To crimp or not to crimp....

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Has anyone gone back and added a crimp to previously-uncrimped loads? If so, what was the outcome? Obviously this would be a bad idea if you're approaching maximum loads though
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Obviously this would be a bad idea if you're approaching maximum loads though
Not really. The crimp does not add that much in the way of pressure as long as it's not carried to excess. I have loaded 5.56 to max with Varget and tested crimped and uncrimped using the same LOT of brass, powder and bullet. No difference in apparent pressures and no change in POI. Just better grouping and more consistent ballistic numbers -something which others here have attested to. I am known to be a large proponent of crimping but I will repeat again, crimping will not cure a load that is incompatible with your rifle. If something is amiss with the load in the first place -wrong component train - crimping will not always help. ~Muir
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
No difference in apparent pressures and no change in POI. Just better grouping and more consistent ballistic numbers -something which others here have attested to
That's interesting @Muir, thank you! My favourite .270 load gives me pretty good results, but I've never bothered to crimp them. I have a crimp die though, so I might just go and crimp a few rounds to compare them :thumb:
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
I never do and never done on rifle cases, used to on pistol loads but i'v no need to for rifle case reloads, I shoot it falls down sorted .
 

paultap

Well-Known Member
I once made a batch of ammunition and somehow missed putting powder in one of the cases, even though I usually carefully check every case with a torch prior to inserting the bullet! I always crimp when reloading, fortunately this stopped the bullet from getting stuck in the rifle barrel as the crimp stopped the bullet leaving the case under the power of the primer.

I now weigh each completed round of ammunition where 40 plus grains of powder difference would show up straight away.
 

Primate

Well-Known Member
I once made a batch of ammunition and somehow missed putting powder in one of the cases, even though I usually carefully check every case with a torch prior to inserting the bullet! I always crimp when reloading, fortunately this stopped the bullet from getting stuck in the rifle barrel as the crimp stopped the bullet leaving the case under the power of the primer.

I now weigh each completed round of ammunition where 40 plus grains of powder difference would show up straight away.
It wouldn't have made any difference. A primer would not propel a bullet crimped or un crimped.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
I once made a batch of ammunition and somehow missed putting powder in one of the cases, even though I usually carefully check every case with a torch prior to inserting the bullet! I always crimp when reloading, fortunately this stopped the bullet from getting stuck in the rifle barrel as the crimp stopped the bullet leaving the case under the power of the primer.

I now weigh each completed round of ammunition where 40 plus grains of powder difference would show up straight away.
The routine I follow helps prevent this possibility... I pour in the powder through a funnel and tap the case to settle it, then put the bullet in and straight into the press to seat. I don't put the case down once the powder is in it. I put the case with seated bullet in the block and then run them through the FCD. If I lose concentration the worst that will happen is that I miss a row out when crimping...but at least that can be seen with a loupe during the final check.

Alan
 
Last edited:

Primate

Well-Known Member
I’m afraid your wrong it’s happened to me
Possibly a calibre thing? Not possible with the bullets I shoot in 6mm and 6.5mm. I guess a really short light bullet hardly seated in the neck may come out. What was your experience with?
 

Primate

Well-Known Member
6.5 missed powder had to drill back off bullet and pull it back through chamber 120gr prohunter
Wow. Fair enough. I'm surprised, didn't think possible but don't doubt what your saying. Properly wedged in then not just a tap with cleaning rod!
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
While at consulting at a ballistics lab I fired a .22LR revolver with nothing but a priming charge in the cases. I think that with CF guns a lot can depend on the case. If the crimp is heavy enough and there is some headspace or a loose pocket, the primer gasses can leak rearward to the extent that the bullet is left in the case. Generally speaking however, the primer alone can generate enough power to propel the bullet from the case mouth.~Muir
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
A primer would not propel a bullet crimped or un crimped.
A primer certainly would under certain circumstances generate enough power to lodge a bullet from an uncharged case into the lands.
Seen it happen quite a few times on ranges and once, to a friend taking a shot at a hind.
Several were a bugger to extract.
 

Primate

Well-Known Member
A primer certainly would under certain circumstances generate enough power to lodge a bullet from an uncharged case into the lands.
Seen it happen quite a few times on ranges and once, to a friend taking a shot at a hind.
Several were a bugger to extract.
Yes, from your own and other people's experiences it would appear so. I've had it happen once, forgetting powder in a .243 round and a friend also. It appeared to have made no difference to the round, if I still had it I'd have measured it out of curiosity. If it ever happens again I will. Having said that after this thread I think there will be a few folks including myself who maybe extra vigilant they didn't miss any cases out with a charge.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
When I taught reloading, in the dark ages before internet, we would teach people to charge each case in turn and when complete, visually inspect that there is a charge of powder in the case and that all charge columns look to be the same height. When did that part of reloading instruction go away?? I keep a pen light on my bench for just that chore.~Muir
 

Blobby159

Well-Known Member
When I taught reloading, in the dark ages before internet, we would teach people to charge each case in turn and when complete, visually inspect that there is a charge of powder in the case and that all charge columns look to be the same height. When did that part of reloading instruction go away?? I keep a pen light on my bench for just that chore.~Muir
Exactly what I do too 'Muir', and well noted ... It is brain-dead SIMPLE to do and is 100% cif your eyes are open and the torch light reaches the top of the poured in powder volume.. Have used this easy, classic(?) method all my reloading career, (since mid 1980s) and ne'er a mishap!!!.

Not many processes can one point to in life with THAT level of correctness and accuracy of use and impact, and this has obviously served me well..
NO double charges
NO empty cases with subsequent (& possible ) bullet lodged up the spout
NO on-the-line club or personal embarrassment and obviously, NO personal health threats from ruptured cases etc. etc...

ATB ....... and shoot SAFELY!
 

Rusty Gate

Well-Known Member
As stated Alan, my experience in 36 years of reloading and the use of brasso, absolutely NO detrimental effect found.
Zero. Zilch. Perfectly fine & I shall continue its use with my latest batch of new brass.
I added a tea cup full to my walnut for tumbling. It's absorbed & cleans the brass lovely. No problems yet but I do keep checking each time as we do anyway.
 

Rusty Gate

Well-Known Member
When I taught reloading, in the dark ages before internet, we would teach people to charge each case in turn and when complete, visually inspect that there is a charge of powder in the case and that all charge columns look to be the same height. When did that part of reloading instruction go away?? I keep a pen light on my bench for just that chore.~Muir
I've a desk lamp for exactly that purpose. The fill won't allow me a double charge without very obvious mess but I won't miss one & lodge one in the spout with a primer when stalking either.
 

paultap

Well-Known Member
The worst thing you can have is somebody trying to talk to you when you are carrying out the reloading process , it's easy to become distracted for a second or two and make a mistake...I now always try to reload ammunition on my own for exactly this reason.

I once stopped a mechanic from starting my car engine whilst carrying out an oil change on my car, the reason, whilst talking to me and becoming distracted he had not yet filled the car engine up with the new oil!.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
I've only tried crimping 22 Hornet and have openly conceded it does appear to reduce group size in my rifle. However, I've also mentioned my belief that this is because it can be difficult to ensure uniform (firm) neck tension in this calibre even with a custom bushing die approach because so little of the neck contacts a 35g V-Max.

I have therefore reffred to crimping as the "poor man's" approach to gaining optimum neck tension as would normally best be realised with a neck bushing die.

Hope this makes some kind of sense?

K
 

Top