Trail Basket Query

Orion

Well-Known Member
#2
Can't imagine why they wouldn't be legal. I have a towball mounted Thule bike rack that projects rear wards about the same distance if not more and that's totally legal. Just observe the usual requirements of number plate and lights being visible - otherwise use a £20 light board from a towing/caravan outlet.
 

dvbookshop

Well-Known Member
#3
Thanks. I ask because I saw one advertised as a road legal model which seemed to imply that others are not. I suppose they wouldn't be much use except on estates otherwise!
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
#4
I have made a clip on number plate for mine to use when on the road but I do not use a lighting board as my lights are above the basket (L/R Discovery)
Perhaps if mounted on a normal road vehicle the number plate and lights may be obscured so the one you saw advertised may have a fixed lighting board.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#6
And I can imagine you'd leave yourself wide open to abuse from any antis getting a glimpse of the basket contents, too (should it be used to transport deer, of course). And with your number plate in full view that wouldn't be a recipe for a peaceful life, regardless of the legality of it
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
#8
And I can imagine you'd leave yourself wide open to abuse from any antis getting a glimpse of the basket contents, too (should it be used to transport deer, of course). And with your number plate in full view that wouldn't be a recipe for a peaceful life, regardless of the legality of it

For up to fallow sized animals a couple of these will probably do the job.

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/waterproof-game-bag-100l-id_8282738.html

View attachment 72628
Anything larger and you'll need a tarp cover at least and maybe a bespoke 'under and over' cover
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
#9
Does anyone know if these baskets which fit onto a towing ball may legally be used on the road?
That will depend on;
1) How far they extend beyond the back of the vehicle.
2) The weight that is exerted on the tow hitch.
3) What arrangements you have made as regards lighting and number plate.

It all comes down to motor vehicle construction and use regulations.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
#12
I wasn't sure as I thought that you could only have a overhanging load up to 750mm without the need for signal boards/ reflectors etc. but from what I have just read its actually 1000mm before signal boards are required. I did find that the minimum ground clearance must be 150mm and there are also some restrictions on carriers sticking out beyond the width of the vehicle.

You also must not exceed the vehicle manufacturers and towbar manufacturers nose weight limits or to give it its correct terminology static vertical mass limit (you learn something new every day). These vary from vehicle to vehicle and from what I understand can be as low as 50Kg or less on small cars and up to around 150Kg on some larger cars and small trucks.
Trailer boards with supplementary lighting will be required if you obscure the number plate or lights.

I wish that some of the twits that carry several bikes around on the back of their cars took the trouble to think of this. How often do you come across a car often at night on a dark road where the rear vehicle lights and number plate are nearly totally obscured by the bike carrier and its load. I know that the police in our area had a campaign on this a few years back, perhaps its about time for them to repeat it as following such a vehicle is often a guessing game, has he applied his brakes, is he indicating?

So going back to the original question I think such devices can be legal provided you comply with the above requirements. If you don't not only would you be breaking the law but in the event of an accident in my experience insurance companies will seize any opportunity not to pay out.
 
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Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
#13
They could have ran the Kent police budget for a year with fines available from seeing the number of illegal bikes on hangers in Dover harbour last Sunday that were leaving the UK.
 

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