Terminology

Border

Well-Known Member
Heads have been discussed several times but another one that is frequently abused is calibre.
Is the 243 Winchester a calibre or a cartridge?
Discuss :D
 
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reloader54

Well-Known Member
Heads have ben discussed several times but another one that is frequently abused is calibre.
Is the 243 Winchester a calibre or a cartridge?
Discuss :D

I have a Parker Hale 1200 deluxe, its 243 Winchester calibre, therefore it requires 243 cartridges, they can be manufactured by winchester,remington,ppu,lapua,norma,sako,federal, ect,ect, or me using any of the aforementioned brass in addition to a wide selection of powders,[at the moment anyway]

whats your opinion?? you seem to have avoided stating it in your question.

and who is ben??:D
 

L1A1

Well-Known Member
It is a specific cartridge designed for a particular chambering.
.270" is a caliber but .270 win is not the same as .270 WSM as .17 HMR is not the same as .17 Fireball, same caliber but different chambering.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
The early couple of posts are IMHO incorrect.

240 Weatherby, 243 WCF, are both cartridges. Their calibre is 6mm. Thus the 6mm Remington (formerly 244 Remington) and the wildcat 6mm-06.

If I wanted to build a bespoke rifle for those cartridges I'd order a 6mm barrel and then chamber it accordingly.

So if you reference a rifle I'd argue it is better described as being "chambered for 243 WCF" to be pedantic.

In reality what you call a thing doesn't matter as long as those involved in matter understand each other. To someone in an airport a 'plane (unless it the resident carpenter doing maintenance) is understood by all well enough.

So if I tell my FEO I want a rifle in "243 WCF calibre" that's good enough and less clumsy that asking for a 6mm calibre rifle "chambered in 243 WCF" .

L1A1 is spot on. Elsewise life' s too short, the weather's too hot and I'm off.
 
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NigelM

Well-Known Member
I might be wrong, but the way I have always used the terminology...

Calibre - is the bore size of the barrel. .243, .264, .284, .308 etc. Calibre is not specific to any design of cartridge.

Chambering - a 6.5mm/264 barrel can be chambered for 6.5 Swede, 6.5 Lapua, 6.5 Creedmoor etc.

Cartridge - the loaded brass that fits the chamber in your barrel.

So I have a .308 calibre barrel, chambered in 300 Win Mag which shoots 300 Win Mag cartridges.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
If you could and wanted to build a 25.4 /1" case necked down to 0.23622047 "/ 6mm , it still would be 6mm so its the I/D tube size that denotes Calibre not the case . be a nice spud gun .
 

Border

Well-Known Member
I have a Parker Hale 1200 deluxe, its 243 Winchester calibre, therefore it requires 243 cartridges, they can be manufactured by winchester,remington,ppu,lapua,norma,sako,federal, ect,ect, or me using any of the aforementioned brass in addition to a wide selection of powders,[at the moment anyway]

whats your opinion?? you seem to have avoided stating it in your question.

and who is ben??:D

My opinion is that it is a cartridge.
6mm/ .243" calibre.
 

Border

Well-Known Member
I might be wrong, but the way I have always used the terminology...

Calibre - is the bore size of the barrel. .243, .264, .284, .308 etc. Calibre is not specific to any design of cartridge.

Chambering - a 6.5mm/264 barrel can be chambered for 6.5 Swede, 6.5 Lapua, 6.5 Creedmoor etc.

Cartridge - the loaded brass that fits the chamber in your barrel.

So I have a .308 calibre barrel, chambered in 300 Win Mag which shoots 300 Win Mag cartridges.

Spot on :)
 

Whitebeard

Well-Known Member
The problem with 243 is it is both the name for a commercial cartridge and a calibre, hence the confusion, bullet diametre is a genuine 0,243" or 6,17mm.

Ian.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
The problem with 243 is it is both the name for a commercial cartridge and a calibre, hence the confusion, bullet diametre is a genuine 0,243" or 6,17mm.

Ian.

It's just us being lazy Ian. Rules still apply, the calibre is .243", the chambering is in 243 Winchester. You wouldn't want to get it confused with a 243 Win AI or a 243 WSM would you.
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
It's just us being lazy Ian. Rules still apply, the calibre is .243", the chambering is in 243 Winchester. You wouldn't want to get it confused with a 243 Win AI or a 243 WSM would you.

The difference is hole in a piece of paper can be measured, but not the one taking the foxes shoulder off....
What say you Nigel?

When your birds comming? How's you cover strip?

Tim.243
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
The difference is hole in a piece of paper can be measured, but not the one taking the foxes shoulder off....
What say you Nigel?

When your birds comming? How's you cover strip?

Tim.243

It's terminology Tim, not the real world but important to get right to avoid confusion.

Birds coming end July I hope, all really for them now but it's a bit early. We don't shoot until November so plenty of time. Maize is looking surprisingly good but the rest of the covers are desperate for a drink. Fingers crossed this high will bu**er off very shortly or the mustard will have to come out.
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
It's terminology Tim, not the real world but important to get right to avoid confusion.

Birds coming end July I hope, all really for them now but it's a bit early. We don't shoot until November so plenty of time. Maize is looking surprisingly good but the rest of the covers are desperate for a drink. Fingers crossed this high will bu**er off very shortly or the mustard will have to come out.

One long bit of mine is ok ish, got the brown mustard and power harrow lined up lol

Big change over here so you will have to come and look see....

Tim.243
 

Swedish

Well-Known Member
To be pedantic, not quite spot on.
A cartridge is a metal, paper or plastic container without a projectile.
A round consists of the propelling charge, primer, cartridge case and projectile(s).
;)
Historically you are quite correct.
However, being even more pedantic the terms 'cartridge' and 'round' have been regarded as interchangeable for many decades since the evolution of self contained ammunition. The container part is now usually referred to as a 'cartridge case'. Thankfully though a bullet has remained a bullet as opposed to a 'head':popcorn::D
 
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BryanDC

Well-Known Member
Historically you are quite correct.
However, being even more pedantic the terms 'cartridge' and 'round' have been regarded as interchangeable for many decades since the evolution of self contained ammunition. The container part is now usually referred to as a 'cartridge case'. Thankfully though a bullet has remained a bullet as opposed to a 'head':popcorn::D

I'm not sure he is historically correct. The first integrated cartridges were developed in the 1800s consisting of a base with primer, a brass or paper casing and a bullet. Earlier types of "cartridge" consisted of a paper tube filled with powder and a ball at one end. The base was ripped open and the powder poured down the muzzle with the ball being rammed home using the paper as a wad. later types included a paper "cartridge" with an incorporated ball and a built in primer that was breach loaded.

On the other hand a round can be fired from a musket that has been loaded from a powder flask. Does that mean a bullet can also be called a round. :stir:
 
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