Top Shot

wabbituntr

Well-Known Member
I was browsing the net for information on 'if the world rotates east at 1000+mph and I shoot north 1 mile away would the rotation effect the trajectory if so how much etc'.......And I stumbled upon "LONGEST CONFIRMED SNIPER KILL" -cpl Craig Harrison @ 2.47km! Was it luck....1st shot possible,2nd shot less likley,3rd shot proof that practice makes perfect! Any one have any views on this subject,what do you all think?:camo: :british:
 

trouble

Well-Known Member
when your in your can and theres a fly in it why doesnt it hit the back window when you drive off
 

wabbituntr

Well-Known Member
I was out on the hills while doing this Oh the joys of mobile internet,but you are right I do NEED to get out more! Cracking shot though?:confused:
 

wabbituntr

Well-Known Member
when your in your can and theres a fly in it why doesnt it hit the back window when you drive off
If you jump up while on a plane why don't you fly off to the back of the plane?Well you do have to aim off by about 6" depending how close to the equator you are....Do you think it was a cracking shot then?
 

aliS

Well-Known Member
Yes it's known as the corriolis deflection, dunno how much it would drift the round though.
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
In the days of the British Empire riflemen at it's height they were issued with pocket books that gave sight regulating information for different parts of the globe. The sight setting was different for the highlands of South Africa to the plains of India or the cold shores of the Falklands. In case you did not know engaging the enemy at ranges of 1500- 2800 yards was quite common and was done in platoons using volley fire. Due to the steep angle the bullet descended at even taking cover behind rocks did not protect the enemy was the bullet was coming down onto them. They tested the ammunition and bullet and it penetrated 1" thick deal wood boards laid upon the ground at 2800 yards.

In the North of India during the Panthan (Dervish) troubles a party of dervish's were engaged by a British patrol at extreme range, no machines guns then as they were the province of the Navy and classed as light field artillery, so Volley fire was used. When the patrol advanced after the Panthans went quite on the rear of a ridge were found two dead Panthan tribesmen killed by a single bullet. It had entered the first mad just below the breast bone and exited through the small of his back going through the edge of his rolled up blanket he has slung behind at his waist then entering the second man in the upper gut. Both men were dead from the 215 grain bullet. The officer in charge called upon some field engineers who measured the distance at 2400 yards if I recall correctly. Of course they had no idea which soldier fired that round as volley fire was aimed at covering an area with fire at extreme range just like a machine does in modern warfare.

Unit armourers would have been equipped with a ventometer to adjust the sights and regulate them for the part of the globe the soldiers were serving in.

Now if you attend a long range shooting match say at 1000 yards plus you will see the serious chappies taking wind speed and temperature and consulting tables then setting their sights because at 1200 yards the target has actually moved a fraction of a degree during the time of flight of the bullet due to the earths rotation. Not so important today as it was in the later 19th and early 20th centuries. When shooting the Queens final at 1200 yards with a 577/450 and it's 480 grain bullet at about 1350fps it made a measurable difference. This was of course reduced with the adoption of the 303 at it higher velocity of 2010 fps which was upped with the adoption of the MkV11 loading and it's 174 grain spitzer bullet to 2440fps.

I expect the modern day long range "Sniper" had his ballistic drop and drift information on an electronic gizmo on which they can punch in temp, wind speed, humidity and range and get the required sight regulation information that way.
 

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