The 28mm of rain snuffed the fire here.

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
I went up the back today and walked up onto a flat spur and shot a short bit of video. In doing so I noticed a hot spot still smoking.
Believe it or not it wont surprise me one iota if that same tree regenerates.

 

Ratwhiskers

Well-Known Member
Glad to see the pressure's of John.

As you say, a lot of Oz's made of tough stuff and will regenerate soon enough.
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
I went up the back today and walked up onto a flat spur and shot a short bit of video. In doing so I noticed a hot spot still smoking.
Believe it or not it wont surprise me one iota if that same tree regenerates.

I've been clearing scrub off chalk grassland for the last few weeks. Had some big brush piles to burn. Several fires were built on top of hazel and spindle stools. They've burnt to the ground but I'll lay money there'll be shoots from those root stocks in the spring. Spindle, like eucalyptus, is practically immortal.
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
If it's anything like the eucalyptus in my neighbours garden it will regenerate. They've been trying for years to get rid of it and no matter what they throw at it, it always comes back! Probably the most resilient tree I've come across.
Glad it looks as if the worst is over for youy, must be worrying times.
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
I dont know what spindle is Finchy.
Euonymous Europaeus - European Spindle tree:

1575377597426.png1575379646854.png View attachment 142814

So-called because for centuries the stiff, straight and smooth new season growth shoots have been used to make spindles for spinning yarn with a bobbin.
Extremely hardy and readily spread by birds, spindle is very common throughout the UK in hedgerows, scrubland and woodland margins.
Work with it frequently when hedge laying. Somewhat brittle and inflexible and a bit unforgiving, it's nevertheless a great hedgerow species because when cut regrowth is usually phenomenal.

In late spring it is often seen completely festooned in the silk cocoons of the ermine moth caterpillar. They strip it to the bone and it looks dead afterwards by always bounces back with vigour.1575379099981.png
 
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johngryphon

Well-Known Member
Thank you,its one I had never heard of,I have seen trees here festooned in a similar way by some sort of caterpillar here also.
Old Keeper things are pretty right here atm as we havent had the very hot summer lead up to make it 'bad" well not around here that is.
 

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