unconventional hunting grounds

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#1
I had a conversation with a friend today about unusual and awkward places he's had to shoot deer - like in polly tunnels on soft fruit farms, or at the bottom of large gardens.

It got me wondering. Where's the most unusual, unexpected or awkward place you've managed to successfully shoot something? From remote island to city cemetery?

I can't claim anything spectacular - golf course on the edge of a city is as far as I've gone in terms of unconventional hunting grounds.
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
#3
Munty humane dispatch in someone's rought iron fencing, tangled beyond belief, no way of getting it out. Very bizarre. Even once dead it was a pig to untangle, God knows how it managed to get itself so stuck.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#4
I used to shoot rabbits in the garden of a convent.....
With or without holy sanction?!

I have a friend (a member on here who may or may not decide to reveal himself) who was once asked to despatch a pigeon that had got into the chapel of a Cambridge college. Had to take great care to avoid the stained glass...
 

Druid

Well-Known Member
#5
Used to shoot on a walked up/driven syndicate that had former RAF married quarters as part of the land.
bit odd taking shots at game down a terraced street.
 

long gone

Active Member
#8
Muntjac buck 10m outside someones front door at 4am. They never even opened their curtains (unmoderated .308).
2x adult and 3x cubs 5m from their conservatory that were hell bent on eating their Chiwawa.
and my favourite
putting my Jack Russel up a chimney breast to catch a Squirrel. There was a brief scrap, shortly followed by the squirrel appearing at the fire grate, then followed the terrier who hurtled round the living room chasing the squirrel. He caught it,then ragged it and rolled on it, before I got to him.

The terrier had gone up the chimney clean and white in colour.
He had emerged a very sooty black colour.
The living room HAD a white carpet.

When I finally looked up having picked up the dog, the woman owner was standing there with her chin on the floor. I charged her £35 and she said it was the most amazing thing she'd ever seen. Don't know if the carpet ever recovered.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
#10
A recently passed friend of mine , who lived in northern Alberta , woke up to a noise in the middle of the night . He had a 20X20 trappers cabin that he spent the summer months in . He always had a rifle close at hand by habit , so he grabbed it and turned on his flash light ( no electricity ) . Long story short , he had to skin out and butcher a roughly 450 pound Black Bear at the foot of the bed . Life in the Boreal forest lol .

He became a great believer in locking the door at night after that , go figure .

AB
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
#11
Not hunting but rather trapping. Muskrats (think of miniature beaver) that had colonized a sewage lagoon in a Girls Camp. I removed them through a combination of shooting (preferred) and trapping. Yes, it was as horrendous as it sounds, great care was taken to never get in liquid (clearly not water) deeper than the boots and shoulder length gloves, and a full wash down was made at the end of each trip. As part of the fee, I also was able to get them to replace boots and gloves (so that I never had to wear them again). I still have that stench etched into my memory.
 

goathunter1

Well-Known Member
#12
Maybe more of a culling than hunting tale. An old man I knew used to shoot pigeons inside a large exhibition hall and I think two football stadiums using a .22 rifle with bullets ( I know some will tell me they should be called something else) made of papier mache. If the missed they did not damage the structure.
I have never seen the said bullets but I think they must have been common enough.
 
#13
Council cemetery, four fox one night , two the next, council decided that the fox were rummaging around in the freshly covered graves, upsetting the relatives, ... good earner for the Fireball.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#14
Not hunting but rather trapping. Muskrats (think of miniature beaver) that had colonized a sewage lagoon in a Girls Camp. I removed them through a combination of shooting (preferred) and trapping. Yes, it was as horrendous as it sounds, great care was taken to never get in liquid (clearly not water) deeper than the boots and shoulder length gloves, and a full wash down was made at the end of each trip. As part of the fee, I also was able to get them to replace boots and gloves (so that I never had to wear them again). I still have that stench etched into my memory.
Blerrrgh. Shouldn't have read this over breakfast! Have had to rescue equipment that slipped into one of these once, and I still feel Ill thinking about it!
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
#16
I work my spaniels and have shot on a shoot in Southern Sweden where on one of the drives the guns stand round, faceing a moated castle. The castle was built in the 1800s and is quite a high structure. The grounds are park like with lots of sculpture and a small theater. The guns shoot the ducks driven off the moat. So far no castle windows shot out. Its the strangest Drive I've ever shot on.
 

Tamar

Well-Known Member
#18
I have a friend (a member on here who may or may not decide to reveal himself) who was once asked to despatch a pigeon that had got into the chapel of a Cambridge college. Had to take great care to avoid the stained glass...
I'll bite:D The College had just spent £15,000 on restoring a painting in the chapel and it was about to be unveiled by the Archbishop. A white dove had somehow got in and was perching on the frame of the painting placed high on one of the walls and crapping down. No direct hits so far, but it was only a matter of time. The Chaplain asked if I could do anything about it, so we went to have a look. He decided to bring his children with him 'as they needed to be introduced to death'. I had a dove at ~10m, hopping up and down on the frame of a priceless painting with a 15th C stained glass window about 6 inches above it. Shot placement would be critical. Through my scope, in a poorly lit church, I could see a) one small, bobbing beady eye, b) about £1million worth of backstop. Makes you think. Shot went true and fortunately the relfex flung the pigeon off the frame and away from the painting. It then proceeded to 'helicopter' rather like a sycamore seed, down to the floor, spurting blood from its head, creating a rather macabre spiral on the mosacic floor. The Chaplain likened it to 'the spirit of the Lord descending' as it plummeted. You could just about hear the music from 'The Omen'. The children were a bit shocked. I got a bottle of rather decent port as payment.

I also once shot a squirrel out of the apple tree allegedly grown from the apple that landed on Newton's head, now situated in Cambridge botanical gardens.
 

Ferryman

Well-Known Member
#19
I was asked to do something about deer damage in a large garden here in Hampshire that is opened to the public.
After surveying the garden and locating the deers entry and exit points I dutifully ercted my high seat and informed the owner I would be back early the next morning.
4.00am and I climb up into the seat and settle down to wait for said deer, 6.30am the house keeper arrives with a tray of tea and toast and shouts up to me "Madam thought you might like some breakfast"
I eventually managed to get a doe and twin fawns a week later., upon which after gralloching the the deer the poor gardener was desptched to bury the gralloch while I was treated to a full breakfast.
 

Sylvanius

Well-Known Member
#20
An ecclestiastical one for me too, with written permission from a local vicar to shoot grey squirrels in the churchyard (to preserve the red squirrels that also live there). There was a nearby primary school, who were aware of it as it's in a small village, but being in the countryside, the kids thought it was great!
 

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