Sika hind

VSS

Well-Known Member
I’ve never hung a beast for butchering in skin if I’m honest. And if I was going to, for what ever reason you may need to I would just leave the head on. I’d be nervous of contamination cutting through the skin into the neck.
Thanks. Might try that next time. Deer carcasses are generally hung "in skin" to prevent the meat from drying out too much during the maturation period. Unlike a mutton carcass, which has a thick layer of fat to do the same job. Also, sheep don't have such long necks!
Much easier to skin a warm carcass though, so I can see the attraction of hanging deer without their skin.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Thanks. Might try that next time. Deer carcasses are generally hung "in skin" to prevent the meat from drying out too much during the maturation period. Unlike a mutton carcass, which has a thick layer of fat to do the same job. Also, sheep don't have such long necks!

Much easier to skin a warm carcass though, so I can see the attraction of hanging deer without their skin.
Easier to make less of the meat's eating qualities by skinning too early and thereby either shortening the maturation period, or drying the carcass out also; but still, anything for an easy life, eh? :rofl:
 
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VSS

Well-Known Member
I agree, and for that reason I hang deer carcasses in skin. However, some people clearly do skin them before hanging, presumably because it's easier (which it undoubtedly is!). I wonder if they have to take steps to prevent drying, or do they simply accept some lose of quality as a fair price to pay for an easier job? Or maybe the loss of quality isn't as significant as we think?
It takes me less than 10 minutes to skin a fresh killed lamb, and a heck of a lot longer than that to skin a week dead cold deer, so I can understand the temptation.

Anyway, I'll try hanging in skin with head on, and see if that has any benefits as suggested by the earlier poster.
 

Dkuk

Member
I hang them a week tops as sika is pretty strong I found it's good enough skinned warm and hung a few days then butcher.
On another plus side when hung in skin the hair follicles start dying off and when skinning you can end up with a fairish of hair on them.
Also I've noticed when you skin a deer hung it does go a bit wetter when butchered.
I have a porkka cold room so the drying out might not be as bad in one of these I'm not sure .
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
I did see a larder where they left the heads on, just attached by the skin. The head was removed the next day.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
"It takes me less than 10 minutes to skin a fresh killed lamb, and a heck of a lot longer than that to skin a week dead cold deer, so I can understand the temptation."

Oh deer! I'm wondering what 'technique' you're using to take so long? :oops:
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
"It takes me less than 10 minutes to skin a fresh killed lamb, and a heck of a lot longer than that to skin a week dead cold deer, so I can understand the temptation."

Oh deer! I'm wondering what 'technique' you're using to take so long? :oops:
The same technique as used by most people, as far as I know. Done it the same way for the past 33 years, since I first started killing my own sheep. Maybe I just go carefully? Any faster seems to end up ripping the flesh.
 

foxdropper

Well-Known Member
Once back legs are skinned it’s a doddle surely mate ,down to the the neck anyway .
I can do a fallow doe in about 10 minutes .
 

Dkuk

Member
I could do the same if freshly killed. Probably even quicker. It's just the ones hung in skin for a week that I struggle with.
When I next hang one in skin IL do a vid and see it it helps.
I used to work for a gamedealer and we skinned one or Two and tried differant methods.
 
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Freeforester

Well-Known Member
I did a vid here this morning, but can't yet get it uploaded, the pc here is playing up (pre walking Scotsman, let alone the flying one!). I'll take a series of pics next time!
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Tools and ingredients needed:
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Carcass;

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Gambrel with loops (amsteel, wire, rope, any providing its strong enough), trip ever or blunt ended knife, small knife;

Method:
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Insert blunt ended knife at inner side of each foreleg, running the knife up toward the gullet, not the underarm-pit;

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Slit through the tendons at base of remaining foreleg, which gives your loops somewhere to settle into and this prevent slipping;
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Carcass now hung by forelegs, note exit cuts. The only other cut you need to make is through the tail. Now, get going, pull the skin down and away from the carcass, ensuring any hair dirt debris lands on the ore soaked floor and not on the carcass. Done this way there is no need for as much as a hair or a paw print to be put on the carcass. Part two follows.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
IMG_2072.JPG
Making a start;

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Skin comes awaynwith reasonable effort and technique; repeat on on ther side, cutting head off at atlas joint (this one shot through there, so came off readily);

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Continue with the downward trend!
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Having freed the tail between joints, you can put the knife away, and barrel skin the haunches; don't pull too hard, slow and steady does the job, watch out for the silversides sticking to the skin at this stage - steady as she goes;
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Almost there, hang up the beast the other way around again, and you are ready to do the butchering.

I respectfully suggest this method is superior in terms of the cleanliness of the skinned carcass, if you give it a try, you may be pleasantly surprised. Two weeks hung, not ten minutes to cleanly skin. Hope this is of help.
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
Thankyou
She had a short jaw which I spotted and took her out as winter could take a toll on her with
short grass she could have struggled .
Funnily enough the only undershot jaws I have seen have been on sika (Forest of Bowland) and there seems to be a few on them in one particular herd (not ground I manage.)
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Took longer to upload than to do, Paul; tiger stripes look pretty also, but don't really add much weight to the produce! I wouldn't advocate anyone beating themselves up if they tear the stripey bits, but the lass that gets the skins off ye for leather, etc would love you more if you don't leave them on the skin. Clean carcass, clean skin, simple to do. :thumb:
 

Dkuk

Member
View attachment 142681
Making a start;

View attachment 142682
Skin comes awaynwith reasonable effort and technique; repeat on on ther side, cutting head off at atlas joint (this one shot through there, so came off readily);

View attachment 142683
Continue with the downward trend!
View attachment 142684
Having freed the tail between joints, you can put the knife away, and barrel skin the haunches; don't pull too hard, slow and steady does the job, watch out for the silversides sticking to the skin at this stage - steady as she goes;
View attachment 142685
Almost there, hang up the beast the other way around again, and you are ready to do the butchering.

I respectfully suggest this method is superior in terms of the cleanliness of the skinned carcass, if you give it a try, you may be pleasantly surprised. Two weeks hung, not ten minutes to cleanly skin. Hope this is of help.
I've never done a deer inverted like a lamb but it looks a cracking job
 

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