The New Normal Pup Price

CDSG Shooting Sports

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
I know this has been done to death in a reactive or retrospective manner but, looking forward, what do you think the average price range will be for well-bred pups for the next couple of years? Some rationale for your answer would be welcome too.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Money has lost value, not only the £.

Unfortunately dogs have become a commodity for sellers and accessory for the buyers.

Sadly for the dog, they can't be left to harmlessly gather dust like material things.

Late in life owner and home changes (or loss altogether) for the dog must be detrimental too.

£1k seems to be the going rate now...
 

James0586

Well-Known Member
It seems that a well bred working dog is worth a lot less than a mongrel! I have recently seen working /trialling labs go for a £1000 - £1500 as the “dog boys” won’t pay any more.
However a labradoodle will be a £2500 + dog all day long.
Worlds gone mad!
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Amazed at what price folk will put on the characteristic of not casting hair.
Then there's the ones that thought a working cocker was a good idea because they allegedly dont have many health issues and are clever..... They wonder why Fido is still bouncing even after they've taken it out for their daily jog.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
It's not really rocket science.

The recent lockdowns have seen lots of people stuck at home, with the only valid reasons to go out being to buy shopping or go for a daily walk. Being at home (so having the time to devote to a new puppy) and humans needing more interest on the walk is a great environment for a new dog and so the demand for dogs rocketed. Inevitably, the price of new dogs and the despicable thefts of dogs rocketed too. The great British public had to pay the inflated prices if they wanted to acquire their new lockdown playmate.

Slowly (and hopefully finally) the lockdown restrictions are now beginning to ease. Although I bet there will still be many who will not for a long time be happy cramming themselves into sports stadiums or queueing 6 deep at a trendy bar to get a drink. Open space exercise and walkies will still be popular. It will be a habit that has been created and will remain popular although it may wane somewhat over time.

What does this mean for dog prices then? Obviously conjecture on my part, but the market has shown that people will pay 4 figure sums for dogs. The market will shrink somewhat though. So I can see prices dropping, but I very much doubt that they will drop to anywhere near pre-covid prices.

The thing to do perhaps is acquire a dog or bitch and become friendly with others who have the same type of dog. You can then, in effect, pimp your dog. If you have a male, get the choice of pup as part of the deal and obviously if you have a bitch, keep one of the litter. You don't need to do this more than once or twice in the dog's life and of course you need to ideally choose the right mate and have everything above board. The result being, you only pay for a dog once and you have an avenue to get a puppy as the original dog gets older. And so on and on.
 

Lloyd90

Well-Known Member
It's not really rocket science.

The recent lockdowns have seen lots of people stuck at home, with the only valid reasons to go out being to buy shopping or go for a daily walk. Being at home (so having the time to devote to a new puppy) and humans needing more interest on the walk is a great environment for a new dog and so the demand for dogs rocketed. Inevitably, the price of new dogs and the despicable thefts of dogs rocketed too. The great British public had to pay the inflated prices if they wanted to acquire their new lockdown playmate.

Slowly (and hopefully finally) the lockdown restrictions are now beginning to ease. Although I bet there will still be many who will not for a long time be happy cramming themselves into sports stadiums or queueing 6 deep at a trendy bar to get a drink. Open space exercise and walkies will still be popular. It will be a habit that has been created and will remain popular although it may wane somewhat over time.

What does this mean for dog prices then? Obviously conjecture on my part, but the market has shown that people will pay 4 figure sums for dogs. The market will shrink somewhat though. So I can see prices dropping, but I very much doubt that they will drop to anywhere near pre-covid prices.

The thing to do perhaps is acquire a dog or bitch and become friendly with others who have the same type of dog. You can then, in effect, pimp your dog. If you have a male, get the choice of pup as part of the deal and obviously if you have a bitch, keep one of the litter. You don't need to do this more than once or twice in the dog's life and of course you need to ideally choose the right mate and have everything above board. The result being, you only pay for a dog once and you have an avenue to get a puppy as the original dog gets older. And so on and on.

Several people have made the claim that they are going to ask for pick of the litter in return for the stud fee.

Some have reported they are asking for the money but want the price of a pup for a stud fee.


To be blunt, anyone giving someone the pick of the litter or the price of a pup (around £2,000 now) for a stud fee must be lacking between the ears.


There are no end of very high quality stud dogs available, FTCH and open winners, for just a few hundred pounds.


Recently someone was on Facebook kicking up a right fuss because they have a triallers a pup for a stud fee, only for the trialler to think that their bitch weren’t all that and simply sold the pup for £1,500.
The bitch owner was crying about it, but that’s their own fault for agreeing to the deal.

It was pretty obvious a top trialler isn’t going to keep a pup that’s not out of top lines and comes from ‘just a shooting dog’ that they’ve never even seen work!

Kennel blindness is causing a lot of people to get caught up on the romance of breeding their dogs, a lot of which have faults and should not be bred from. The money involved has made it even worse than it was previously.



What we are seeing at the moment is the pet market driving demand. There’s a huge amount of posts on all forms of media constantly complaining about puppy prices.

Yet whilst many are sat complaining, others turn up, pay the money and leave with the pup. As long as that continues prices will remain high.

Over the next year it will be interesting to see how things turn out. Out of a load of trial lads we hardly know anyone with a pup they are bringing on themselves.
Although I know quite a few lads who bred litters and sold the entire litter because they couldn’t turn down the silly money being thrown at them.


My mate had a litter of 10 Springers, he sold 8 for £2,000 each and kept the best 2 which stood out by a mile.

Within a week someone had offered him £3,000 for one of them and he let it go. Another week later he had done the same with the other one. He wasn’t even advertising them. People just ringing him up and offering him stupid money and in the end he thought over the last few years he couldn’t usually even get £3,000 for a fully trained dog that he’s put 2+ years of time, training, food and lodge into.


If he hasn’t of had a single enquiry about his pups priced at £2,000 he would have soon dropped the price.


Imagine putting your car up for sale for £2,000 and you’ve got people phoning you up begging you to sell it to them and offering you £3,000?!?!
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
I must admit that last year really surprised me. I honestly thought that job security concerns would see prices drop and despite the convenience of working from home and bringing on a pup during that time, I am still surprised that so many everyday people have been stumping up £2k plus.

I think that average prices will drop but I can see them leveling out at £1000 - £1500. I am still of the opinion that we undervalue working dogs in comparison to what we will pay for a rifle, a telescopic sight, a 4 x 4, some even believe a pup should be cheaper than a quality hunting jacket or a pair of quality hunting boots!!

At the age of 18 I spent just over a weeks wages on a Lab pup.....fast forward 35 years and our latest pup has cost me just over a weeks wage.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
It’ll calm down fairly quickly, breeding animals is the ultimate Ponzi scheme, by July of this year the country should be awash with pups and people will be trickling back to work, so a double whammy for the breeders.
 

Shabz

Well-Known Member
Everything seems to be the same. You can’t find a Land Rover for less than £10k. I’ve been looking for a motorbike, just a couple hundred quid thing to have a play on and everything is either completely dismantled and in boxes or it’s £1000 minimum or both! Money just doesn’t seem to have the same value nowadays.
My last pup was £500 12 years ago and my newest was £1000 this year. Both roughly a weeks wage for me too. Only thing is, I’ve had five promotions in that time and the guy doing the job I was doing 12 years ago will be lucky if he’s making £600.
 

wildfowler.250

Well-Known Member
There are sensible dog people asking for sensible money. I’m in the midst of looking for a lab at the moment. I’ve seen these 2.5k prices and I’ve also seen people looking for £900-£1K . A grand is as much as I’d spend. But it’s crazy to think that you can generate 10-20k out of one litter. Fools and their money eh
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
The problem comes when you actually want a dog. You can sit around all day saying that the max you will pay is £X. However, if there are none of what you want available you have to either go without or agree to pay the going rate. Does it make the buyer the fool or the person stubbornly sticking to their valuation but with no dog?

I have been there and unfortunately had to pay the going rate because I 'needed' a dog and my team is getting older.

Personally I think the fool is the person who buys from a breeder who hasn't health checked the parents. That really is foolish and is like playing Russian Roulette with your money and encouraging people to breed puppies with health problems.

As for making all this money, well that could be argued too. If you have sold a litter for £20K you should be paying tax on it or you're obviously breaking the law. Registered puppies are easy to follow up on for the Tax inspector. Puppies are also hard work and you could lose you bitch and end up with nothing? Don't underestimate breeding puppies as simply turning a fast buck. Maybe puppies were far too cheap before?

I'm sorry but I just don't believe that there are trialling labs going for £1K or even £1500. I was offered a lab puppy from a trialling bitch for £2K and was told that that was the going rate. Now that world may do deals between each other for less but the fact that they can be sold to pet home for £2k will dictate where most of them go. Money talks. Always has done and always will do.
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
I must admit that last year really surprised me. I honestly thought that job security concerns would see prices drop and despite the convenience of working from home and bringing on a pup during that time, I am still surprised that so many everyday people have been stumping up £2k plus.

I think that average prices will drop but I can see them leveling out at £1000 - £1500. I am still of the opinion that we undervalue working dogs in comparison to what we will pay for a rifle, a telescopic sight, a 4 x 4, some even believe a pup should be cheaper than a quality hunting jacket or a pair of quality hunting boots!!

At the age of 18 I spent just over a weeks wages on a Lab pup.....fast forward 35 years and our latest pup has cost me just over a weeks wage.
I would say that sounds about right to me. A week's money for a dog sounds about right relative to my views on the value of money and what it should buy you.

I am not a dog owner. Love them to bits but I don't need one and don't need the hassle of being tied to something for such a long period.

Price wise though, one of the biggest issues that has caused prices to elevate so much is not just people wanting dogs due to furlough, free time, being at home etc but more their ability to actually pay the higher prices.

Look at the US M2 money supply for example. Serious amounts of dollars have been created the last 12 months and other western countries have followed suit to pay for the carnage that covid created.

The UK is no different. The support given to the public and to companies is staggering. Not sure about everyone else but I seem to have more money this year and I know I have been at work less and when I have been there, I have not been working as hard. I have not been stupid enough to spend money on stuff I don't need let alone on a 3 grand dog or some stupid amount like that.

The trouble with increasing money supply in an economy so much, is that it simply provides people more ammunition to buy stuff they don't necessarily need. People selling stuff then put their prices up. It is not just dogs.

Obviously inflation is on the skyline, if not already and normally interest rates would be raised to offset this but they will not be able to do that. It would crash the housing market and would cause ructions in state and commercial banking sectors due to all the IOU's that are in existence.

NO idea what will happen but a wise man will be diversified and have a few hedged bets and that does not include buying a dog unless it is absolutely necessary.

It will not just be people going back to work that stops high prices. It will be people not having the actual money to afford the asking price.
 

Coddy

Well-Known Member
It seems that a well bred working dog is worth a lot less than a mongrel! I have recently seen working /trialling labs go for a £1000 - £1500 as the “dog boys” won’t pay any more.
However a labradoodle will be a £2500 + dog all day long.
Worlds gone mad!

My Mrs was in a pet supply shop where she regularly goes.
Woman behind counter said to another customer in the shop ‘this woman (my wife) has a couple of working cockers’.
Customer ’oh thats nice, i have a Cockapoo’.
Wife: ‘Oh, a mongrel’.
Customer then huffed and walked out.

My wife was well chuffed. :thumb:
 

Kjf

Well-Known Member
My Mrs was in a pet supply shop where she regularly goes.
Woman behind counter said to another customer in the shop ‘this woman (my wife) has a couple of working cockers’.
Customer ’oh thats nice, i have a Cockapoo’.
Wife: ‘Oh, a mongrel’.
Customer then huffed and walked out.

My wife was well chuffed. :thumb:
Lol, I had this early last year , sat in the beer garden of the local

Bloke with a beagle type pup , asks wat breed are Mack was told him gwp X lab ,a mongrell

I asked him what his dog was ......... " a Very expensive beagapoo " ( in a loud / I'm important / smart arris voice , so all n sundry could hear )

I replied " so he's a mongrell like this idiot is then"

The bloke on the next table laughed his bollox off, n nearly fell off his chair lol

The idiot with the out of control mongrell , finished his pint sharpish and vacated the area , what a complete and utter tool lol lol

Kjf
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
I'm thinking about the same Dan, i reckon they'll slide back a bit once the pandemonium has passed but never go back to how they were so again like you say I'd imagine 1.5k will be the new normal for a pup.
I wonder if people will think that £1500 is actually a 'fair' price for a well-bred, well-reared pup or if they would still think it is overpriced but are 'forced' to pay it? As I have mentioned, considering what we are happy to pay for scopes, rifles, bins, 4x4's, coats, boots, etc I always feel that we undervalue the working dog.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
I would surmise that many of the people who have bought pups as a reaction to recent times have perhaps not realised the value of health checks in lineage. Going forward, again surmising, there's going to be a lot of dogs with health issues as a result of less than scrupulous breeding. Drawing a comparison between cars and dogs, it's not the cost of buying but the cost of running that becomes apparent, and a fair price paid for good health checks etc on a pup will pale into insignificance when considered against a dog with health issues requiring constant vet treatment.
If genuine dog breeders and working dog people say £1500 for a pup with all checks in place and lines, that's what a wise person pays. I'll likely speak to Dan next time I'm looking !
 
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