Stalking Sticks; high end or hazel from the hedge...

Devon Stalker

Well-Known Member
Ok, so I’ve always used a couple of hazel sticks from my local hedge to support my stalking rifle and this seems to have worked well for a few years. So my questions is for those of you who have made the transition from hazel to high end (by that I mean any manufactured sticks that for some reason cost >£100...!).

what’s the verdict, is high end worth it or do you reminisce about the natural sustainability of a bit of old bush...?
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Ok, so I’ve always used a couple of hazel sticks from my local hedge to support my stalking rifle and this seems to have worked well for a few years. So my questions is for those of you who have made the transition from hazel to high end (by that I mean any manufactured sticks that for some reason cost >£100...!).

what’s the verdict, is high end worth it or do you reminisce about the natural sustainability of a bit of old bush...?
B & Q poles will match the high end stuff all day long....I use hazel for marsh hide net poles.
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
I have tried all sorts of sticks from cheap (free) thumb sticks to various bi tri quad sticks. I have also seen various complaints about all the more complicated adjustable ones. Seizing legs and other things going wrong.
I have a set I made that are similar to the Limulus ones but I have different arrangement for limiting the leg spread. They are solid don’t whistle or clank if knocked, just a wooden (natural) sound.
KISS. If it makes you feel better you could always stick a Blaser sticker on them:coat:
 

Sheamus

Well-Known Member
I used double hazel sticks for best part of sixteen years. Four seasons ago I made myself a B&Q four stick model using rubber inner tube joints.
Practised in the back garden mounting the gun on them during the close season until id got a good technique going. Never picked the hazel sticks up since.
A shooting associate of mine uses viperflex and I must admit there very good giving a solid platform.
Never been tempted to buy a set though..
 

Rhodesianjess

Well-Known Member
Homemade Limulus style sticks also forester style, single that splits into two with v-rest at the top.
Never found the need to spend loads, mine work fine for what I do.
 

Oh6

Well-Known Member
Ok, so I’ve always used a couple of hazel sticks from my local hedge to support my stalking rifle and this seems to have worked well for a few years. So my questions is for those of you who have made the transition from hazel to high end... ..what’s the verdict, is high end worth it
Are you thinking to stay with twin sticks, or try 3, 4 or even 5 legged sticks?

Generally the brought sticks offer the ability to pan/track your quarry, height adjustment which can be useful (either for shooting or packing), and the more expensive you go, the lighter they get.

If considering quad sticks, then definitely try making a set of Monkey Sticks (Monkey Sticks !! ) to see whether you get on with the concept before spending any serious money.

I use either high end twin or quad sticks most of the time.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Hazel. No question.

I am the worst kind of tackle tart, and find it very hard not to get taken in and buy any amount of gear.

But for sticks, the difference between a set made from hazel wands and paracord and a manufactured set costing hundreds is so utterly marginal that it really isn’t worth it.
 

ndt man

Well-Known Member
Have you seen someone with the fancy sticks .. by the time they have fiddled around to get the correct hight the seasons over or the deers gone...
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
what’s the verdict, is high end worth it or do you reminisce about the natural sustainability of a bit of old bush...?
I have gone from single thumbstick, to twinsticks, to Bogpod tripod, then some bits of tube and bicycle inner tube DIY quad sticks, and then onto Limulus wooden quad sticks and ended up giving myself a first lockdown treat of Mk1 Blaser quad sticks...they all have advantages and disadvantages whether on functionality or versatility or cost.

You know the type of stalking you do best so you will be the best person to decide...closer range snap shots or waiting in a hedge to ambush...

Quad sticks give you the steadiest support, but are slower to deploy.

The Limulus sticks I have stalked with the most, and they are very good as a steadying staff when traversing obstacles like streams and ditches, and have the natural wood clack if you whack them against a tree inadvertently.

The Blaser carbon quad sticks are far and away the best shooting platform....they have the revolving front yoke which makes for very positive control of fine scale tracking / windage. I don't trust them as much as Limulus' solid wood for a walking staff...and they need a bit of DIY bicycle inner tube technology around one of the aluminium feet to prevent any rattle or clack from inadvertent tree whacking. The dull clack of the carbon is not dissimilar to wood however and has even less sharp a crack.

The Blaser quads and the Bogpod telescope pack a bit smaller for transport...but I managed to carry the full length Limulus sticks and you have apparently coped with the twin sticks, so probably not an issue.

As to whether their advantages are worth it cost wise, only you can say...can you happily zero from your hedge row sticks? If so, it is not worth changing for that reason.

If you are going to carry anything around with you it may as well be the most useful you can afford...or rather the one you can't afford to be without.

The best bet is try as many types as you can, but it could well get expensive if you go for best platform.

Alan
 
Last edited:

StephenToast

Well-Known Member
I made some quad sticks from garden canes. They were fine, very stable etc. Unfortunately they just weren't strong enough to support the weight of my pickup when I reversed over them about a fortnight after making them.

I have my doubts even Blaser sticks could support a 4x4 though.

Happily, they only cost about a fiver to make so I made a new set. I haven't managed to bend these ones and I have had them for a couple of years. Shot quite a few deer, rabbits, hares, foxes etc etc using them as a support and even use them for zeroing from.

Not sure how paying £100 for a pair would really improve on them?
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
There is a reason that Vipers are sold out in lots of places and there are no 5th legs available anywhere.
Another vote for Vipers, light fast to deploy use them as twins or quads, act as a support when going up/down difficult ground and have good wide tracking front end, only downside not cheap
 

Happy stalker

Well-Known Member
B&Q canes make really good stable quad sticks and they are cheap, only downside I have found is the lack of any lateral movement if in tall vegetation as the stick can become tangled making any movement difficult, having some lateral movement for fine adjustment is a definite plus, so I bought the cheapest set I could find and very happy with them.
 

Pete1774

Well-Known Member
I too have tried various sticks, mostly cheap, and eventually came to the conclusion that its more about taking the time to learn to use sticks rather than looking for an instant solution. I spend a lot of time shooting targets off sticks with a 17HMR. I figured this made sense because the vast majority of my hunting is off sticks. An expensive rifle doesn't make you a better shot without practice and neither will expensive sticks.
 
Top