Single trigger to double trigger - easy transition?

boulders11

Well-Known Member
Morning all,

I am in the process of looking for a new side by side. Since I first started shooting I have always shot a single trigger gun, whether it was my over and under, semi-auto or my single trigger side by side.

As there is a greater availability of double trigger side by side shotguns I am wondering whether it is easy to get use to double triggers considering I have always used a single trigger?

Perhaps anyone on SD has made the transition?

Thanks in advance, Joe.
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
I've had problems going the other way around when I removed my finger from the single trigger to look for the rear one, and as it wasn't there, missed the chance of a second shot. But you adapt quickly, I wouldn't worry about it if I were you.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I have both. To be honest, as far as practicality goes double triggers don't take much to get used to. And in real-life use they're not any disadvantage for typical shooting. My S/S has a double, and my O/U has a single trigger..........I don't think I've ever actually given it any though when shooting.

Just don't do what a novice friend of mine once did, and think that two triggers means a finger on each!!! He only did that once :lol:
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Two or three boxes of cartridges at clays and you will soon get the hang of it. I've had the fun of going the other way. I use side by side and over and under with a double trigger. Also have a Rizzini over and under with single and used semi autos. I have to think a wee bit, but it's no different to say an auto mastic or non auto safety.

Going to to a side by side is probably easier as a side by side looks and feels very different so less brain scrambling.

In practice a double trigger is probably faster - front trigger is on the tip of your finger - fire a finger slips back onto the back trigger which can then be fired. With a single you have to release the trigger to reset it for the next barrel.
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Single triggers on budget guns = trouble.
As pointed out above,double triggers can be faster.
You're doing the right thing and will love it when you get the hang of it.
 

boulders11

Well-Known Member
Single triggers on budget guns = trouble.
As pointed out above,double triggers can be faster.
You're doing the right thing and will love it when you get the hang of it.
I am looking to get a custom made William Powell, although to have a single selective trigger is an extra £1,100 - rather expensive I think. Hence, why I asked about the transition.. I guess it will take time and a fair amount of practice with the clays!
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
I am looking to get a custom made William Powell,
Oh nice. That's not something I'd do as it's not a sensible thing to spend a load of money on when you're as unremarkable a shotgun shot as I. But good choice! I've noticed some of the old makers like William Powell and William Evans coming up with more "affordable" options that the previous "Best London" ones, mostly made in Spain or Italy but finished or assembled here, which shows a bit of commercial foresight. The positioning means that there is some sort of domestic market again, which there isn't really anymore for the £30-50k price bracket.
 

RED-DOT

Well-Known Member
The William Powell continental range are made by Arrieta in Italy and like the Mcnab Highlander and Lowlander will struggle to hold their value in the near future.
Do look at Berettas SBS as they are made in house and offer great value and of course a single trigger.
 

Alistair

Well-Known Member
I had few problems when I bought a sbs with double triggers. Couple of embarrassing moments at the clay ground but 100 carts and I was ok with it.
 

bambislayer

Well-Known Member
The William Powell continental range are made by Arrieta in Italy and like the Mcnab Highlander and Lowlander will struggle to hold their value in the near future.
Do look at Berettas SBS as they are made in house and offer great value and of course a single trigger.
I'd agree, that the Beretta would be the most sensible purchase [gives you an option of multi choke as well]

I have always used both single and double triggers as well as auto and non auto safeties, without any trouble. Personally, I'd go for double triggers on a game gun.
 

Oh6

Well-Known Member
I am wondering whether it is easy to get use to double triggers considering I have always used a single trigger?
I have single and double trigger shotguns and never give it any thought when switching between the two.

It may help that the double triggers are on a straight stock and the single on a pistol grip though.

You may try and straighten the front trigger on a double trigger shotgun, or pull off the trigger guard on a single trigger gun a couple of times, but after that I doubt that you'll ever think about it again.

Just go and shoot a round or two of clays and you'll be fine by the end of it.
 

ChrisWill184

Well-Known Member
I have both. To be honest, as far as practicality goes double triggers don't take much to get used to. And in real-life use they're not any disadvantage for typical shooting. My S/S has a double, and my O/U has a single trigger..........I don't think I've ever actually given it any though when shooting.
This is how it is for me. Though I started shooting with double triggers and went to single. Still take out the side-by-side with double triggers every once in a while and it never even crosses my mind. You just get used to it.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
The William Powell continental range are made by Arrieta in Italy and.....will struggle to hold their value in the near future.
I couldn't agree more. I have seen and handled a number of these. The engraving is simply...well shall I say not to my taste.

If you are going for a single trigger side-by-side then I'd look at the tried and trusted Beretta, the Japanese Miroku or the BSA branded Japanese SKB, or a good old but heavy, heavy, heavy, Winchester 21 or 23.

I would not accept these new William Powell guns as a gift.
 

boulders11

Well-Known Member
I couldn't agree more. I have seen and handled a number of these. The engraving is simply...well shall I say not to my taste.

If you are going for a single trigger side-by-side then I'd look at the tried and trusted Beretta, the Japanese Miroku or the BSA branded Japanese SKB, or a good old but heavy, heavy, heavy, Winchester 21 or 23.

I would not accept these new William Powell guns as a gift.
Very interesting. The only appeal of the William Powell custom mades is that they are "custom" to the person and not just "off the shelf" so to speak. Whether they hold their value is something which I don't mind about as I will not be selling it if I decide to buy one.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Actually these William Powel, William Evans, Dicksons and many others are doing nothing different to whole host of box loacks and sidelocks that were "made" by all the provincial and "London" makers in the past. The vast majority were made by Birmingham "guild makers" - mostly Webly, but plenty of others as well, including Belgian and then Spanish and shipped in various stages of finish to the "gunmaker / retailer" for his customer. Only thing different these days is that they are using Italian and Spanish makers.

Beretta's are nice and good and solid and reliable, but and its a very big but, I would never buy one as do not want a gun with "Read Manual Before use and a whole host of other warnings" stamped along the barrels.

The high vlaue Berettas also loose value pretty steeply after new price, but so do new English made guns as well.
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Actually these William Powel, William Evans, Dicksons and many others are doing nothing different to whole host of box loacks and sidelocks that were "made" by all the provincial and "London" makers in the past. The vast majority were made by Birmingham "guild makers" - mostly Webly, but plenty of others as well, including Belgian and then Spanish and shipped in various stages of finish to the "gunmaker / retailer" for his customer. Only thing different these days is that they are using Italian and Spanish makers...
That's true, and folk got guns that are now classics, give good service and have held value.
The op is having a bespoke gun made and that's a life experience, nice one.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
The William Powell continental range are made by Arrieta in Italy and like the Mcnab Highlander and Lowlander will struggle to hold their value in the near future.
Do look at Berettas SBS as they are made in house and offer great value and of course a single trigger.
None of these, as new guns, £2,000 or £30,000, are going to hold their value. If buying new, I would be sure I really liked it. William Powell, Evans, Greener, all those old guns, are great. It is surprising how many of the older off-the-rack English guns there are in the US. The Spanish and Italian guns are really good. Some of the older ones are shameless copies of the H&H and others. The better Arietta, AyA, Garbi, Guerini, Rizzini are all solid and well made. Merkel makes some nice double guns at not terrible prices. I really like the Beretta SxSs, 12 and 20 ( don't own one).

My unsolicited advice:

Unless you are familiar with a lot of shotguns and know exactly what you want, I suggest buying an older SxS, like a William Powell, and shoot it, and sell it for what you paid. In the interim, take some instruction in the SxS, like an intensive 4 or 5 day class. It is only a few hundred £, a fraction of the cost of a custom shotgun. That will tell you a lot about fit, weight, balance, as you are force to shoot all sorts of angles, including very high birds.

To answer your question about double triggers, it is the same as everyone else: you won't even think about it, like riding one bicycle and then another. I shoot pumps, semiautos, single trigger Browning O/U, and double triggers on an Ithaca, Lefever, AH Fox, Parker, and Churchill XXV, and don't even think about them.
 
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RED-DOT

Well-Known Member
My Beretta 627 EELL sbs 20g is probably my favourite game gun with the single trigger and game rib it is the best of both worlds. Lovely to swing and carry and takes 2 3/4" cartridges.
 

Hedgehopper

Well-Known Member
I am with Southern on this one. Unless you want to shoot heavy loads or lots of steel, an older gun is the way to go. If you are committed to a new gun and want something that looks like an English best, then you are better off with an AYA in my mind.

I am not a fan of the Beretta side by side, certainly well made and engineered but I didn't find the balance or weight suited me, but that is a personal thing.

Spend a couple of hundred quid getting really well fitted with a try gun then look for an older gun that meets that specification. It will be better than a Powell custom job.

If however, you want to push the gun hard, then you should go for a more modern gun. I have one syndicate where we shoot a lot (and I mean a lot) of very high duck. Heavy loads, lots of them and old guns do not make for good bed fellows. My old William Evans that was made for my great grand father managed to blow itself apart in my hands. Not funny. It was regularly serviced, I just pushed it too hard.

I now now use a silver pigeon on that shoot and it never lets me down. I am there tomorrow so hope that I am not tempting fate.

With regards to the triggers, I don't think you will find it a problem, I swap between double and single triggers depending on what I am shooting and have never found it to be a problem.

Just my tuppence worth
 

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