To shoot or not to shoot?

Phil fox man

Well-Known Member
Well this morning I was repairing feed hoppers and I noticed o roebuck not 20yds from the hedge just watching me! As I live on the Cheshire plains and for are not a common sight around here the question was do I or don't I? I thought no leave him be got the bins and thermal out and watched him for a while He might come back later on this year maybe with some mates😄and also the freezer is full!
 

andyk

Well-Known Member
Best choice I'd say, no point shooting him if you've nowhere to put the meat.

My thought process on leaving him in future would be whether someone else will shoot him if you don't. If not, let him live and see whether he bring more in. If your neighbour will simply bump him off then it sounds like his card is going to be punched either way, so you might as well be the one to do it.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Personally I think let him be if you dont need to shoot him for cull purposes. Hopefully it will help to establish a bit of a presence on your ground and then you'll have more to choose from.
 

Phil fox man

Well-Known Member
Hi I think I will let him be. As I only stalk for the larder I shoot the adjoining farms he should be ok as long as no do-gooders don't see him and post on social media!Had this done on another farm and every man and his crossbow and dogs were seen out!deer were never seen again!!!!!!!!
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
Nice to see some discretion.
It would appear that deer are out of control in some areas and it seems need to be shot on sight day or night in season or out..???
However in many parts of the country deer are noticeable by their absence.
Many on this forum have no local deer stalking.
After a sighting by the forester I killed a Roe doe, (many years ago,) the first seen in my area. I regretted it ever since.
The Roe population is still low but viable , providing a limited cull depending on the years recruitment.
 

mudman

Well-Known Member
Nice to see some discretion.
It would appear that deer are out of control in some areas and it seems need to be shot on sight day or night in season or out..???
However in many parts of the country deer are noticeable by their absence.
Many on this forum have no local deer stalking.
After a sighting by the forester I killed a Roe doe, (many years ago,) the first seen in my area. I regretted it ever since.
The Roe population is still low but viable , providing a limited cull depending on the years recruitment.
A large part of the country ‘only‘ has roe deer, and if you are not trying to grow trees they generally cause few problems for landowner. Which is a problem when trying to obtain stalking, a farmer has often said to me they cause him no bother and they like to see them about.
 

StephenToast

Well-Known Member
Yes there is - he's said he only shoots for the larder and his freezer is full. He's showing generosity of spirit and I admire it.
I thought he meant the next time he sees it rather than when he saw it originally.

It's up to him but there's no reason not to shoot it.
 

Phil fox man

Well-Known Member
Hi just to clear something up.i have a small shoot on the surrounding farms and lease the sporting rights.i would only shoot a deer on here if they were in a sufficient number
 

sterling

New Member
'the question was do I or don't I? I thought no leave him'
Good man. Self-control and foresight; two of the most important qualities in a responsible hunter I reckon. I'm often in a quandary with deer stalking - I shoot mostly muntjac in coppices. These landowners want them gone. I want to keep landowners happy, manage woodland well, but I also want secure stalking for the future. It's up to us to answer these questions, because we're literally calling the shots.
 

StephenToast

Well-Known Member
Good man. Self-control and foresight; two of the most important qualities in a responsible hunter I reckon. I'm often in a quandary with deer stalking - I shoot mostly muntjac in coppices. These landowners want them gone. I want to keep landowners happy, manage woodland well, but I also want secure stalking for the future. It's up to us to answer these questions, because we're literally calling the shots.
Speaking as a landowner. If you are on my land and my aim is to remove the deer. You are there to remove the deer. Otherwise you are off.

That is why I shoot the deer here. Too many people trying to "secure stalking for the future."
 

mudman

Well-Known Member
Speaking as a landowner. If you are on my land and my aim is to remove the deer. You are there to remove the deer. Otherwise you are off.

That is why I shoot the deer here. Too many people trying to "secure stalking for the future."

I would suspect the reason you shoot the deer on your own land is that no one else would have you on there’s
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Playing devils advocate here, but Mr Toast has a valid point, however much it may go against the grain of all of us who want year on year recreational stalking. If a landowner specifies he wants the deer eradicated, and cannot be reasoned with, you either get on with it or get replaced with someone who will. However, in that situation, the landowner should be paying someone to do the job.
As to the OP, good on you for having the restraint and foresight to try and let the deer establish a population which you could then hope to cull from in a sustainable manner.
 
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