harder for some estate owner in France or somewhere to get hold of breeding stock and release them, as happened with muntjac.

Thank you for posting.
 
What the EU is doing makes perfect sense.

They have a long list of species that are causing issues in certain areas within the EU but not others. The Irish are getting hung up about the rules concerning sika, but really this legislation isn't being introduced to sort an Irish problem, it is to prevent those small populations of wild sika deer elsewhere in Europe from developing into the same intractable issue that is seen in Ireland and Scotland. The regulations impose restrictions on keeping, importing, selling, breeding and releasing these species.

The EU declared muntjac and grey squirrel invasive in 2016 while UK was still signed up to Europe, it made little difference in the UK but it certainly has helped reduce the number of muntjac introductions that were occurring in Ireland, Belgium and France following the rule change, and made it much easier for the Irish to legislate an open deer season for the few muntjac that did appear.

Nobody expected the UK on foot of EU rules to attempt to eradicate it's muntjac, nor will the EU or Irish government be able to affect sika deer numbers other than making it easier for them to relax open seasons. This obviously wasn't an issue for the UK regarding muntjac, which had no closed season anyway. However the rapid expansion of sika on the island of Ireland (Tipperary, Clare, Galway, Mayo, Cavan and Antrim) wasn't by range expansion it was by the very means that will be banned if sika are added to this list. Putting sika on the invasive list should have happened years ago.

Other mammal species were being traded and released around Europe. Raccoons were sold as pets and are destructive when feral as they are in much of Northern Europe. The Irish should be grateful that they are listed as invasive within the EU.

Whitetailed deer were introduced into Finland in the 1930s and for years tipped along causing few problems. More recently numbers have exploded, whitetails are starting to show up in Czech Republic and a few other places. Expect them to appear on the EU invasive list soon, again Finnish hunters will get excited, locally nothing much will change, but it will be harder for some estate owner in France or somewhere to get hold of breeding stock and release them, as happened with muntjac.
You seem to have an odd notion of the "Irish" and our thoughts on any invasive species. Having no closed season for Muntjac was never likely to be a challenge for the government. Grey squirrels have no closed season and have never had one, but the native Reds are fully protected. The only reason Sika are worthy of comment is because they currently enjoy the same closed seasons as Red and Fallow (only the Red are native to Ireland). The change at EU level might result in removing the protections they currently enjoy, but I hardly think the EU mainland is concerned about Sika from Ireland acting as a respository to upset their ambition of eradication. I can say that in the southwest of the country and in the Dublin, Kildare & Wicklow area there is an appetite for reducing the numbers of Sika but not eliminating them, far too challenging and expensive a project and the government has more than enough on its plate currently. :)
 
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