South Africa or Namibia?

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AdrianC

Well-Known Member
Seriously thinking about a first hunting safari in a couple of years time. From my initial research I am drawn to either South Africa or Namibia to fulfil my dream to hunt plains game.

Any pros or cons to either place or recommendations, hints and suggestions would be gratefully received as I embark on my plans.........
 

Bos en Dal Safaris

Well-Known Member
Hi Adrian

I would say both countries are great, but totally different. Why don't you just plan two safari's one for each country?;)

Good luck with your planning! i will be following the thread to see the other members responses.
 

Johno100

Well-Known Member
Ive hunted in both countries and had a great time in both , Ive visted the Thabazimi area which does seem to be all game farms and can feel canned but around Windhoek it seems a bit more wild with more open unfenced plains.Where ever you go dont just stay with your PH , hire a 4x4 and explore . Good Luck.
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
I've never hunted in SA (though I have visited several times) - but I have hunted in Namibia - and Zimbabwe and Tanzania.

The latter two countries are difficult and unaffordable for the average punter but I can thoroughly recommend Namibia - great value hunting wherever you go and a great experience. I would say there tend to be a relationship between the cost and the distance from Windhoel airport. The great thing about Namibia for me at any rate is the huge sense of space, common with many places in Africa, and the very small population - not always common. I would echo the last poster - go and explore - its not very cheap to hire a 4x4 but once you have it you are sorted with everything including camping gear. As long as you have some experience of off road driving you will be fine. I have done two self-drive safaries - one last year from Vic Falls to the Skeleton Coast and back to Windhoek (3600km) and one this year with four days hunting up into the Koakoveldt right to the Angolan border.

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JabaliHunter

Well-Known Member
my two tips would firstly be to look at hunting species in their native range rather than species that have been introduced into areas where they never occurred naturally; and secondly to give serious consideration to hunting in some of the larger 'concession' areas and not just the game ranches. This is just my personal preference and I'm not knocking anyone else's...
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
I've only hunted in SA, but have looked at Namibia. From what I can tell, and I'd be very interested to hear from those who have first hand experience in hunting both to see if I'm right, is that SA appears to be the cheapest place to hunt with Namibia in second place. Costs increse hugely when looking at Eastern Africa. Almost all areas in SA are fenced, try and find an uinfenced area in SA seems very difficult, and if anyone has any links to outfits operating in unfenced areas I'd be very interested to see them.

Namibia appears to have more opportunity to hunt in unfenced concession areas as the poster above states. It would be good to hear from any outfitters based in Namibia on this forum, as far as I can tell all the guys offering African hunts are based in SA.

I can fully understand where Jabali hunter is coming from when he says he'd prefer to hunt indiginous species in their native range. I confess I'd prefer to hunt a gemsbok in the Kalahari as opposed to a fenced area in SA, but in many cases this would not be affordable to many hunters. It would be good to see more Namibian info on here! :)
 

Johno100

Well-Known Member
I've only hunted in SA, but have looked at Namibia. From what I can tell, and I'd be very interested to hear from those who have first hand experience in hunting both to see if I'm right, is that SA appears to be the cheapest place to hunt with Namibia in second place. Costs increse hugely when looking at Eastern Africa. Almost all areas in SA are fenced, try and find an uinfenced area in SA seems very difficult, and if anyone has any links to outfits operating in unfenced areas I'd be very interested to see them.

Namibia appears to have more opportunity to hunt in unfenced concession areas as the poster above states. It would be good to hear from any outfitters based in Namibia on this forum, as far as I can tell all the guys offering African hunts are based in SA.

I can fully understand where Jabali hunter is coming from when he says he'd prefer to hunt indiginous species in their native range. I confess I'd prefer to hunt a gemsbok in the Kalahari as opposed to a fenced area in SA, but in many cases this would not be affordable to many hunters. It would be good to see more Namibian info on here! :)

I hunted with this guy some 10 years ago , Your game ranching hosts Malan and Barista Lambrecht, will have you returning, year after year, as you build your collection., had a great time .
 

Bos en Dal Safaris

Well-Known Member
I confess I'd prefer to hunt a gemsbok in the Kalahari as opposed to a fenced area in SA, but in many cases this would not be affordable to many hunters. It would be good to see more Namibian info on here! :)

i must tell you hunting unfenced areas as in Zim or other countries are impossible in SA because you don't get any unfenced areas. Even in the kalahari the gemsbok and springbok are fenced. Although it is lower fences it is still fenced as gemsbok and springbok do not jump fences they creep. I know springbok can jump very high but when it comes to an fence it is dumbstruck, they will jump into the fence even if it is only 4 ft high.

just my 2cents.

But as you rightly said it is better to hunt animals in their natural habitat as you are more likely to get better specimens there as with animals introduced to other areas.
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
i must tell you hunting unfenced areas as in Zim or other countries are impossible in SA because you don't get any unfenced areas. Even in the kalahari the gemsbok and springbok are fenced. Although it is lower fences it is still fenced as gemsbok and springbok do not jump fences they creep. I know springbok can jump very high but when it comes to an fence it is dumbstruck, they will jump into the fence even if it is only 4 ft high.

just my 2cents.

But as you rightly said it is better to hunt animals in their natural habitat as you are more likely to get better specimens there as with animals introduced to other areas.

Yeah, I do appreciate that just about everywhere in SA is fenced. To be honest I was shocked and surprised when I visited and realised this. I think most people have romantic ideas of large, open untouched African savannagh which isn;t really the case for most visiting hunters. I've spoken to a few people who were as surprised as me since first going. Though the farm I hunted on was very large and maintains self sustaining populations which live and act naturally, so for all intents and purposes the animals are wild. Though I did very naively visit a put and take ranch for an impala which was on the small size. I'll never make that mistake again.

It's interesting how you say the better specimens come from their native range though. I would have thought that with the breeding farm operations out there, the breeders could have selectively bred, larger and better animals than found in the wild. For example, park deer here in the UK often dwarf their wild counterparts, due to better feeding and genetics. :)
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
Guy's

Namibia is fenced and operate basically the same as the Kruger National Park! It is bigger area's...but still fenced. Namibia has 1st of all a low 'field carrying capacity' as what SA has, that is why their area's / farms are bigger than some of S.A's. But be assured that S.A has all the nescessary equipment for any Local / International hunter to have a hunt of a life time...

Face it guy's where in Africa you going to get 'free roaming' animals anymore...Botswana is closing down, Zambia is closed for 5 years...Private land looks like the way out...don't know, would like your opinion!
 
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Petecannon

Well-Known Member
​I have hunted on a few game farms in South Africa. The one farm was over 10,000 hectares and consisted of plains and ravines, the other was similar but was even bigger . Most game farms have to be game fenced to allow for hunting all year round. All game is completely wild and has to be managed in the same way as any national park in South Africa or in the UK, mainly due to a lack of natural predators. The size of the game farm is directly proportional to the caring capacity of the area and in more arid areas the farms need to be bigger to sustain the same amount of animals. As a general rule the farms in Namibia tend to be very large because they cannot support as many animals per hector and therefore give you more of a sense of being away from any human activity. Also, don't confuse your understanding of a typical game "farm" in Southern Africa with your understanding of farms in the UK - they are very different.
One thing you should insist on is a "walk and stalk" hunt and avoid shooting off the back of a vehicle, make it very clear to your host as to what your expectations are and bear in mind that different hunting techniques are used in different environments depending on the amount of time you have.
I had a great time on both these game farms and worked really hard for my Kudu and Oryx.
 

Bos en Dal Safaris

Well-Known Member
​I have hunted on a few game farms in South Africa. The one farm was over 10,000 hectares and consisted of plains and ravines, the other was similar but was even bigger . Most game farms have to be game fenced to allow for hunting all year round. All game is completely wild and has to be managed in the same way as any national park in South Africa or in the UK, mainly due to a lack of natural predators. The size of the game farm is directly proportional to the caring capacity of the area and in more arid areas the farms need to be bigger to sustain the same amount of animals. As a general rule the farms in Namibia tend to be very large because they cannot support as many animals per hector and therefore give you more of a sense of being away from any human activity. Also, don't confuse your understanding of a typical game "farm" in Southern Africa with your understanding of farms in the UK - they are very different.
One thing you should insist on is a "walk and stalk" hunt and avoid shooting off the back of a vehicle, make it very clear to your host as to what your expectations are and bear in mind that different hunting techniques are used in different environments depending on the amount of time you have.
I had a great time on both these game farms and worked really hard for my Kudu and Oryx.

+1:thumb:
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
Guy's

Namibia is fenced and operate basically the same as the Kruger National Park! It is bigger area's...but still fenced. Namibia has 1st of all a low 'field carrying capacity' as what SA has, that is why their area's / farms are bigger than some of S.A's. But be assured that S.A has all the nescessary equipment for any Local / International hunter to have a hunt of a life time...

Face it guy's where in Africa you going to get 'free roaming' animals anymore...Botswana is closing down, Zambia is closed for 5 years...Private land looks like the way out...don't know, would like your opinion!

Can you not hunt free roaming animals in Tanzania? Are western bongo hunts not free ranging in their native range? I appreciate the costs are far higher than the likes of SA, but I believe from what I've read that they are true free range hunts?

I'm given the impression that there is also areas in Namibia open to hunting that are not fenced? Are you saying this is not the case?
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
Can you not hunt free roaming animals in Tanzania? Are western bongo hunts not free ranging in their native range? I appreciate the costs are far higher than the likes of SA, but I believe from what I've read that they are true free range hunts?

I'm given the impression that there is also areas in Namibia open to hunting that are not fenced? Are you saying this is not the case?

I hunted in Tanzania for ten years - as a resident - and no land is fenced apart from the 'shambas' - small scale farms. I really did not appreciate at the time but this was really eden - I could at one time buy a license with up to eight animals on it (including buffalo) for the whole of the Masai Steppe - several tens of thousands of square miles stiff with game. The downside to this, which the tourist hunter pays for through his daily rate of US$1,000+, is that it is very difficult - you need to take not only the kitchen sink but the water to put in it. Organising a safari for complaining Americans under those conditions is very far from easy - I knew a good few PH's during my time there - and you hear the stories. People are strange.

There are large concession areas in Namibia which are open to hunting but generally these are in either the semi-desert Namib fringes or in the Caprivi strip which is a bit more restricted. Numbers of animals available on licence are limited and hence costs are high. I have never hunted in these areas but have visited on safari and feel very priviledged to have done so.

I visited Zambia last year (Kafue National Park) and was astonished at how little game there was - far less than on the majority of the open areas I hunted in Tanzania. I'm sure there are areas with game but generally it seemed that the management of the game there is in a mess and I don't think its a surprise that they have stopped hunting. Whether it has any effect will depend on how or if they remove the large quantities of arms in private hands.
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
Can you not hunt free roaming animals in Tanzania? Are western bongo hunts not free ranging in their native range? I appreciate the costs are far higher than the likes of SA, but I believe from what I've read that they are true free range hunts?

I'm given the impression that there is also areas in Namibia open to hunting that are not fenced? Are you saying this is not the case?

No, there is still area's open, but i think kuwinda nailed it spot on...SA has some Goverment ground open and you still can get a permit to hunt those area's (10 000 - 30 000ha), but the animal population is bad and mainly so due to poaching...
 
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JabaliHunter

Well-Known Member
Guy's

Namibia is fenced and operate basically the same as the Kruger National Park! It is bigger area's...but still fenced. Namibia has 1st of all a low 'field carrying capacity' as what SA has, that is why their area's / farms are bigger than some of S.A's. But be assured that S.A has all the nescessary equipment for any Local / International hunter to have a hunt of a life time...
There are some very good game (high) fenced hunting ranches which are huge, both in SA and Namibia, as well as in Zim (e.g. Cawston). There are conservancies and concession areas that aren't fenced. There are also areas (including in SA) that are only cattle (low) fenced (the same as most farmland areas in the UK) which of course will limit the roaming of some species, but not all...

Face it guy's where in Africa you going to get 'free roaming' animals anymore...Botswana is closing down, Zambia is closed for 5 years...Private land looks like the way out...don't know, would like your opinion!
In a hell of a lot of places! OMG, where to start?! Northern Namibia concession areas, Zimbabwe concession areas, Zambia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Cameroon, CAR, Ethiopia...
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
In a hell of a lot of places! OMG, where to start?! Northern Namibia concession areas, Zimbabwe concession areas, Zambia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Cameroon, CAR, Ethiopia...


JabaliHunter,

Yip i agree, only some questions come to mind!!

1. Cost of the hunt - expensive!!!; especially Tanzania, Cameroon and CAR - Not all hunters can affort expensive hunts...

2. Didn't Zambia closed down for 5 years or are in the process, but only High fence game on quota?

3. Where are you going to hunt the species only indigenous! to Namibia and/or SA?

4. Where in Zimbabwe or Mozambique you going to be able to hunt in the next 10-15 years, poaching is a big thing and its going to happen to Botswana to as what happened to Kenya...

5. Zim and Mozambique are still left, yes, but do you think they going to set out the quotas that the hunting fraternity requires? quotas is going to be a problem! and most probably Northern Namibia aslo...

just my 2 cents...
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
In a hell of a lot of places! OMG, where to start?! Northern Namibia concession areas, Zimbabwe concession areas, Zambia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Cameroon, CAR, Ethiopia...

I had a look at Ethiopia not too long ago. I looked as it's rarely mentioned anywhere, and just seemed like somewhere different. The list of indigenous species there is fantastic, you can hunt a lot more native species there than I ever would have guessed. But the costs are prohibitive, as an example a hunt for a single large spiral horn species would be over £20,000 and could easily end up double that. By contrast Safari Hunter on here has a 14 animal cull hunt over 8 days and 7 nights for £1950. Now, I know I'm comparing apples to oranges which is completely unfair on the Ethiopian outfitters, but with that kind of value to be had in RSA it's no wonder why it's popular.

I'd still love to hunt Ethiopia though........ :D
 

Safari Hunter

Well-Known Member
Guy's

Namibia is fenced and operate basically the same as the Kruger National Park! It is bigger area's...but still fenced. Namibia has 1st of all a low 'field carrying capacity' as what SA has, that is why their area's / farms are bigger than some of S.A's. But be assured that S.A has all the nescessary equipment for any Local / International hunter to have a hunt of a life time...

Face it guy's where in Africa you going to get 'free roaming' animals anymore...Botswana is closing down, Zambia is closed for 5 years...Private land looks like the way out...don't know, would like your opinion!

Totally agree with this. If you want free roaming indigenous species only in the Esatern Cape you can also only hunt them in June and July.
Cheers
Adrian
 
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