Tennis elbow in right elbow. Any tips?

Hayduke

Well-Known Member
What is your level of fitness?
No offense but unless you’re a really big ole unfit knacker lifting rifle on to sticks a few times during a hunt shouldn’t do that.
But you could have been really unlucky.
Or raising it many hundreds of times and running a 5k with it over your head 🤣

Tendons are a bvgger, they need A LOT of rest (often more time than broken bones take to heal).
You could also tape it once it is recovered (or at least well on the way there). Plenty of vids online on sports taping tennis elbow.

Also consider technique. I carry rifle upside down hung off sling. With the business end pointing at about 20 degrees angle below horizontal at the dirt. I find this way I can deploy it by holding stock around the magazine area and lifting more at the centre of balance. Might be slightly harder to do with quad sticks. But certainly no need to lift the weight of the thing by the pistol grip.
ATB tendons can be a nuisance
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I have it from time to time. When I had it badly went to physio and had accuputure and he spcified specific exercises. Foerarm on table with wrist/hand over edge and had to raise weigh in hand up and down I used a 2 kg dumbell. Cured the problem. I do get it from tennis when over extending when trying to serve too hard. In that case I wear a neoprene elbow support. Mine came from Sports Direct but masses on Ebay. They are very good.

D
 

Norfolk Horn

Well-Known Member
Try acupuncture it worked for a mate of mine who was a medic and tried all the modern medicine.
I recently had policeman's heal and nothing was helping so went and she my nice Chinese lady who I have seen before for other problems. Three visits later I'm back walking my dogs again with just a minor amount of discomfort.
Money well spent.
 

Girl_with_a_gun

Well-Known Member
Hi All. Hopefully we've got a bit better at describing these problems than some of the "old school" and really unpleasant sounding descriptions above!

Firstly, it's important to check it really is tennis elbow (healthcare professionals call it lateral epicondylitis or more frequently now Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy (LET)). LET is where the muscles that help with gripping, extending the wrist and turning the forearm all converge onto one tendon (the bit that joins a muscle to a bone) which gets asked to do more work than it has capacity for at that time and becomes irritated. It can be a sudden overwhelming event or a combination of smaller things. Other conditions can bring on elbow pain such as referred pain from your neck and shoulder, so it's worth getting a check over and making sure nothing else is going on.

LET pain can come on from daft things like holding your wrist up on a mouse, gripping dog leads on a long walk, pull-ups, wringing out cloths or as in this case, putting up a rifle. Or more likely, it can come from a combination of many things that serve together to overwhelm the tendon tissue. I'm seeing a lot of these after people have been COVID isolated or doing more working from home on unsuitable tech/table combos. 2 weeks not doing much in the house allows us to lose some fitness and strength so what would have been normal activity is then a big step-up. After the first lockdown, many people haven't regained the fitness they lost with the enforced lack of activity. Kitchen tables are higher than desks and chairs lower than work chairs, so hands on a laptop can then be in a position that makes these muscles have to work differently.

If it's a new pain, then a short period of relative rest (doesn't mean sitting on the sofa watching Netflix all day) can settle the symptoms then a slow build up of the activity again. Perhaps think about the analogy of the difference between running for a bus and running a marathon - both activities are running, but if you have only done the first then the second is likely to make you very sore. In reality, we would aim to slowly progress the running until we were fit enough. The same goes with gripping/twisting/lifting movements in the case of LET - building that fitness in a progressive manner.

Often, the pain will go away all on its own, if you minimise the aggravating activities and build back into them slowly. Sometimes you might need to get some help.

"Physio" means many different things to different people. Generally, a slow build up of work in the muscles that pull on that tendon is the most evidence-based. Other things mentioned here tend to be adjuncts and can help with pain relief whilst the hard work is being done. I haven't ever had to send anyone to surgery (including myself: just because you're supposed to know what you're doing doesn't mean you're not a dick sometimes:lol:). I rarely use CSIs these days but, if the strengthening work doesn't help, ESWT (extracorporeal shock wave therapy - a machine that puts pulses through the tendon) is the next level treatment and can have good results. All these treatments still generally require some muscle work afterwards otherwise the problem is likely to recur.

It's a field that is changing and progressing all the time, so if you're getting help, do ask your healthcare provider how up to date they are. Here's a very recent summary of the current evidence for exercise versus passive treatment with or without invasive treatments to help prompt discussions: Exercise interventions in lateral elbow tendinopathy have better outcomes than passive interventions, but the effects are small: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 2123 subjects in 30 trials | British Journal of Sports Medicine

Finally - good luck. It's a pain, especially for those of us with jobs that mean you can't just stop the aggravating activity and I feel for all of you having been there.
 

gr cz527

Well-Known Member
i have had the same issues, i put it down to fishing,shooting, chainsaws banging the protruding bone frequently didnt help. i got a steroid injection which helped but wore off after 9 months. i then bought a ultrasonic machine which coupled with deep tissue massages really helped me. i now have a deep tissue gun which i use each day and have full use with no pain.

good luck and i feel your pain!
 
Hi All. Hopefully we've got a bit better at describing these problems than some of the "old school" and really unpleasant sounding descriptions above!

Firstly, it's important to check it really is tennis elbow (healthcare professionals call it lateral epicondylitis or more frequently now Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy (LET)). LET is where the muscles that help with gripping, extending the wrist and turning the forearm all converge onto one tendon (the bit that joins a muscle to a bone) which gets asked to do more work than it has capacity for at that time and becomes irritated. It can be a sudden overwhelming event or a combination of smaller things. Other conditions can bring on elbow pain such as referred pain from your neck and shoulder, so it's worth getting a check over and making sure nothing else is going on.

LET pain can come on from daft things like holding your wrist up on a mouse, gripping dog leads on a long walk, pull-ups, wringing out cloths or as in this case, putting up a rifle. Or more likely, it can come from a combination of many things that serve together to overwhelm the tendon tissue. I'm seeing a lot of these after people have been COVID isolated or doing more working from home on unsuitable tech/table combos. 2 weeks not doing much in the house allows us to lose some fitness and strength so what would have been normal activity is then a big step-up. After the first lockdown, many people haven't regained the fitness they lost with the enforced lack of activity. Kitchen tables are higher than desks and chairs lower than work chairs, so hands on a laptop can then be in a position that makes these muscles have to work differently.

If it's a new pain, then a short period of relative rest (doesn't mean sitting on the sofa watching Netflix all day) can settle the symptoms then a slow build up of the activity again. Perhaps think about the analogy of the difference between running for a bus and running a marathon - both activities are running, but if you have only done the first then the second is likely to make you very sore. In reality, we would aim to slowly progress the running until we were fit enough. The same goes with gripping/twisting/lifting movements in the case of LET - building that fitness in a progressive manner.

Often, the pain will go away all on its own, if you minimise the aggravating activities and build back into them slowly. Sometimes you might need to get some help.

"Physio" means many different things to different people. Generally, a slow build up of work in the muscles that pull on that tendon is the most evidence-based. Other things mentioned here tend to be adjuncts and can help with pain relief whilst the hard work is being done. I haven't ever had to send anyone to surgery (including myself: just because you're supposed to know what you're doing doesn't mean you're not a dick sometimes:lol:). I rarely use CSIs these days but, if the strengthening work doesn't help, ESWT (extracorporeal shock wave therapy - a machine that puts pulses through the tendon) is the next level treatment and can have good results. All these treatments still generally require some muscle work afterwards otherwise the problem is likely to recur.

It's a field that is changing and progressing all the time, so if you're getting help, do ask your healthcare provider how up to date they are. Here's a very recent summary of the current evidence for exercise versus passive treatment with or without invasive treatments to help prompt discussions: Exercise interventions in lateral elbow tendinopathy have better outcomes than passive interventions, but the effects are small: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 2123 subjects in 30 trials | British Journal of Sports Medicine

Finally - good luck. It's a pain, especially for those of us with jobs that mean you can't just stop the aggravating activity and I feel for all of you having been there.

Better summary and more up to date than mine 👍
 

phillips321

Well-Known Member
i have had the same issues, i put it down to fishing,shooting, chainsaws banging the protruding bone frequently didnt help. i got a steroid injection which helped but wore off after 9 months. i then bought a ultrasonic machine which coupled with deep tissue massages really helped me. i now have a deep tissue gun which i use each day and have full use with no pain.

good luck and i feel your pain!
Any chance of links to the ultrasonic machine and tissue massage gun please. I’m willing to try anything before going under the knife.
 

gr cz527

Well-Known Member

jim.waggy

Active Member
Been weight lifting for 25 years ..and i will tell you it will only go away if you stop doing what caused it... and recovery time depends on the age and supplement you take for the muscle and joints, nothing will help apart from anti inflamotory meds.. time will heal it.. very slow recovery to be honest!
 

Ratel

Well-Known Member
Had it through splitting logs, or don't split first time, lift and bang down again with log still attached. I wore a brace, leather band at wrist and elbow with steel bar between. Just rest and that brace, but it took six months to lose pain.
 

GWP

Well-Known Member
I used a gell called traxam on mine small pea sized amount twice a day for a week eased it sorted when i retired :)
 

paulbshooting

Well-Known Member
Acupuncture sorted me. Had lots of physio and tried those supports but no improvement until Acupuncture was suggested. It was a first for me and I positively reacted. 3 sessions later and fully sorted.
 

nick.308

Well-Known Member
as others have said make sure it is tennis elbow first. Have you had any scans yet? You mentioned a planned MRI. If its been going on 6 months I would have thought it to be wise to at least get a scan to make sure there are no abnormalities in your bone. Get advice from the professionals.
 

ivorgun2

Well-Known Member
Hi do know what cause your tennis elbow ?? if you do then tell the neuromuscular therapist to treat it !!!
 
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