Tikka 270 t3 lite heavy trigger

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willowbank

Well-Known Member
Hi chaps can anyone tell me if they consider the trigger pull weight excessive on T3, I have slackened it off as much as possible but it still seems quite heavy to me and I am sometimes "pulling my shots" my other rifles have quite light triggers which I like.

Any suggestions appreciated.

Regards WB
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
Give Dave Wylde a call at Valkyrie rifles he has trigger springs for most Tikka's good price too, everyone seems happy with the pull after fitting them an easy quick job fitted them to my 595 & 695 and made a nice difference.

Thats interesting, thanks. I have fitted my CZ rifles with different springs so assume the T3 will be as easy?

Regards WB
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
I have to wonder just why todays shooters cannot seem to cope with a normal trigger pressure of 3-5lbs. Are they so weak today?

​Basically it's your technique that needs correcting.
 

david1976

Well-Known Member
I have had 2 t3 rifles and adjusted the trigger myself with the relevant screw.
Taking it right back, in both guns it has been pretty light.
Maybe a moderator would assist in minimising the shot pulling?
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Andi Atzl in Austria makes a trigger for the T3, not sure but maybe they can go down to 20-30 grams...light enough?
I am with Brit on this, if one can't shoot with a 2.5lb trigger on a hunting rifle one should work on the technique.

My T3 lite trigger can go down to slightly under 2 lbs which I think is a bit light and rather have it between 2-3lbs.
edi
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
I have had 2 t3 rifles and adjusted the trigger myself with the relevant screw.
Taking it right back, in both guns it has been pretty light.
Maybe a moderator would assist in minimising the shot pulling?

I have adjusted the trigger to the lightest possible weight and now find it spot on for my preference, nothing to do with a need to adjust technique, I like a light trigger and do not feel I should have to "cope" with anything heavier, my choice.

It now cloverleafs at 100 yds which it certainly was not doing before the adjustment.

The rifle has had a DM80 mod fitted, which I am more than pleased with, from day one so cannot make any comparisons on accuracy or technique.

Regards WB
 

triggersqueezer

Well-Known Member
dave at valkyrie rifles sells lighter springs for the t3.i went the whole hog and had a barnard trigger from dave and it feels great.its not that i can't pull a heavy trigger its like driving a car i could drive a car with no power stearing but one with feels so much better and makes things easy.just personal preference.
 

White Hart

Well-Known Member
I have adjusted the trigger to the lightest possible weight and now find it spot on for my preference, nothing to do with a need to adjust technique, I like a light trigger and do not feel I should have to "cope" with anything heavier, my choice.

It now cloverleafs at 100 yds which it certainly was not doing before the adjustment.

The rifle has had a DM80 mod fitted, which I am more than pleased with, from day one so cannot make any comparisons on accuracy or technique.

Regards WB

The shot I whitnessed from WB the other day there certainly wasnt any problem with technique! The Buck went straight down....
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
I have adjusted the trigger to the lightest possible weight and now find it spot on for my preference, nothing to do with a need to adjust technique, I like a light trigger and do not feel I should have to "cope" with anything heavier, my choice.

It now cloverleafs at 100 yds which it certainly was not doing before the adjustment.

The rifle has had a DM80 mod fitted, which I am more than pleased with, from day one so cannot make any comparisons on accuracy or technique.

Regards WB


The rifle should still cloverleaf with a 3lbs trigger pull. If it does not then it's back to your technique sorry but that the real fact of the matter.

The other consideration is that just how safe is the rifle with the trigger adjusted so light?

It's one thing on the target range but another matter entirely when one is afield with other people. Once the shot is "let go" there is no recalling it!
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
The rifle should still cloverleaf with a 3lbs trigger pull. If it does not then it's back to your technique sorry but that the real fact of the matter.

The other consideration is that just how safe is the rifle with the trigger adjusted so light?

It's one thing on the target range but another matter entirely when one is afield with other people. Once the shot is "let go" there is no recalling it!

Fair comment, its not so light as not to be safe, I have no way of measuring the weight but its the lightest factory setting. With regard to your comment re once a shot is let go, same would apply with a 3lb pull, perfectly safe providing you do not go anywhere near the trigger until the target is in the crosshairs, unless you are assuming the trigger is adjusted to a hair trigger status then I would agree such a rifle would have no place in company when the usual safety precautions may not suffice.

As White Hart verified there is nowt wrong with my technique.

Regards WB
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
As White Hart verified there is nowt wrong with my technique.

Regards WB

Ahhh you previous statement says otherwise:-

It now cloverleafs at 100 yds which it certainly was not doing before the adjustment.

Regards WB

Tis sad to say that we do not spend enough time shooting correctly nowadays. And trigger technique is very badly neglected. I doubt many really squeeze the trigger which is why many need a light pull as they can just stab at it to release the shot. Same can be said about breathing. I wonder how many even know about breathe control?

My own shooting has suffered in the last few years. Poorer health and deteriorating eyesight has taken it's toll. Add a level of unfitness that I have never reached before and well my shooting is not of good as it should be. Add then two years with virtually no shooting and it has taken it's toll. It will take time to recover what I can.

No matter the principles remain the same so a "programme" of shooting the air rifles will be the starting point to get things back on track. As they are spring powered follow through after the release of the shot is of utmost import and should serve well as it did decades ago. The price of air pellets has come as some what of a shock though :eek: .
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Sorry, but the best technique in the world will not overcome the problems introduced by a very stiff or unpredictable trigger.

I am a mediocre shot, but do fine with the factory setting on my two T3s (3lb or so break, groups 1inch at 100m). However, I recently had to use a friend's ancient BSA in .243, and the trigger was a beast. Had to really clench to get it to break, and shots were all over the place. I actually turned down the opportunity to shoot my first fallow buck because I didn't have the confidence that I could put the shot anywhere sensible at 100m.
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Sorry, but the best technique in the world will not overcome the problems introduced by a very stiff or unpredictable trigger.

I am a mediocre shot, but do fine with the factory setting on my two T3s (3lb or so break, groups 1inch at 100m). However, I recently had to use a friend's ancient BSA in .243, and the trigger was a beast. Had to really clench to get it to break, and shots were all over the place. I actually turned down the opportunity to shoot my first fallow buck because I didn't have the confidence that I could put the shot anywhere sensible at 100m.

Hmm well your friend can adjust the BSA's trigger you know ;) the amount of adjustment will vary depending upon which model it is but all BSA's chambered in .243 Winchester will have an adjustable trigger and none of them can be adjusted to a pressure of more than about 6lbs. It sounds like it needs cleaning and looking at.

A trigger with a rather heavy break point is totally different to a trigger that breaks and releases at differing points of travel/pressure. i.e and unpredictable one.

I wonder how many of those rifle shooters who have problems with their trigger technique have never shot pistols? I suspect many of them have never shot pistols before as it's far more important when pistol shooting to have only he trigger finger move and for it to manage the trigger pull in a straight line back into the grip ........................................................... that is if one wishes to hit the target.

Judging all triggers by one that has been poorly adjusted and maintained cannot be the way to do it. For instance when I acquired the Rigby Mannlicher the trigger pull was horrible. It dragged and had lots of creep. I took the Rifle to Rigby's when they was located at the Elephant & Castle and they stripped, cleaned and serviced the rifle for me. Afterwards the trigger was crisp with a clean break. I never bothered measuring the weight of pull. Rigby's also provided a copy of their original ledger page for this rifle. Of course the trigger mechanism fitted to the Model 1892 Steyr is not adjustable and Rigby's stripped the whole rifle and cleaned everything. Back then this service cost me £90.

​Whilst I will clean a trigger mechanism such as the BSA's I will not strip them down. Washing they out well usually clears any problems and then they can be adjusted correctly. The meerest drop of lubrication it used as oil or grease will attract dust and debris which clog the mechanism. Dry lubes are good for triggers. S&W used to sell an excellent dry trigger lube but I have not seen any for many years offered for sale.

Many years ago I did have Fultons of Bisley set up the trigger on a Lee Enfield rifle at the same time that they replaced the incorrect Beech furniture with the correct aged Walnut and bed the rifle. The trigger was set up as per the NRA service rifle competitions rules. They also replaced the trigger and sear on a sporting No1 Rifle I acquired as a previous owner had taken a grinder to them both. This work was required to make the rifle safe to use on the ranges there as it was noted that the trigger was to badly mutilated that it was possible to get a slam fire. To make it safe and correct it also required the replacement of the cocking piece which it seems had also suffered at the butchers hands. many here would not have managed the trigger pull on that rifle as it was the standard two stage trigger with a final release pressure of 5lbs. However it was smooth as silk with NO creep what so ever.

Passing up the offer of the shot on Buck was the correct decision IMHO. A live beast is not a target for practice. The fault however lays with the friend whom has not maintained the rifle and not the rifle itself no matter what make it is.
 

colmd

Member
Trigger spring from Dave at Valkyrie rifles Simple and easy to fit Brilliant job! Be sure to be safe, not too light. Test and test again!!
 

hairlesshunter

Well-Known Member
Uk gunworks do a spring think £8 as colmd says they are very simple and easy to fit if you do fit one don't forget the bump test once done
 
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