Twitter - QC appointed to ban trophy hunting.

There was an article this morning on the BBC

Not known for accuracy and lack of bias it actually was a reasonable article on the effects of this crisis on poaching

According to the article poaching is going through the roof whilst a catastrophic loss of income affects the reserves' ability to provide protection

If travel becomes more expensive in the future, what effect might that have on the tourist dollar for those reserves that rely on huge footfall to bring in income?
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
There was an article this morning on the BBC

Not known for accuracy and lack of bias it actually was a reasonable article on the effects of this crisis on poaching

According to the article poaching is going through the roof whilst a catastrophic loss of income affects the reserves' ability to provide protection

If travel becomes more expensive in the future, what effect might that have on the tourist dollar for those reserves that rely on huge footfall to bring in income?
It's okay, China will step in with 'rescue packages'. (To be paid for in Pangolins, Lion bones and bits of Rhino, of course)
 

Dickie

Well-Known Member
I heard the bbc article this morning and this issue I have is it talked as though the poachers were down on their luck due to the lack of work due to no tourist, so they have all priced up an AK and are out orphaning rhinos for mums tusk, what utter tripe they are organised criminals no more no less.
 

starr shot

Well-Known Member
I think if one were to ban "trophy" hunting, the way to do it so as not to adversely impact protections for wildlife who would otherwise be poached etc. would be to force the nations own government to subsides the shortfall. How would that happen? Well, I notice that a lot of the countries where "trophy" hunting exists are also countries who receive state aide from us. We pay around £14 billion in state aid, with Africa receiving around 50% of that. By putting contractual obligations as to where it will be spent may help, or make a proportion of their funding contingent on achieving a criteria.

I often hear about ban this, ban that..but never any thought about the stakeholders impacted etc.


Also, it brings into question what constitutes as a "Trophy Hunt".

E.g.

Roe buck cull £70 based on a 4 pointer, additional points are £20 each. I shoot a 6 pointer. Is that a trophy?

It depends..

You cant ban something that hasn't been defined.
As I have said before trophy hunting will just be the beginning these people want to ban the hunting and shooting of all animals.Trophy hunting is just the vehicle they are using to try and achieve this. Any memento taken from a hunt could be deemed as a trophy.
 

Wills

Well-Known Member
These animals are poached, as far as I can see for the following reasons:

  • "Medicinal" purpose - supply and demand, feeds into the next point
  • Value. If you ban it, or make it riskier to obtain, the market price increases. If cocaine was freely available, the price would plunge. Its simple economics.
  • Pest effect. Subsistence farmers (or otherwise for that matter) are having their crops threatened. When you and your families survival depends on that crop, its only going to end one way. For that matter, human predation. Don't believe me, look at what is done tigers and elephants in some parts of the world.
  • Culture. Yes I know some may think colonialisim is the best thing since sliced bread and that the world should be "civilised like the UK..." but realistically, applying western self righteousness to substantially less affluent parts of the world isn't going to work. China and ground rhino horn for example. Absolutely no pharmacological benefit.

Hunting big game provides a revenue stream to a county. It's uncomfortable for some, I get that. I have absolutely no desire to shoot something I wouldn't eat, but I wouldn't pay 20k or whatever the price is, to sit on a landrover and photograph elephants. If a revenue stream is removed, then a shortfall needs to be made up from elsewhere otherwise there is no net benefit financially to these countries and money talks, not sanctimony.
 

Lickashot

Well-Known Member
I believe they are poached mainly for food. They have burnt down the farms, beaten and butchered the families.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Has't BASC also got a QC on there books ! , I wonder if they will spend the same amount as anti's will and fight fire with fire ? just saying or maybe all the orgs should stop bun fighting and join as one for a change ?????:coat:
 

starr shot

Well-Known Member
Has't BASC also got a QC on there books ! , I wonder if they will spend the same amount as anti's will and fight fire with fire ? just saying or maybe all the orgs should stop bun fighting and join as one for a change ?????:coat:
You are right this needs to be fought for as a collective.If they win and it’s quiet likely they could not only will we never get it back but it will be the thin edge of the wedge for shooting as a whole.
 

jer

Well-Known Member
It's okay, China will step in with 'rescue packages'. (To be paid for in Pangolins, Lion bones and bits of Rhino, of course)
Many a true word spoken in jest, I have no doubt whatsoever that the Chinese will see an opportunity to secure a good supply of animal parts for their traditional medicines and of course it will be difficult to persuade any African officials to bend the rules :rolleyes:
 

JabaliHunter

Well-Known Member
Has't BASC also got a QC on there books ! , I wonder if they will spend the same amount as anti's will and fight fire with fire ? just saying or maybe all the orgs should stop bun fighting and join as one for a change ?????:coat:
Why would they? Pheasant shooting doesn’t really fit the description of trophy hunting
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Yeh expect your correct as it harks on back to the lead ban cockup , soon it will turn out to be another on your backs boys its Tummy rubbing time again .!
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Be interesting to hear what the legal or moral distinction between an antelope head stuck on a wall and the leather that made the QC's shoes...both animal products...both involve the display of bits of dead animal.

Alan
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
Although Barrister's wigs are now made of horsehair they had an interesting history.

The very first types of the barristers' wig were made from human hair. In most cases, people who owed money would sell their hair to wigmakers in order to clear debts. In addition, the trade for human hair of the dead was also prevalent and provided a raw material source for the making of legal wigs.

In the past, the courtrooms were not very clean. Most of the wigs would have lice, which was not very hygienic. Eventually, they would become smelly and this made courtrooms have a bad stench. This is part of the reason why the material used had to be changed to horsehair.
 

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