Sika spotted near Hawick/A68

jamross65

Well-Known Member
JR I think it is a certainty that they will filter across the A74. Here the original population in a park on Dochfour on the north side of Loch Ness managed to get across the very busy Caladonian Canal and thrive all along the south side in a matter of a few years. It is strange however that they often move through ,what seems to me to be suitable ground, and colonise an area beyond it maybe staying put here till population pressure moves them on. Yet they don't move back to the area they crossed. Something must not suit in theses areas.

David
Problem nowadays is the volume of traffic on that road to let any real number break over, but your probably right. We have had similar experiences over the years where you would expect them to be in a particular area but they don't really show in numbers, yet a mile away there is large populations.
 

Von

Well-Known Member
I have just received an email from my deer management group referencing a sighting of a Sika hind above Stow off the A7. The info was passed onto the group by a FC member of staff.

As quoted in email sent:

"The location is just off the Moorfoot Hills and thebeast was
travelling north east. Definitely no dainty little skipping Roe, but a
rather large well built hind with attitude"

Coincidental or what!!

 

jamross65

Well-Known Member
I have just received an email from my deer management group referencing a sighting of a Sika hind above Stow off the A7. The info was passed onto the group by a FC member of staff.

As quoted in email sent:

"The location is just off the Moorfoot Hills and thebeast was
travelling north east.Definitely no dainty little skipping Roe, but a
rather large well built hind with attitude"

Coincidental or what!!
That's interesting Allan as a mate of mine swears blind he saw a Sika hind a few years ago on his ground that marches Cathpair at Stow. He even went over to where she had been standing and found the slot marks, twice the size of a roe which confirmed it for him.

At this rate I better keep an eye on the garden trees as we are only 5 miles from stow!!!!
 

PKL

Well-Known Member
That's interesting Allan as a mate of mine swears blind he saw a Sika hind a few years ago on his ground that marches Cathpair at Stow. He even went over to where she had been standing and found the slot marks, twice the size of a roe which confirmed it for him.

At this rate I better keep an eye on the garden trees as we are only 5 miles from stow!!!!
I did put up pictures a few years ago of a sika hind with calf from between hawick and edgerston tofts...was laughed out of here...
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
I used to regularly see a group of 3 sika on a clearfell/restock on the west side of the 74 altho its been a few years since i seen them now.

Off those who have sika would u prefer to turn the clock back to when u had higher numbers of Roe? Or do u prefer the sika stalking?

From the little i know and have stalked on sika them seey to be very hard to stalk fairly unpredicatable and very much first and last light, althou my mates tend to stalk throu the day 8ish onwards and usually see deer out on the heather and quite often manage to grass 1, yet they seem to be going aggainst most common advice on sika
Whereas ur roe tend to be far more dependable if u know ur deer and the ground u should stand a good change of catching up with them. They also don't do too much damage to trees if not to many and only for the first 5 or so years

Wether ur a hobby or pro stalker mibee u should be thankfull for the roe u have and mibee just appreciate them, rather than hoping for the sika to move in u may regret not shooting them out before they get a proper foothold
 

Ranger22

Well-Known Member
The Sika stalking is one of the best experiences you'll get. Would I go back to having just Roe, no chance. But from a foresters point of view it's the last species of deer they want in a block. They damage all age of trees not just young ones.

Al
 

jamross65

Well-Known Member
I used to regularly see a group of 3 sika on a clearfell/restock on the west side of the 74 altho its been a few years since i seen them now.

Off those who have sika would u prefer to turn the clock back to when u had higher numbers of Roe? Or do u prefer the sika stalking?

From the little i know and have stalked on sika them seey to be very hard to stalk fairly unpredicatable and very much first and last light, althou my mates tend to stalk throu the day 8ish onwards and usually see deer out on the heather and quite often manage to grass 1, yet they seem to be going aggainst most common advice on sika
Whereas ur roe tend to be far more dependable if u know ur deer and the ground u should stand a good change of catching up with them. They also don't do too much damage to trees if not to many and only for the first 5 or so years

Wether ur a hobby or pro stalker mibee u should be thankfull for the roe u have and mibee just appreciate them, rather than hoping for the sika to move in u may regret not shooting them out before they get a proper foothold
They are my favourite species of all deer to stalk, but there is still something I love about roe stalking, possibly because I started on roe and there is a huge variance in the heads of bucks. And controlling roe does is relatively easy!

I think the the ideal scenario is to have ground that only has roe, and another area that has Sika!

I wouldnt want want to see good roe ground spoiled by the moving in of Sika but at the same time would pick stalking Sika over anything else, if that makes sense?
 

David Brown

Well-Known Member
The Sika stalking is one of the best experiences you'll get. Would I go back to having just Roe, no chance. But from a foresters point of view it's the last species of deer they want in a block. They damage all age of trees not just young ones.

Al
Talked with a local sporting agent last night who said for the first time he has had more requests for Sika stag stalking than for Reds . He states he could have sold his Sika stags many times over so there must be a lot of stalkers who would like the Sika experience or have tried it and want more!
I agree about the damage though and it's not uncommon to see 20 year old Norway spruce with 100 percent bark stripping damage in a stand of timber. Roe can also do their fair share too but do take the point that it's confined to the early years. Roe populations suffer far more from bad winters than Sika do. My Roe are only now beginning to recover from the mass death due to the deep , frozen snow of three years ago. Maybe I have too many Sika!!!!!
Last night after 9 pm my wife walked round the forest road with a few friends and they saw over 30 hinds many gleaming in newly grown in summer coats.

David
 

Von

Well-Known Member
That's interesting Allan as a mate of mine swears blind he saw a Sika hind a few years ago on his ground that marches Cathpair at Stow. He even went over to where she had been standing and found the slot marks, twice the size of a roe which confirmed it for him.

At this rate I better keep an eye on the garden trees as we are only 5 miles from stow!!!!
Being involved in the Forestry industry and privy to info of what work is planned for felling in the next 5 years due to the age of the soft wood forestry in the Tweed Valley and surrounding area's, I've no doubt during the next 5 years this will be the biggest disturbance the Borders Sika population will have experienced since their introduction.

Interesting times a head possibly
 

novice

Well-Known Member
Being involved in the Forestry industry and privy to info of what work is planned for felling in the next 5 years due to the age of the soft wood forestry in the Tweed Valley and surrounding area's, I've no doubt during the next 5 years this will be the biggest disturbance the Borders Sika population will have experienced since their introduction.

Interesting times a head possibly
I agree, but I don't think it will only be restricted to sika.

I've heard a fee recent examples of forestry felling operations leading to movement in red populations. I've also seen myself some localised roe movement from established forestry on my march as a result of felling.

The stags in the larger species have obvious reasons to move about at certain times of the year. The hinds obviously wait until they're turfed out before looking elsewhere :)

From what I understand, there are large sections of forestry up and down the country that is at a mature stage for felling. Perhaps we'll shortly be seeing the largest movement/expansion of deer populations since those moving into the post-war plantations all those years ago?

Novice
 

Von

Well-Known Member
"From what I understand, there are large sections of forestry up and down the country that is at a mature stage for felling. Perhaps we'll shortly be seeing the largest movement/expansion of deer populations since those moving into the post-war plantations all those years ago? "

Totally agree Novice! A real possibility of this happening
 

Tam16

Well-Known Member
I have added hoc sightings on my ground near Hass loch.

Had a couple spikes running about last year and a hind with calf.
A might need to eat humble pie as a lad. Phoned me the other day stating he had seen two not far from the hass
 

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