Thoughts on quad sticks?

simonl

Well-Known Member
I'm just about to give up making them - the green coated tube from B&Q is now so thin it's next to useless & they just don't last at all. They rust out or just snap.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
look at the ally tube it comes in at 3mt's it has better wall Thickness than the new bean sticks but still cheaper .may be worth a look :tiphat:
 

The Singing Stalker

Well-Known Member
Have you got time to spare? If so you can make them, or if you have money to burn you can buy them and they will, generally be better. Just don't shut the gate on them or drive over them or or or. I made my own a few years ago, they were fine and did the job, then I bought some because the closed down small as that was important to me and have been using them now for 4 years. Well worth the money I spent. They are getting a bit bent from the abuse I give them but still work fine.
i would happily recommend buying them.
 

dlz90

Well-Known Member
Tony Limulus on here makes the very best there is IMHO once you use and get used to them you will not go out without them I have the hardwood model exceptionally well made but more importantly work so very very well indeed made of natural wood "ash hardwood type" strong enough to use as walking aid double up to drag a red stag if your strong enough done it phew !! and great to stablise binoculars ect you will not get better honestly.



quadsticks.yolasite.com/
 
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Essex stalker

Well-Known Member
If you haven't time to make your own then Tony's are great and I used a set for several years, however if you have really deep pockets ( and I know this will upset a few on here ) then a set of viper flex with the 5th leg takes a lot of beating, it's what I use nowadays but they don't come cheap
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I have tried most of them over the years.

Twin sticks are great for woodland stalking. Fine out to 100 yds and after that not really stable enough unless you can lean against a tree.

Tripods I didn't really find a lot better than twin sticks. The fore and aft movement is obviously more stable but the big issue is still you moving about at the stock end. Again, great if you have a tree to lean against. I'm good to 130/150 yds with them. I would discount as they are more fiddly to set up than twins and you don't get a lot more stability.

Quads are great. Stability is excellent and I'm happy out to 200 yds with them. There are two downsides to them. Firstly they take a bot longer to set up in general and secondly they are much more difficult to track as you have to lift a set of legs to do so.

I think the ultimate is probably the vipers as they are probably the fastest to set up and the front rest allows you to track a little without lifting a set of legs. They are however a little more pricy that a set of canes from B&Q.

If I'm shooting woodland I take twin sticks. If I'm on the big arable fields I take quads. I don't bother with tripods anymore.
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
Open hill 200m shots tripod or quad sticks are fine I suppose but id rather use a bipod and lie down


Woodland? to slow to set up. I use a tripod but keep it as a single stick. Only set it up as a tripod for fox and very very ocasionaly if I get time on a deer. I also have a Trigger stick mono pole. I love that for close woodland stuff, very quick and easy to carry
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
I bit the bullet and bought a set of sticks a few months back. Seeland ones which are under £100. They are good, I had some B&Q cane twin sticks which were ok but the quality is *****. Then I looked at ally tubing which would be good but if you value your own time I think you’re better off just buying a set. By the time you’ve bought the materials and set about making them you’d have been cheaper buying a set. Not knocking those who do, you could make that argument about reloading or fly tying both of which I do... The Seeland sticks are excellent, very stable and they allow you to slide the forend from side to side to track movement, the rests are rubberised too unlike some more expensive models. If you need to really track a beast use your forend hand to lift one side up and pivot round on the other side, it works fine once you get the hang of it.
 

FISH BOY

Well-Known Member
Get some vipers. Walk with them open with your forth and fith fingers pinched, then it's just a quick flick for bipod or flick and push for longer range quad.

They are an investment, but there is nothing more stable out there for any senario.

Peter Jones from country deer stalking utube channel (i think) does a great video on swift and accurate deployment on them.
 

sikasako

Well-Known Member
I bit the bullet and bought a set of sticks a few months back. Seeland ones which are under £100. They are good, I had some B&Q cane twin sticks which were ok but the quality is *****. Then I looked at ally tubing which would be good but if you value your own time I think you’re better off just buying a set. By the time you’ve bought the materials and set about making them you’d have been cheaper buying a set. Not knocking those who do, you could make that argument about reloading or fly tying both of which I do... The Seeland sticks are excellent, very stable and they allow you to slide the forend from side to side to track movement, the rests are rubberised too unlike some more expensive models. If you need to really track a beast use your forend hand to lift one side up and pivot round on the other side, it works fine once you get the hang of it.

+1 for the Seelands.

Great value for money.

Don't go out stalking without them now.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
Making myself a set of 4 sticks has been the best value for money thing that I've done since I started stalking. I use the 4 sticks as 4 sticks, twin sticks and even on occasion as a single stick. 4 sticks are exceptionally versatile and have improved my roe success rate significantly.

Regards JCS
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I used a set of German made Raptor sticks a couple of weeks ago - a really nice system. Made os Ash and brass and light to carry. They are five legged - front being a tripod and the back popping out to hold the stock. Very stable and was using them in Namibia - I had a very nice Oryx lined up nicely at 250m. It felt very steady, but passed up the shot as the Bull would make a very good trophy in a couple of years time and too good for a cull. But a bit of a faff setting up. On the ground we were hunting lots of low scrub, but mostly longer shots required.

I mostly use a pair of telescoping poles and generally keep them at kneellng sort of heights. I have plenty of fence posts, trees etc that act as additional stability and if I can I drop onto a knee or sitting if longer shot is required.
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
I swear by the B&Q quad sticks I have. [I also have a set of Viperflex sticks, but my B&Q sticks are my go-to solution]

One variation on the DYI theme: I favour stainless bolt fixings in preference to cord bindings. It is not a lot more work and sticks open more fluidly.

 

simonl

Well-Known Member
I swear by the B&Q quad sticks I have. [I also have a set of Viperflex sticks, but my B&Q sticks are my go-to solution]

One variation on the DYI theme: I favour stainless bolt fixings in preference to cord bindings. It is not a lot more work and sticks open more fluidly.

How recently did you buy the poles from B&Q?
I made a pair that lasted many years, but the replacement tubes from B&Q again were pathetic.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Pros - They are very stable to shoot from.

Cons - Theres lots of bits to them and some I have handled rattle easily. There is also one make which has holes in to set the length of the legs and it whistles when its windy!
You cant easily pivot around on a moving target with them without lifting a leg up moving the whole contraption around.
They can take longer to deploy than tripods/bipods. Not in every case of course, and I have seen some that deploy really quickly, but if the bolts are stiff it can be a bit slow.

Personally I really like Bog Pods tripod sticks. They have rubber rings around them on key points to stop rattles, they are simple, easy to deploy, lightweight, strong and stable. I like them a lot and if mine broke then I would definitely buy a new set.
 

Mick Miller

Well-Known Member
I'm just about to give up making them - the green coated tube from B&Q is now so thin it's next to useless & they just don't last at all. They rust out or just snap.

You're doing it wrong. Mine are, I think, five years old, live out in all weathers and are still like the day I made them. I really need to make a video on how to make these, properly. But, I'll tell you this, do NOT cut off the plastic ends or, if you do, make sure you plug them up again completely. DOn't hinge the bottoms with a bolt, only the tops. Make sure you cover that hole with a shaped penny washer that's had a gob of gun blue on and put a blob of sealant underneath.
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Mine live in there when off out with the rifle, all other times they stand by the back door.

Where people go wrong in my opinion is to start off with 6mm bolts!
When you drill a hole for a 6mm bolt it will be straight away be over size by the nature of what and how you drill it.

Off the shelf bolts run in 3-4-5-6-------------8! Not 7mm!

So I all ways use 5mm bolts as over time the hole will wear (unless you bush the hole)
By the nature of the job you need a bit of clearance other wise they will bind, over time the 5mm+ hole will wear to 6mm so then fit 6mm bolts.

The next step up from a worn 6mm hole is 8 which through a 16mm light gauge tube with not put up with much stick and break/snap cause people to moan….lol

With the rubber band way the sticks are in tension and want to close so you will be fighting the bind….all the other stick manufacturers use some form of pivot including Tony from SD.

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Tim.243
 
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