Tempted by the Primos Trigger stick bipod and 2 point gun rest

Guesty

Well-Known Member
#1
Has anyone used the Primos tripod and gun rest set up?
Is it any good, or does it have any drawbacks to consider?
Finally, does anyone know where it can be picked up for the best price?
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#2
I have the tripod, but not the rest. Very stable and versatile sticks. I don't have any worthwhile criticisms of them, really
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
#3
As previously posted on here I was a great fan of the tripod trigger stick, so went and purchased the gun rest. Unfortunately I found the link between rest and tripod was too flimsy to hold a loaded rifle with all the bells and whistles in a rigid manner. No matter, as the tripod seemed to be a good bit of kit until ... the clutch mechanism started to play up on two of the legs. They stopped deploying as they should and if assisted by hand made a God-awful grinding noise. I stripped them down and found that crud in the clutch cams was causing the problem. Cleaned everything up and things were fine for a bit and then the problem recurred, with ever stronger pulls on the trigger completely failing to release the clutches. Another strip and clean revealed that hard pulling had worn the heads of the operating rods into the plastic housing so there was insufficient length of pull to release the clutch.
They are really good bits of mechanical engineering that do a great job of providing a traversable rifle/camera support that readily adapts to varied shooting heights and uneven terrain. Sadly the fabrication and materials aren't up to the job. My sticks didn't get abused or hammered over harsh terrain - my stalking is a leisurely stroll about lowland hedges and woods. If they can make a set that keeps the crud out of the clutch mechanism and beef up some of the plastic to metal bearing surfaces I'd certainly buy them again. Until they bring out that sort of upgrade I'd give them a miss.
 

Guesty

Well-Known Member
#4
That's great info thanks very much.
I am considering them for NV foxing where I would hopefully be able to leave the rifle mounted in position (lashed onto the rest?), so I could be free to scan about. The rifle is a modded heavy barrelled varnint with another 3lb of NV on top, so maybe the Primos won't be up to the strain?
I was also hoping they might stand a bit of rough abuse being clattered about in practical comps such as the RBL Precision with a heavy 308 but they might be too fragile.
 

Cris

Well-Known Member
#5
Had a guy out with me. Before we set off one of the legs wouldn't lock. He ended up using my sticks instead.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
#6
I got a set of the tripod sticks recently and I must say I really like them so far. I dont know how they hold up to bad weather and lots of mud over time but thus far they are quiet and very stable.

I'm quite tall so I usually just extend them to full length but bound together prior to getting into the field so I can use them as bino rests, and then just alter leg length slightly with the trigger if I need to once I split the legs out into tripod format. Seems to work well and avoids lots of time spent retracting and extending the legs on the stalk.

If I find these dont hold up then I'll probably move to a fixed leg format but keep the tripod style as I find that is very stable.
 

Essex stalker

Well-Known Member
#7
I have a set with the gun rest, they have there uses and being able to deploy and adjust the height single handed is great, however I don't find them anywhere near as stable as a set of quadsticks. There are really good for bunny bashing at night when distances tend to be less
 

tedsalad

Well-Known Member
#9
I have the rifle rest and tripod. First set of sticks fused after half dozen outings. Kindly replaced FOC by Bushware in Stirling. Very careful with the new set. I agree there are design faults including requiring your best efforts with your Dremel to get in and clean them.

I like the fact you can set your rifle up in position and then glass around. I do this a lot, takes a bit of getting used to as initially it feels quite flimsy but in practice strong enough -so far!
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
#10
I was out foxoing with Paddy and Paul last week and we had a big discussion on this. They use the Vanguard 3 legged shooting stick, these guys are out 5 days/night a week and have tried everything on the market so judge for yourself.

D
 

JohnT

Well-Known Member
#12
If I have this totally wrong it is through lack of experience, but surely if you are out night foxing the sticks would be set up most of the time whilst scanning? If that is so and the Primos version is of questionable strength/stability why not investigate the five legged variety ?
If my understanding is correct they should/will allow the rifle to be set up and left independent. Yes, I do know that traversing quad or five legged sticks is more difficult than the Primos set-up, but surely worth consideration for convenience?
As I said, I am inexperienced in the use of these but have been told by those that use them that quad sticks are very quick to deploy once you have some practice and the fifth leg takes no time at all once set.
If what you are after is a set-up that leaves the rifle securely deployed and then fine tune for the shot, to my way of thinking the five leg variety should let you do that. Indeed the fifth leg could become redundant at the time of shooting and the sticks used as if they were simply quads. Or is that too much faffing about?
 

Ferryman

Well-Known Member
#13
If you want to setup and not worry I have this setup
Lone Star Field Products

Originally purchased for long range target shooting, not cheap but extremely well made.
It is not light weight but if you are able to get a vehicle close to where you want to shoot from it is ideal.
I may try and modify it into a vehicle mount.
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
#14
That's great info thanks very much.
I am considering them for NV foxing where I would hopefully be able to leave the rifle mounted in position (lashed onto the rest?), so I could be free to scan about. The rifle is a modded heavy barrelled varnint with another 3lb of NV on top, so maybe the Primos won't be up to the strain?
I was also hoping they might stand a bit of rough abuse being clattered about in practical comps such as the RBL Precision with a heavy 308 but they might be too fragile.
The sticks will handle the weight but the friction rotation in the z direction on the 2 point gun rest will not support a heavy barrel gun plus a heavy night vision setup. It is best suited to a light gun and light scope setup.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
#16
You are correct Paddy et al shoot most of their foxs by calling so they set out the caller and have the rifle on the sticks and in the shoulder while they scan with the thermal. This is because the foxs come in v quickly often from dead ground so the shot need to be taken very quickly. Thats why they use vanguards.

I do little calling but of late has been very productive ( 7 foxs in 2 eves) and I wait with my rifle in position on quad sticks if I am standing out otherwise rifle is on bipod on roof of truck.

Often as not on my ground we can see the fox come in for a hundred+ yds so much easier.

D
 

Triumph_Dave

Well-Known Member
#17
As previously posted on here I was a great fan of the tripod trigger stick, so went and purchased the gun rest. Unfortunately I found the link between rest and tripod was too flimsy to hold a loaded rifle with all the bells and whistles in a rigid manner. No matter, as the tripod seemed to be a good bit of kit until ... the clutch mechanism started to play up on two of the legs. They stopped deploying as they should and if assisted by hand made a God-awful grinding noise. I stripped them down and found that crud in the clutch cams was causing the problem. Cleaned everything up and things were fine for a bit and then the problem recurred, with ever stronger pulls on the trigger completely failing to release the clutches. Another strip and clean revealed that hard pulling had worn the heads of the operating rods into the plastic housing so there was insufficient length of pull to release the clutch.
They are really good bits of mechanical engineering that do a great job of providing a traversable rifle/camera support that readily adapts to varied shooting heights and uneven terrain. Sadly the fabrication and materials aren't up to the job. My sticks didn't get abused or hammered over harsh terrain - my stalking is a leisurely stroll about lowland hedges and woods. If they can make a set that keeps the crud out of the clutch mechanism and beef up some of the plastic to metal bearing surfaces I'd certainly buy them again. Until they bring out that sort of upgrade I'd give them a miss.
Just out of interest, what is the procedure to strip the sticks down?. I thought they were sealed units.. My question is if easy to strip might be worth taking them to bits and cleaning them before they fail.
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
#18
Just out of interest, what is the procedure to strip the sticks down?. I thought they were sealed units.
Yes they are and the manufacturer/importer states that there are no user serviceable parts involved... However, the 'procedure' is to get thoroughly ticked off with squeaky legs, then:

a. Apply high pressure washer in an effort to hose the crud out of the sticks.
b. Whirl said sticks about head in an effort to remove moisture.
c. Watch single lower leg detach itself from tripod assembly and disappear over garden hedge...
d. *******!!!
e. Retrieve leg and examine exposed clutch assembly.
f. Have light bulb moment thinking "Oh, so that's how it works...."
g. Proceed to shed with bits of trigger stick, open tool box and disassemble, starting with the bottom retaining plate under the trigger.

The lower legs are a twist/push fit with some sort of adhesive which clearly has little resistance to centrifugal force. Once they're off and the plate below the tripod head is removed it's obvious how the whole thing is put together. I'm a mechanical muppet and even I could work it out...

Disclaimer: Disassembly of Trigger sticks is entirely at your own risk. The author of this post accepts no liability for any half-baked amateur efforts resulting in broken windows, spearing the neighbour's moggy or any other damage ...
 

rainman_l

Well-Known Member
#19
I have recent purchased the sticks and found them easy and quick to use, light but not flimbsy to carry just added some para chord to have them over my shoulder
 

Triumph_Dave

Well-Known Member
#20
Yes they are and the manufacturer/importer states that there are no user serviceable parts involved... However, the 'procedure' is to get thoroughly ticked off with squeaky legs, then:

a. Apply high pressure washer in an effort to hose the crud out of the sticks.
b. Whirl said sticks about head in an effort to remove moisture.
c. Watch single lower leg detach itself from tripod assembly and disappear over garden hedge...
d. *******!!!
e. Retrieve leg and examine exposed clutch assembly.
f. Have light bulb moment thinking "Oh, so that's how it works...."
g. Proceed to shed with bits of trigger stick, open tool box and disassemble, starting with the bottom retaining plate under the trigger.

The lower legs are a twist/push fit with some sort of adhesive which clearly has little resistance to centrifugal force. Once they're off and the plate below the tripod head is removed it's obvious how the whole thing is put together. I'm a mechanical muppet and even I could work it out...

Disclaimer: Disassembly of Trigger sticks is entirely at your own risk. The author of this post accepts no liability for any half-baked amateur efforts resulting in broken windows, spearing the neighbour's moggy or any other damage ...
Brilliant!! as a Mech Eng I reckon I can follow that procedure :).. My pair have been very good and used a fair amount, but have tried to keep them clean as much as possible.. Just recently though there are signs that they are starting to stick, so a bit of maintenance looks to be called for.. I also use the Viper flex quad sticks supplied by Hammond sporting, very good sticks and well made, but a few design flaws ref noise, 1. the adjustment holes whistle in wind, sorted by taping them up as its the lightest option. 2. The top rests are too hard and dent wood stocks. Sorted by taping pipe insulation foam over them. 3. The legs are aluminium, which is good, but very "clickey" saw a clone set at the Game Fair that had soft foam on the leg at various lengths and that does seem to stop the legs being able to click against each other, so that is the next fix. A combination of the Primos tripod and the Viper flex quad sticks covers nearly all my shooting needs. Of note I also purchased the Primos bipod trigger sticks and now do not use them.. way too much variable flex for me, even with the top clamp bolts tightened.
 

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